Catalog 2013-2014

PLU Directory of Courses

Undergraduate Courses

AICE 276: Part-Time Internship

A supervised educational experience in a work setting on a part-time basis, no less than two four-hour work periods per week. Intended for students who have not yet declared a major or for students seeking an exploratory experience. Requires the completion of a Learning Agreement in consultation with a faculty sponsor. (1 to 8)

AICE 476: Part-Time Advanced Internship

A supervised educational experience in a work setting on a part-time basis, no less than two four-hour work periods per week. Intended for students enrolled in a major who are seeking a professionally-related experience. Requires the completion of a Learning Agreement in consultation with a faculty sponsor. (1 to 8)

ANTH 101: Introduction to Human Biological Diversity - SM

Introduction to biological anthropology with a special focus on human evolution, the fossil evidence for human development, the role of culture in human evolution, and a comparison with the development and social life of the nonhuman primates. (4)

ANTH 102: Introduction to Human Cultural Diversity - C, SO

Introduction to social-cultural anthropology, concentrating on the exploration of the infinite variety of human endeavors in all aspects of culture and all types of societies; religion, politics, law, kinship and art. (4)

ANTH 103: Introduction to Archaeology and World Prehistory - SO

Introduction to the ideas and practice of archaeology used to examine the sweep of human prehistory from the earliest stone tools to the development of agriculture and metallurgy and to enrich our understanding of extinct societies. (4)

ANTH 104: Introduction to Language in Society - SO

Introduction to anthropological linguistics and symbolism, including the origin of language; sound systems, structure and meaning; language acquisition; the social context of speaking; language change; nonverbal communication; and sex differences in language use. (4)

ANTH 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

ANTH 192: Practicing Anthropology: Makah Culture Past and Present - A, SO

Study of Makah culture through archaeology and history and by interacting with the Makah. Active and service learning in Neah Bay, visiting the Makah Nation. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (4)

ANTH 210: Global Perspectives: The World in Change - C, SO

A survey of global issues: modernization and development; economic change and international trade; diminishing resources; war and revolution; peace and justice; and cultural diversity. (Although this course is cross-listed with HIST/POLS 210, students receive anthropology credit only when this course has a faculty member from anthropology.) (4)

ANTH 220: Peoples of the World - SO

Exploration of the world's cultures through anthropological films, novels, and eyewitness accounts. Case studies chosen from Africa, Native America, Asia, the Pacific, and Euro-America provide an insider's view of ways of life different from our own. (2)

ANTH 225: Past Cultures of Washington State - A, SO

Native Americans have lived in Washington State for more than 12,000 years. Cultures of coastal interior peoples are examined through time until the emergency of the distinctive cultures observed by the earliest European visitors to the area. Particular attention is focused on the impact of archaeology on contemporary peoples. (2)

ANTH 230: Peoples of the Northwest Coast - A, SO

A survey of the ways of life of the native peoples of coastal Washington, British Columbia, and Southeastern Alaska from European contact to contemporary times, including traditional methods of fishing, arts, potlatches, status systems, and wealth and their impact on the modern life of the region. (2)

ANTH 287: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 288: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 289: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

ANTH 305: Exploring Anthropology - Conceptual and Procedural Approaches

Exploration of how humans, culture, and society are understood and studied anthropologically. Students will learn anthropological concepts and approaches associated with the four sub-disciplines, procedures for conducting anthropological projects, qualitative and quantitative analyses, and anthropological ethics. Prerequisites: ANTH 102, at least one more anthropology course, or consent of instructor. (4)

ANTH 330: Cultures and Peoples of Native North America - A, SO

A comparative study of Native North American cultures from their arrival on the continent through today. Examination of U.S. and Canadian laws, policies, and conflicts, issues of sovereignty, and religious rights. (4)

ANTH 332: Prehistory of North America - SO

An archaeological reconstruction of economic, social, political, and religious life in North America from the time the first settlers entered the continent during the Ice Ages to the Mound Builders of later times and ultimately to the first contact with European settlers. (4)

ANTH 334: The Anthropology of Contemporary America - A, SO

An investigation of American social patterns and problems designed to give insights from a cross-cultural perspective; exploration of American solutions to common human problems; a determination of what is unique about the "American Way." (4)

ANTH 335: The Aztecs, Mayans and Their Predecessors - C, SO

This course is an archaeological and ethnohistoric survey of the emergence and nature of complex societies in ancient Mesoamerica. Besides the Aztecs and Mayans, other fascinating cultures of study include the Olmecs, Teotihaucanos, and the Toltecs. Emphasis is placed on how these Meosamerican societies were structured and how they changed over time. (4)

ANTH 336: Peoples of Latin America - C, SO

Millions of Americans have never been north of the equator. Who are these "other" Americans? This survey course familiarizes the student with a broad range of Latin American peoples and problems. Topics range from visions of the supernatural to problems of economic development. (4)

ANTH 337: Culture and Prehistory of Central Mexico - C, SO

This course is an in-country examination of the rich past and present cultural variation of Central Mexico. It is structured around discussions and lectures in various modern venues and the impressive archaeological remains in Mexico City, and the states of Morelos, and Oaxaca. (4)

ANTH 338: Jewish Culture - A, SO

An exploration of American Jewish culture through its roots in the lifeways of Eastern European Ashkenazic Jews and its transformation in the United States. Emphasis on Jewish history, religion, literature, music, and humor as reflections of basic Jewish cultural themes. (4)

ANTH 340: The Anthropology of Africa - C, SO

Study of Africa's diverse cultures. Focus on early studies of villages and topics such as kinship, religion, and social structure, and on more recent studies of urban centers, the impact of colonialism, popular culture, and post-colonial politics. (4)

ANTH 342: Pacific Island Cultures - C, SO

Peoples of Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia. Developments in the Pacific region are explored, including economic development, migration, environmental degradation, political movements, gender roles, the impact of Western media, tourism, and cultural revivalism. How shifting theoretical models have informed the representation of Pacific cultures will also be considered. (4)

ANTH 343: East Asian Cultures - C, SO

A survey of the cultures and peoples of Eastern Asia, concentrating on China but with comparative reference to Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Cultural similarities as well as differences between these nations are stressed. Topics include religion, art, politics, history, kinship, and economics. (4)

ANTH 345: Contemporary China - C, SO

An immersion into the culture and society of the People's Republic of China; contemporary politics, kinship, folk religion, human relations; problems and prospects of development and rapid social change. (4)

ANTH 350: Women and Men in World Cultures - C, SO

An overview of the variation of sex roles and behaviors throughout the world; theories of matriarchy, patriarchy, mother goddesses, innate inequalities; marriage patterns, impact of European patterns; egalitarianism to feminism. (4)

ANTH 352: The Anthropology of Age - C, SO

This course examines the broad diversity of how cultures define the behavioral strategies of people as they age, how aging differentially is experienced by men and women, and how intergenerational family relationships change as individuals make transitions between life stages. Global issues of health, development, and human rights are considered. (4)

ANTH 360: Ethnic Groups - A, SO

Examines the nature of ethnic groups in America and abroad; the varying bases of ethnicity (culture, religion, tribe, "race," etc.); problems of group identity and boundary maintenance; ethnic symbols; ethnic politics; ethnic neighborhoods; and ethnic humor. (4)

ANTH 365: Prehistoric Environment and Technology: Lab Methods in Archaeology - SO

Laboratory interpretation of archaeological materials. Techniques used in interpreting past human ecology, technology, and economy. Analytical procedures for bone, stone, ceramic, and metal artifacts; analysis of debris from food processing activities. Analysis of materials from archaeological sites. (1 to 4)

ANTH 368: Edible Landscapes, The Foraging Spectrum - C, SO

The course examines foragers in Africa, North America, and Australia. Using classic ethnographic literature, it provides a cultural ecological perspective of foraging societies in a variety of environments. It also examines how foraging studies inform archaeological research, and the challenges that these peoples now face in a rapidly changing world. (4)

ANTH 370: The Archaeology of Ancient Empires - C, SO

The origins of agriculture, writing, cities, and the state in many parts of the world, comparing and contrasting the great civilizations of antiquity, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, Asia, Mesoamerica, and South America. (4)

ANTH 376: Nation, State, and Citizen - C, SO

How did "the nation" come to be the dominant legitimization of "the state"? What technologies of power are contemporary states based on? How do states define their ideal citizens and citizens reshape their state? Specific topics may include refugees, transnational identities, colonialism, and neo-liberalism. (4)

ANTH 380: Sickness, Madness and Health - C, SO

A cross-cultural examination of systems of curing practices and cultural views of physical and mental health; prevention and healing; nature and skills of curers; definitions of disease; variation in diseases; impact of modern medical and psychological practitioners. (4)

ANTH 385: Marriage, Family and Kinship - C, SO

Explores the nature of domestic groups cross-culturally, including the ways in which religion, myth, magic, and folklore serve to articulate and control domestic life; how changing systems of production affect marriage and domestic forms; and how class and gender systems intertwine with kinship, domestic forms, and the meaning of "family." (4)

ANTH 387: Special Topics in Anthropology - SO

Selected topics as announced by the department. Course will address important issues in archaeology and cultural anthropology. (1 to 4)

ANTH 388: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 389: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 392: Gods, Magic and Morals - C, SO

Anthropology of religion; humanity's concepts of and relationships to the supernatural; examination of personal and group functions that religions fulfill; exploration of religions both "primitive" and historical; origins of religion. Cross-listed with RELI 392. (4)

ANTH 465: Archaeology: The Field Experience - SO

Excavation of a historic or prehistoric archaeological site, with emphasis on basic excavation skills and record keeping, field mapping, drafting, and photography. The laboratory covers artifact processing and preliminary analysis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (1 to 8)

ANTH 480: Anthropological Inquiry

Historic and thematic study of the theoretical foundations of sociocultural anthropology; research methods; how theory and methods are used to establish anthropological knowledge. Required of majors in their junior or senior year. (4)

ANTH 487: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 488: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 489: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 491: Independent Studies: Undergraduate Readings

Reading in specific areas or issues of anthropology under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: departmental consent. (1 to 4)

ANTH 492: Independent Studies: Undergraduate Fieldwork

Study of specific areas or issues in anthropology through field methods of analysis and research supported by appropriate reading under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: departmental consent. (1 to 4)

ANTH 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

ANTH 499: Capstone: Seminar in Anthropology - SR

Examine anthropological methods and apply anthropological theory to an investigation of a selected topic in contemporary anthropology. Required of majors in their junior or senior year. Prerequisite for non-majors: departmental approval. (4)

ARTD 101: Drawing 1 - AR

A course dealing with the basic techniques and media of drawing. (4)

ARTD 102: 2D Design/Color Theory - AR

This course combines course work in color and composition. Students will develop a better understanding in pictorial composition, color theory, patterning, materials and methods in the two-dimensional arts, perspective, and a range of conceptual design strategies. Required for all BA/BFA majors. (4)

ARTD 110: Graphic Design 1 - AR

An introduction to design through the study of basic techniques, color theory, and composition. (4)

ARTD 180: History of Western Art I - AR

A survey tracing the development of Western art and architecture from prehistory to the end of the Middle Ages. (4)

ARTD 181: History of Western Art II - AR

A survey of Western art and architecture from the Renaissance to the 20th century. (4)

ARTD 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

ARTD 201: Drawing 2: Figure Drawing - AR

Drawing taken beyond the basics of 101. Expansion of media forms, and solutions to compositional problems. Possibility of pursuing special individual interests, with permission. Prerequisite: ARTD 101 or consent of instructor. (4)

ARTD 202: 3D Design - AR

Students will develop an understanding in three-dimensional design with an emphasis on spatial awareness, problem-solving, and the many varieties of sculptural form. Required for all B.A. and B.F.A. majors. (4)

ARTD 210: Graphic Design 2

An investigation of the process of creative problem solving in a methodical and organized manner. Includes projects in a variety of design areas. Prerequisite: ARTD 110 or consent of instructor. (4)

ARTD 220: Photography I: BW Photography - AR

A studio class in photography as an art form. Primary concentration in basic camera and darkroom techniques. Students produce a portfolio of prints with an emphasis on creative expression and experimentation. (4)

ARTD 230: Ceramics 1 - AR

Introduction to ceramic materials, tools, and techniques including hand-built and wheel-thrown methods, and glaze application. Includes a survey of ceramic art. (4)

ARTD 250: Sculpture 1 - AR

Focus on techniques and processes in various mediums with attention to conceptualization and craftsmanship in three-dimensional space. Metal, wood, plaster, synthetics, video and tools used in fabrication processes. Includes a video survey of contemporary and historical artists. (4)

ARTD 280: Art Methodology and Theory - AR

Explores art historical and critical methods used for the analysis of art, including formalism, iconography, iconology, economic/social contexts, psychology, feminism, and structuralism/semiotics. Relates methods to broader cultural theories from Kant to Edward Said. (4)

ARTD 287: Special Topics in Art - AR

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ARTD 288: Special Topics in Art - AR

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ARTD 289: Special Topics in Art - AR

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ARTD 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

ARTD 310: Graphics Design 3

Design and execution of printed materials; emphasis on technical procedures and problems in mass communication. Prerequisite: ARTD 210 or consent of instructor. (4)

ARTD 315: The Art of the Book I - AR

This studio course explores the history, aesthetics and creative dimensions of book design and typography. Cross-listed with ENGL 313. Requires permission from the Printing and Publishing Arts Director in the Department of English and instructor. (4)

ARTD 320: Photography 2: Digital Photography - AR

An introduction to computer-assisted photography in which students learn applications, develop aesthetic strategies, and engage the ethical issues of this new technology. Emphasis on creative exploration and problem solving within the Macintosh environment. May be taken twice. (4)

ARTD 330: Ceramics 2

Advanced techniques in ceramic construction and experiments in glaze formation. Focus on form and craftsmanship. Prerequisite: ARTD 230 or consent of the instructor. (4)

ARTD 340: Elementary Art Education

A study of creative growth and development; art as studio projects; history and therapy in the classroom. (2)

ARTD 350: Sculpture 2

Fall semester has a focus on foundry (cast aluminum, bronze, and iron), using lost wax and lost foam processes. Spring semester has a focus on welding utilizing gas and MIG processes (text required). Both courses emphasize mixed media sculpture. May be taken twice for credit. Prerequisite: ARTD 250. (4)

ARTD 355: 3D Digital Modeling - AR

An introduction to three-dimensional modeling. Students will learn to design and manipulate objects in 3D digital space. (4)

ARTD 365: Painting I

Media and techniques of painting in oil or acrylics. Prerequisite: ARTD 101. (4)

ARTD 370: Printmaking 1

Methods and media of fine art printmaking; both hand and photo processes involving lithographics, intaglio, and screen printing. Prerequisite: ARTD 101 or consent of instructor. (4)

ARTD 380: Modern Art - AR

The development of art from 1900 to the present, with a brief look at European and American antecedents as they apply to contemporary directions. (4)

ARTD 381: Contemporary Art - AR

Is an investigation of international art production since 1960. These include definitions of modernism, issues of identity and the representation of race, class, and gender as well as the role of the body in art and artists' engagement with popular culture and politics. (4)

ARTD 382: Art of 19th-Century Europe - AR

Examines the early history of modern art from Neoclassicism and Romanticism through Realism and Post-impressionism. Key artists studied include David, Delacroix, Fredrich, Turner, Courbet, Monet, Degas, Manet, Renoir, Van Gogh, Seurat, Cezanne, and Gauguin. (4)

ARTD 383: Studies in Art History - AR

A selected area of inquiry, such as a history of American art, Asian art, the work of Picasso, or similar topics. May be repeated for credit. (4)

ARTD 387: Special Topics in Art - AR

This course in intended for unique opportunities to explore artistic expression, provided by visiting artists or artists in residence who intend to focus on a particular style, element or technique used in creative and artistic expression. (1 to 4)

ARTD 388: Special Topics in Art - AR

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ARTD 389: Special Topics in Art - AR

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit.. (1 to 4)

ARTD 399: Keystone

This "Keystone" course is intended for upper-division students to develop the process of educational assessment and program competencies. Focus is on integrating student learning objectives with student experience through initial development of portfolio projects and other assignments. Not repeatable. (1 or 2)

ARTD 410: Graphic Design 4

Design and execution of printed materials; emphasis on technical procedures and problems in mass communication. Explores advanced techniques with multiple color, typography, and other complex problems. Prerequisite: ARTD 310 or consent of instructor. (4)

ARTD 420: Photography 3: Color Photography - AR

Exploration of the issues of both painters and photographers. Students learn to make color prints and process color negatives. Includes a historical survey of color photography as well as perspectives of contemporary artists. (4)

ARTD 425: Photography 4: Lighting Environments

Light Environments explores various lighting strategies in photography and will explore various lighting techniques from a variety of genres: landscape, still life, portraiture, copy arts, product and fashion photography. Prerequisite: ARTD 420 or consent of instructor. (4)

ARTD 430: Ceramics 3

Individual research into ceramic construction, kiln operations, experiments in glaze formation, and non-traditional surface treatments. May be taken twice. Prerequisite: ARTD 330. (4)

ARTD 450: Sculpture 3

This course emphasizes student formulated projects and research using processes and skills gained in the prerequisite courses. There is an emphasis on mixed media sculpture. May be taken twice. Prerequisite: ARTD 350 or consent of instructor. (4)

ARTD 465: Painting 2

Media and techniques of painting in oil or acrylics. May be taken twice. Prerequisite: ARTD 365 or consent of instructor. (4)

ARTD 466: Painting 3

Explore and develop student's portfolio of work within the area of painting. Independent project emphasis with instructor's input. Emphasis on student's development of individual style and problem solving. May be taken twice. Prerequisite: ARTD 365 or consent of instructor. (4)

ARTD 470: Printmaking 2

Methods and media of fine art printmaking; both hand and photo processes involving lithographics, intaglio, and screen printing. May be taken twice. Prerequisite: ARTD 370 or consent of instructor. (4)

ARTD 480: American Art to 1900 - AR

Examines the American experience from Colonial portraiture through transcendentalism and naturalism. Major artists covered include Copley, Cole, Church, Easkins, and Homer. The contributions of expatriate artists such as Whistler, Sargent, and Cassatt are incorporated. (4)

ARTD 483: Studio Practice

This course is focused on the student's individual research towards the capstone exhibition in collaboration with their faculty mentor or advisor. Requires senior standing, and may be taken twice for credit. Required for all BFA majors. (1 to 4)

ARTD 484: Research in Art History - Theory

A tutorial course for major students with research into a particular aspect of art history or theory. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Senior status, consent of instructor, and program approval by department faculty. (1 to 4)

ARTD 487: Special Topics in Art

This course is intended for unique opportunities to explore artistic expression provided by visiting artists or artists in residence who intend to focus on a particular style, element, or technique used in creative and artistic expression. (1 to 4)

ARTD 488: Special Topics in Art - AR

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ARTD 489: Special Topics in Art

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ARTD 490: Gender and Art - A, AR

Studies the effects of race and class on the construction of femininity and masculinity in art and visual culture in the United States and in Europe, with an emphasis on 19th and 20th century modernism. May not be repeated for credit. (4)

ARTD 491: Independent Studies: Special Projects

Exploration of the possibilities of selected studio areas, including experimental techniques. Emphasis on development of individual styles, media approaches, and problem solutions. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Junior status, minimum of two courses at 200 level or above in affected medium with minimum 2.50 GPA, consent of instructor and department chair. (1 to 4)

ARTD 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

ARTD 499: Capstone - SR

Capstone course for undergraduate degrees in the Department of Art & Design. Focus is on integrating student learning objectives with student experience through development and presentation of portfolio projects and other assignments. (2 to 4)

BIOL 111: Biology and the Modern World - NS, SM

This course is intended to introduce students to the principles and concepts that pertain to all living organisms, with special emphasis on those topics typically encountered in everyday life, including human physiology and disease, environmental issues, and the fundamentals of genetics. Lecture and laboratory. Not intended for biology majors. (4)

BIOL 116: Introductory Ecology - NS, SM

A study of the interrelationships between organisms and their environment examining concepts in ecology that lead to understanding the nature and structure of ecosystems and how humans impact ecosystems. Includes laboratory. Not intended for biology majors. (4)

BIOL 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

BIOL 201: Introductory Microbiology - NS, SM

The structure, metabolism, growth, and genetics of microorganisms, especially bacteria and viruses, with emphasis on their roles in human disease. Laboratory focuses on cultivation, identification, and control of growth of bacteria. Prerequisite: CHEM 105. Not intended for biology majors. (4)

BIOL 205: Human Anatomy and Physiology I - NS, SM

The first half of a two-course sequence. Topics include matter, cells, tissues, and the anatomy and physiology of four systems: skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine. Laboratory includes cat dissection and experiments in muscle physiology and reflexes. Not intended for biology majors. (4)

BIOL 206: Human Anatomy and Physiology II - NS, SM

The second half of a two-course sequence. Topics include metabolism, temperature regulation, development, inheritance, and the anatomy and physiology of five systems: circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive. Laboratory includes cat dissection, physiology experiments, and study of developing organisms. Not intended for biology majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 205. (4)

BIOL 225: Molecules, Cells, and Organisms - NS, SM

An introduction to the concepts and study of the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels of biological organization. Cell structure and function, energy transformation, the central dogma of molecular biology, plant and animal anatomy and physiology, response to environmental changes, plant and animal reproduction and development. Includes laboratory. Co-registration or completion of CHEM 115 is recommended. (4)

BIOL 226: Genes, Evolution, Diversity, and Ecology - NS, SM

An introduction to the concepts and study of Mendelian and population genetics, evolution, ecology, and a systematic survey of life on earth. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 225 with a C- or better. (4)

BIOL 287: Special Topics in Biology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BIOL 288: Special Topics in Biology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BIOL 289: Special Topics in Biology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BIOL 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

BIOL 330: Genetics

Basic concepts considering the molecular basis of gene expression, recombination, genetic variability, as well as cytogenetics, and population genetics. Includes tutorials and demonstration sessions. Prerequisite: BIOL 226. (4)

BIOL 341: Developmental Biology

The embryonic and larval development of multicellular organisms (primarily animals). Examples are chosen from popular contemporary model systems, and the emphasis is on cellular and molecular aspects of development. The laboratory includes descriptive and quantitative experiments, as well as student-planned projects. Prerequisite: BIOL 226. (4)

BIOL 342: Microbiology

The structure, physiology, genetics, and metabolism of microorganisms with emphasis on their diversity and ecology. The laboratory emphasizes design, implementation, and evaluation of both descriptive and quantitative experiments as well as isolation of organisms from natural sources. Prerequisites: BIOL 226; CHEM 331 with CHEM 333 recommended. (4)

BIOL 352: Comparative Anatomy

Evolutional history of the vertebrate body, introduction to embryology, and extensive consideration of the structural and functional anatomy of vertebrates. Includes laboratory dissections following a systems approach. Mammals are featured plus some observation of and comparison with human cadavers. Prerequisite: BIOL 226. (4)

BIOL 353: Invertebrate Zoology

The study of invertebrate animals emphasizing their classification, anatomy, physiology and natural history. Coverage will also include the economic and human health importance of select groups. Laboratory emphasis on identification, taxonomy and anatomy. Field trips to observe living representatives. Prerequisite: BIOL 226 or consent of instructor. (4)

BIOL 354: Natural History of Vertebrates

A systematic survey of vertebrate diversity including fishes, amphibians, non-avian reptiles, and mammals. Coverage emphasizes phylogenetic relationships, evolutionary trends, natural history, and anatomy. Field trips and laboratory focus on observation and identification of local species. Prerequisite: BIOL 226. (4)

BIOL 355: Ornithology

The study of birds inclusive of their anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology and distribution. Special emphasis on those attributes of birds that are unique among the vertebrates. Laboratory emphasis on field identification, taxonomy, and anatomy/topology. Prerequisite: BIOL 226 or consent of instructor. (4)

BIOL 356: Economic and Cultural Botany

Botany of plants used by humans in a global context; traditional and contemporary uses of plants. General plant morphology and anatomy, overview of taxonomy of plants useful to humans, evolution of plant secondary metabolites, medical botany (medicines, poisons, psychoactive plants), genetic engineering, bio-prospecting and socio-economic issues surrounding botanical commodities. Prerequisite: BIOL 226. (4)

BIOL 357: Histology

The tissue level of biological organization, including animal and plant tissues. Tissue contributions to organ structure and function. Laboratory includes examination of prepared microscope slides as well as tissue processing and preparation of permanent microscope slides of sectioned and stained animal and plant tissues. Prerequisite: BIOL 226. (4)

BIOL 358: Plant Physiology

A study of how plants obtain and utilize nutrients, react to environmental factors, and adapt to stress. Focuses on mechanisms at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Explores connections to agriculture and ecology. Relies significantly on primary literature. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 226. (4)

BIOL 362: Animal Behavior

A survey of the field of animal behavior with an emphasis on integrating behavioral analyses into an explicitly evolutionary framework. An understanding of both the proximate and ultimate mechanisms underlying behavior is emphasized. Laboratory/discussion in addition to lecture. Prerequisite: BIOL 226. (4)

BIOL 366: Comparative Ecology of Latin America

A comparative study of the structure and function of biotic communities, and the ecological and evolutionary forces that have shaped plants and animals. Topics include dispersal, natural selection, physiological ecology, natural history, and systematics. Conservation biology, development, and indigenous rights will be highlighted. Taught in Central or South America. Prerequisite: BIOL 226 or consent of instructor. (4)

BIOL 367: Conservation Biology and Management

Based upon the principles of population ecology and ecological genetics, an integrated study of the impacts of people on nature - specifically the diversity of plants and animals. Includes practical applications, techniques, and case studies in forest, fish, wildlife and land management. Laboratories and field trips concern resource management and use. Course may not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: BIOL 226 or consent of instructor. (4)

BIOL 368: Ecology

Organisms in relation to their environment, including organismal adaptations, population growth and interactions, and ecosystem structure and function. Laboratory/discussion in addition to lecture. Prerequisite: BIOL 226. (4)

BIOL 369: Marine Biology

The ocean as environment for plant and animal life; an introduction to structure, dynamics, and history of marine ecosystems. Lab, field trips, and term project in addition to lecture. Prerequisite: BIOL 226. (4)

BIOL 387: Special Topics in Biology - NS

Selected topics as announced by the department. May be repeated for credit. (1 to 4)

BIOL 388: Special Topics in Biology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BIOL 389: Special Topics in Biology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BIOL 442: Cell Biology

Focuses on cellular organization and function, enzyme kinetics, membrane structure and function, energetics, signaling and cell cycle. Laboratory employs modern techniques including animal cell culture, cell fractionation, molecular, genetic, and biochemical assays, and microscopy (light, phase contrast, fluorescence). Prerequisite: BIOL 226 and CHEM 331 with 333, or consent of instructor. (4)

BIOL 444: Neurobiology

Neurobiology is the study of the nervous system and its relationship to behavior and disease. This course examines the structure and function of neurons and glia, neural development, gross organization of the brain, sensory and motor systems and higher functions such as learning, memory and speech. Prerequisite: BIOL 330 or consent of instructor. (4)

BIOL 445: Molecular Biology

An introduction to molecular biology, emphasizing the central role of DNA: structure of DNA and RNA, structure and expression of genes, genome organization and rearrangement, methodology and applications of recombinant DNA technology. Laboratory features basic recombinant DNA techniques. Prerequisite: BIOL 330. (4)

BIOL 448: Immunology

Consideration of the biology and chemistry of immune response, including theoretical concepts, experimental strategies and immunochemical applications. Prerequisites: Any two of the following courses in Biology: 330, 341, 342, 442, 445, 453 (4)

BIOL 449: Virology

The diversity that exists among viruses is staggering, and there is no type of life on Earth that is not subject to infection by viruses. This course will explore viral origins, replication, transmission, pathogenesis, oncogenesis, and host immunity. Emerging viruses, pandemics, and vaccines will also be discussed. Students will gain hands-on experience in a wide range of techniques and will work with both bacteriophages and animal viruses. Prerequisite: BIOL 330. (4)

BIOL 453: Mammalian Physiology

An investigation of the principles of physiological regulation. Part I: fundamental cellular, neural, and hormonal mechanisms of homeostatic control; Part II: interactions in the cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, and neuromuscular organ systems. Laboratory allows direct observation of physiological regulation in living animals. Prerequisites: BIOL 226, CHEM 115; BIOL 352 recommended. (4)

BIOL 461: Evolution

An introduction to evolutionary theory and its broad explanatory power in biology. Coverage includes: a brief history of evolutionary thought, population genetics and the mechanisms of evolutionary change, phylogenetics, speciation, macroevolutionary processes, origins of life on earth, and evo-devo. Laboratory includes simulations and empirical examples of concepts covered in lecture. Prerequisite: BIOL 330. (4)

BIOL 462: Plant Diversity and Distribution

A systematic introduction to plant diversity. Interaction between plants, theories of vegetational distribution. Emphasis on higher plant taxonomy. Includes laboratory and field trips. Prerequisite: BIOL 330. (4)

BIOL 487: Special Topics in Biology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BIOL 488: Special Topics in Biology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BIOL 489: Special Topics in Biology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BIOL 491: Independent Studies

Investigations or research in areas of special interest not covered by regular courses. Open to qualified junior and senior majors. Prerequisite: Written proposal for the project approved by a faculty sponsor and the department chair. (1 to 4)

BIOL 495: Internship in Biology

An approved off-campus work activity in the field of biology with a private or public sector agency, organization or company. Students will be expected to adhere to and document the objectives of a learning plan developed with and approved by a faculty sponsor. Credit will be determined by hours spent in the working environment and the depth of the project associated with the course of study. Prerequisites: BIOL 226 and consent of department chair. (1 to 4)

BIOL 499A: Capstone: Senior Seminar I - SR

Seminar focuses on developing and practicing oral and written presentation skills. Assignments and activities reinforce student ability to read and interpret scientific literature. Students work with individual mentors to select and outline an appropriate topic for a research project based on a review of the scientific literature or original student research. May graduates should take this course in the fall of their final year. December graduates should take this course in their final spring semester. Together with BIOL 499B meets the senior seminar requirement. Prerequisite: BIOL 225, 226, 330, and significant progress towards meeting the upper-division course requirements as determined by the Capstone Committee. (1)

BIOL 499B: Capstone: Senior Seminar II - SR

Students continue to work with individual mentors to complete the written and oral presentations of a research project based on a review of the scientific literature or original student research. May graduates should take this course in the spring semester of their final year. December graduates should take this course in their final Fall Semester. Together with BIOL 499A meets the senior seminar requirement. Prerequisite: BIOL 499A. (1)

BUSA 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

BUSA 201: Introduction to Business in the Global Environment

Understanding business in the global marketplace and how functions and applications contribute to mission. Introduction to domestic and global economic, competitive, social, cultural, political and legal environments of the business enterprise, and how to integrate ethical and socially responsible behavior in the business environment. Opportunity to reflect on professional goals and explore potential careers in business. (4)

BUSA 202: Financial Accounting

Accounting for financial performance for the use of external decision-makers considering investment in a business organization. Origins and uses of financial information; accounting concepts and principles; logic, content, and format of financial statements; accounting issues in the U.S. and other nations. Prerequisite: MATH 128 or co-enrollment in MATH 128. (4)

BUSA 203: Managerial Accounting

Introduction to the use of accounting data for decision making, managerial planning, and operational control. Topics include cost-volume-profit relationships, operational budgeting, capital budgeting, and performance evaluation. Familiarity with Microsoft Excel or other spreadsheet software is required. Prerequisites: BUSA 202, CSCE 120 or competency by exam. (4)

BUSA 287: Special Topics in Business

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BUSA 288: Special Topics in Business

Seminar on selected topic in business. (1 to 4)

BUSA 289: Special Topics in Business

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BUSA 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

BUSA 302: Business Finance

Foundations of finance (e.g., time-value, risk-return relationship, market efficiency, cost of capital), corporate finance (e.g., statement analysis, decsion making, capital structure, firm financing), asset pricing (e.g., valuation, diversification), and an introduction to selected topics (e.g., behavioral finance, ethics, investments, international finance), with an emphasis on using spreadsheets to develop quantitative skills. Prerequisite: BUSA 203. (4)

BUSA 303: Business Law and Ethics

Foundation in U.S. business law and the U.S. legal system. Legal principles governing contract, tort, agency, intellectual property, employment, consumer law and the legal structures of business organizations. Explores legal issues raised by operating in a global environment. Analyzes the ethical duties of those in business, including obligations under professional codes of ethics, and explores the interrelationship of law, ethics, and principles of sustainability in the business context. Note that BUSA 303 and 304 may not both be taken for credit. Open to any major with permission of instructor. (4)

BUSA 304: Business Law and Ethics for Financial Professionals

For finance, accounting, or similar fields which demand an understanding of the laws affecting financial transactions, including the Uniform Commercial Code articles dealing with negotiable instruments, sales contracts, and secured lending. Surveys significant areas of business law including contract, tort, agency, employment, legal structures of business, creditor/debtor rights and securities regulations. Analyzes the ethical duties of financial professionals, including those under professional codes of ethics, and explores the interrelationship of law, ethics and principles of sustainability. Note that BUSA 303 and 304 may not both be taken for credit. (4)

BUSA 305: Behavior in Organizations

Exploration of how to organize and manage in today's context of changing internal and external demands and expectations, with emphasis on group and individual dynamics, teamwork and related topics in managing human resources. Studies how tasks, processes, individuals, groups, and structure relate to one another and to effective organizational performance. (4)

BUSA 308: Principles of Marketing

Introduces the role of sustainable marketing in a global society. Topics covered include marketing planning, consumer behavior, marketing research and an emphasis on marketing mix decisions for firms and nonprofit organizations. (4)

BUSA 309: Creating Value in Operations

The holistic study of the organization and management of value producing processes in services, manufacturing, and other economic activities. (4)

BUSA 310: Information Systems and Database Management

Introduction to information technology and systems from a management perspective. Strategic use of technology and systems, and impacts on industry competition, corporate strategy, organization structure, and the firm's value creation process. Basic concepts, strategies, and features of database design and management and how database applications support managerial decision-making and business operations. (4)

BUSA 320: Accounting Information Systems

Study of the flow of accounting information through an enterprise, systems documentation, internal controls, and database applications in accounting. Prerequisite: BUSA 202. (4)

BUSA 321: Intermediate Accounting I

Concentrated study of the conceptual framework of accounting, valuation theories, asset and income measurement, and financial statement disclosures in the U.S. and abroad. Prerequisite: BUSA 203 or permission of the instructor. (4)

BUSA 322: Intermediate Accounting II

Advanced study of, and research on measurement and valuation of assets, liabilities and income, and financial statement disclosure issues. Includes evaluation of U.S. framework relative to those of other international frameworks. Prerequisite: BUSA 321. (4)

BUSA 323: Cost Accounting and Control Systems

A critical examination of systems for cost accounting and managerial control. Emphasis on development of skills to critique cost and control systems and to understand the dynamic relationship between systems, operations, strategy, and performance evaluation. Prerequisite: BUSA 203. (4)

BUSA 335: Investments and Portfolio Management

Theory and practice of securities (e.g., stocks, bonds, derivatives, hybrids) valuation as well as portfolio construction and evaluation. emphasis on applying classroom concepts in real-time to student-managed portfolios. Exposure to complicating factors including taxes, the risk-return relationship, pricing anomalies, and behavioral issues in investing. Prerequisite: BUSA 302. (4)

BUSA 337: International Finance and Risk Management

Management of cross-border financial issues, including managing exchange rates, accessing global capital markets, conducting foreign investment, and financing foreign trade. Techniques (e.g., options, swaps, futures, insurance) and firm decisions (degrees of economic, operating, and financial leverage) are considered both generally (to firm risk), and specifically to international issues. Prerequisite: BUSA 302. (4)

BUSA 340: Nonprofit Management

Overview of the nonprofit sector. Topics include: scope and context of the sector; operating strategies and organizing principles of nonprofit entities; management and leadership challenges unique to the sector such as HRM strategies and accountability mechanisms, working with volunteers, fundraising, ethics, and legal issues. Students will have the opportunity to engage with leaders of nonprofit organizations. No prerequisites and open to any major. (4)

BUSA 341: Nonprofit Financial Literacy

Introduction to financial reporting, budgeting and control and financial development for the nonprofit sector. Topics will include goals of financial management in the nonprofit sector, differences from reporting in the profit sector, safeguarding financial resources, revenue and expense budgets, and tax and payroll requirements. Prerequisite: BUSA 340.

BUSA 342: Managing Human Resources

HR's changing role in organizations, workforce planning, job analysis and design, staffing, talent and performance management, total rewards, retention, risk management, and employee and labor relations, with emphasis on employment law and managing diversity. Integration of globalization, ethics, HR metrics, and HR's use of technology. Prerequisite: BUSA 305 or permission of instructor. (4)

BUSA 352: Global Management

Integrated study of challenges faced by managers in large and small organizations as they do business globally. Competencies involved in communicating, negotiating, strategizing, organizing, making decisions, leading people, and managing a multicultural workforce across borders and cultures. Prerequisite: BUSA 305. (4)

BUSA 358: Entrepreneurship

Intensive study of issues and challenges associated with start-up, growth, and maturation of a new enterprise. Emphasizes reduction of risk through planning for and assessing possible future conditions. (4)

BUSA 361: e-Marketing

Provides an overview of marketing issues associated with marketing by electronic means, including the Internet, by businesses and nonprofit organizations. Explores how e-marketing fits in the organization's overall marketing strategy. Prerequisite: BUSA 308. (4)

BUSA 362: Sustainable Marketing

Investigates the environmental impact of marketing decisions of both product and service organizations as well as how marketing practices impact business sustainability. Addresses ethical concerns of overconsumption and materialism. For this class, sustainability refers to the organization accounting for its social, environmental and economic impacts. Prerequisite: BUSA 308 or permission of instructor for non-business majors. (4)

BUSA 363: Consumer Behavior

Processes involved as consumers gain awareness, establish purchasing criteria, screen information, make decisions and dispose of consumer goods, services, ideas or experiences. Consumer behavior will be examined to identify how it affects marketing, strategy and how marketing affects behavior. Prerequisite: BUSA 308. (4)

BUSA 364: Services Marketing

Addresses distinctive characteristics and principles associated with services enterprises. Model for identifying problems undermining service organization performance, and strategies to overcome and enhance services marketing organization performance. Prerequisite: BUSA 308. (4)

BUSA 387: Special Topics in Business Administration

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BUSA 388: Special Topics in Business Administration

Special Topics. (1 to 4)

BUSA 389: Special Topics in Business Administration

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BUSA 422: Consolidations and SEC Reporting

Concentrated study of equity measurement including the accounting aspects of partnerships, corporations, and consolidations. Also includes accounting for multinational corporations and SEC reporting. Prerequisite: BUSA 321. (4)

BUSA 423: Accounting for Nonprofits and Governmental Entities

Study of fund accounting, including its conceptual basis, its institutional standard setting, framework, and current principles and practices. Prerequisite: BUSA 321. (4)

BUSA 424: Auditing

Comprehensive study of auditing concepts and procedures. Recommended: BUSA 320 as prerequisite or co-requisite. (4)

BUSA 427: Tax Accounting

Study of income tax concepts, regulation and tax planning principles. Both individual income taxation and business taxation are discussed. (4)

BUSA 430: Finance for Entrepreneurial and Privately-Held Firms

Methods of financing and managing privately-held firms. Topics include private firm valuation issues, financing sources and methods, venture and private equity markets, and exit and outcomes for entrepreneurial and privately-held firms. Prerequisite: BUSA 302. (4)

BUSA 437: Financial Analysis and Strategy

Intermediate treatment of capital budgeting (and decision-making), valuation, forecasting, risk and return analysis, capital structure, and cost of capital. This course covers the essential tools of corporate finance, while illustrating corporate finance/corporate strategy interdependences through the use of cases. Prerequisite: BUSA 302. (4)

BUSA 438: Empirical Finance

Covers selected seminal finance theories, as well as relevant empirical methods. Applying empirical methods to test key asset pricing and corporate finance topics using real data. Theories covered and empirical methods employed will depend on instructor. Prerequisites: BUSA 302 and four hours from BUSA 335, 337, 430, or 437; or BUSA 302 and co-enrollment in one of BUSA 335, 337, 430, or 437; or permission of instructor. (4)

BUSA 440: Knowledge Management

Examines organizational mechanisms, leadership requirements, and technologies for leveraging knowledge and human performance. Foundations and practices for knowledge creation, transfer and integration, and role of knowledge management in the various management disciplines. Prerequisites: BUSA 305, 310. (4)

BUSA 442: Leading Organizational Improvement

Development of leader competencies and practices that promote organizational development and change, employee involvement and teamwork, culture change, and continuous organization learning and problem solving. Prerequisites: BUSA 305, 342. (4)

BUSA 449: Strategic Human Resource Management

Seminar course on topics of strategic transformation: HRM as a decision science to measure its impact and build competitive advantage and workforce engagement in alignment with organizational strategy, and internal/external environments. Advanced business students, in consultation with the instructor, select appropriate topics for research and discussion. Prerequisite: BUSA 305. Co-requisite: BUSA 342 or permission of instructor. (4)

BUSA 460: International Marketing

Introduction to marketing problems and opportunities in an international context. Investigation of economic, cultural, and business forces that require changes in marketing plans for international companies. Prerequisites: BUSA 308 or permission of instructor for non-business majors. (4)

BUSA 467: Marketing Research

Investigation of techniques and uses of marketing research in the business decision-making process. Research design, survey methods, sampling plans, data analysis, and field projects. Prerequisites: BUSA 308. (4)

BUSA 468: Marketing Management

Choosing target markets, acquiring and keeping customers by creating, delivering and communicating customer value. The course may include a service-learning project. Prerequisites: BUSA 308, 363, 467. (4)

BUSA 485: Study Away in Business

PLU-sponsored academic or experiential study in other countries. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. (1 to 32)

BUSA 486: Study Away in Business

PLU-sponsored academic or experiential study in other countries. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. (1 to 32)

BUSA 486A: SA: Business Culture in China - C

Study away in China, focusing on the changing business environment and business culture in leading urban centers. New policies, practices and markets as China's economy evolves. Visits to enterprises and cultural-historical sites, meetings with managers and local experts on contemporary Chinese culture and business. Junior standing or permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. (4)

BUSA 487: Special Topics in Business Administration

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

BUSA 488: Special Topics in Business Administration

Seminar on specifically selected topics in business. (1 to 4)

BUSA 489: Special Topics in Business Administration

Seminar on specifically selected topics in business. (1 to 4)

BUSA 491: Independent Study

Individualized studies in consultation with an instructor. Prerequisites: Junior standing, instructor approval, and approval by dean or his/her designate. (1 to 4)

BUSA 495: Internship

Application of business knowledge in field setting. Credit granted determined by hours spent in working environment and depth of project associated with the course of study. Internships do not apply to concentration requirements. Pass/Fail. (1 to 4)

BUSA 499: Capstone: Strategic Management - SR

Capstone seminar for business majors. Strategic decision-making by integrating all business functions to formulate and implement business policies and strategies to achieve organizational objectives; apply appropriate methodologies, concepts, and tools pertinent to strategic analyses and discuss implications of industry structure, organization resources and capabilities, business ethics and social responsibility, sustainability, and global competitive conditions in selecting courses of action. Prerequisites: BUSA 302, 303 or 304, 305, 308, 309, 310, and senior standing. Last semester or permission of dean or his/her designate. (4)

CHEM 104: Environmental Chemistry - NS, SM

Basic principles of chemistry and reactions, with applications to human activities and the natural environment. Includes laboratory. No prerequisites; students without high school chemistry are encouraged to take CHEM 104 before taking CHEM 105 or CHEM 115. Also suitable for environmental studies, general science teachers, B.A. in geosciences, and general university core requirements. (4)

CHEM 105: Chemistry of Life - NS, SM

Basic organic and biochemistry applied to chemical processes in human systems; suitable for liberal arts students, nursing students, physical education majors, and prospective teachers. Students who have not completed high school chemistry recently should take CHEM 104 before taking CHEM 105. (4)

CHEM 115: General Chemistry I - NS, SM

Topics explored include the structure of matter, nomenclature, atomic and molecular theory, periodic relationships, states of matter, quantitative relationships, and thermochemistry. The course includes laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry. Co-requisite: MATH 140 or math placement in MATH 151 or higher. (4)

CHEM 116: General Chemistry II - NS, SM

Introduces students to chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry thermodynamics, electrochemistry, chemistry of the elements, and coordination compounds. The course includes laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: MATH 140 or higher and CHEM 115. (4)

CHEM 287: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 288: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 289: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

CHEM 320: Analytical Chemistry

Chemical methods of quantitative analysis, including volumetric, gravimetric, and selected instrumental methods. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 116; MATH 140. (4)

CHEM 331: Organic Chemistry I

An introduction to structure, reactivity, and general properties of organic molecules. Prequisite: CHEM 116. Co-requisite: CHEM 333. (4)

CHEM 332: Organic Chemistry II

Chemistry of aromatic compounds, carbonyl-containing functional groups, amines, phenols, and an introduction to biologically important molecules. Prerequisites: CHEM 331 and 333. Co-requisite: CHEM 334 or 336. (4)

CHEM 333: Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

Reactions and methods of synthesis, separation and analysis of organic compounds. Microscale techniques. Practical investigation of reactions and classes of compounds discussed in CHEM 331. Co-requisite: CHEM 331. (1)

CHEM 334: Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

Synthesis of organic compounds, including instrumental and spectroscopic analyses. Practical investigation of reactions and classes of compounds discussed in CHEM 332. Prerequisite: CHEM 333. Co-requisite: CHEM 332. (1)

CHEM 336: Organic Special Projects Laboratory

Individual projects emphasizing current professional-level methods of synthesis and property determination of organic compounds. This course is an alternative to CHEM 334 and typically requires somewhat more time commitment. Students who wish to prepare for careers in chemistry or related areas should apply for departmental approval of their admission to this course. Co-requisite: CHEM 332. (1)

CHEM 341: Physical Chemistry

A study of the relationship between the energy content of systems, work, and the physical and chemical properties of matter. Classical and statistical thermodynamics, thermochemistry, solution properties, phase equilibria, and chemical kinetics. Prerequisites: CHEM 116, MATH 152, PHYS 154. (4)

CHEM 342: Physical Chemistry - NS, SM

A study of the physical properties of atoms, molecules and ions, and their correlation with structure. Classical and modern quantum mechanics, bonding theory, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHEM 116, MATH 152, PHYS 154. (4)

CHEM 343: Physical Chemistry Laboratory - NS, SM

Experiments in kinetics and thermodynamics. Attention given to data handling, error analysis, instrumentation, computational analysis, and correlation with theory. Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 341. (1)

CHEM 344: Physical Chemistry Laboratory

Experiments in molecular structure and spectroscopy. Attention given to data handling, error analysis, instrumentation, computational analysis, and correlation with theory. Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 342. (1)

CHEM 387: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 388: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 389: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 403: Biochemistry I

An overview of the structures, function, and regulation of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, and an introduction to metabolic and regulatory cellular processes. Majors are encouraged to take both CHEM 403 and 405 for a comprehensive exposure to biochemical theory and techniques. Prerequisites: CHEM 332 and 334 (or 336) (4)

CHEM 405: Biochemistry II

A continuation of CHEM 403 that provides further insight into cellular metabolism and regulation, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms of catalysis, protein synthesis, nucleic acid chemistry, and biotechnology. Concepts introduced in Physical Chemistry and Biochemistry I will be applied to this course. Laboratory designed to stimulate creativity and problem-solving abilities through the use of modern biochemical techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 403. (3)

CHEM 410: Introduction to Research

An introduction to laboratory research techniques, use of the chemical literature, including computerized literature searching, research proposal and report writing. Students develop an independent chemical research problem chosen in consultation with a member of the chemistry faculty. Students attend seminars as part of the course requirement. (2)

CHEM 420: Instrumental Analysis

Theory and practice of instrumental methods along with basic electronics. Special emphasis placed on electronics, spectrophotometric, chromatographic, and mass spectrometric methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 320; 341 and/or CHEM 342; 343. (4)

CHEM 440: Advanced Organic Chemistry

Students will develop a repertoire of synthetic methodology and a general understanding of a variety of organic reaction mechanisms. Synthetic organic strategies and design, the analysis of classic and recent total syntheses from the literature, and advanced applications of instrumentation in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 332. (2)

CHEM 450: Inorganic Chemistry

Techniques of structural determination (IR, UV, VIS, NMR, X-ray, EPR), bonding principles, nonmetal compounds, coordination chemistry, organometallics, donor/acceptor concepts, reaction pathways and biochemical applications are covered. Laboratory: Synthesis and characterization of non-metal, coordination and organometallic compounds. Prerequisites: CHEM 332, 341; Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 342. (3)

CHEM 456: Polymers and Biopolymers

A course presenting the fundamentals of polymer synthesis, solution thermodynamic properties, molecular characterization, molecular weight distribution, and solution kinetics. Free radical, condensation, ionic, and biopolymer systems, with emphasis on applications. The one-credit laboratory examining polymer synthesis through experiments is optional. Prerequisite: CHEM 341; Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 342. (3)

CHEM 487: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 488: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 489: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 491: Independent Studies

Library and/or laboratory study of topics not included in regularly offered courses. Proposed project must be approved by department chair and supervisory responsibility accepted by an instructor. May be taken more than once. A specific title for the project may be appended to the general title of Independent Studies for CHEM 491. (1 to 4)

CHEM 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

CHEM 497: Research

Experimental or theoretical investigation open to upper-division students with consent of department chair. May be taken more than once. Generally consists of a research project developed in consultation with a chemistry faculty member. A specific title for the project may be appended to the general title of Research for CHEM 497. (1 to 4)

CHEM 499A: Capstone Seminar I - SR

Students are trained in the practice of scientific writing and presentation by initiation of a project developed through independent library or laboratory research under the mentorship of a faculty advisor. Effective oral presentation skills are critically evaluated in seminars by practicing scientists and fellow students. Participation by all senior chemistry majors is required. With CHEM 499B, meets the senior seminar/project requirement. (1)

CHEM 499B: Capstone Seminar II - SR

Continuation of CHEM 499A with emphasis on completion of an independent library or laboratory research project with a faculty advisor. This includes presentation of their research in a department seminar and submission of the final capstone paper. Participation by all senior chemistry majors is required. With CHEM 499A meets the senior seminar/project requirements. (1)

CHIN 101: Elementary Chinese

Introduction to Mandarin Chinese. Basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory practice required. (4)

CHIN 102: Elementary Chinese

Introduction to Mandarin Chinese. Basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory practice required. Prerequisite: CHIN 101. (4)

CHIN 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar: China through Film

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

CHIN 201: Intermediate Chinese - C

Develops further the ability to communicate in Mandarin Chinese, using culturally authentic material. Laboratory practice required. Prerequisite: CHIN 102 or equivalent. (4)

CHIN 202: Intermediate Chinese - C

Develops further the ability to communicate in Mandarin Chinese, using culturally authentic material. Laboratory practice required. Prerequisite: CHIN 102 or equivalent. (4)

CHIN 271: China Through Film - AR, C

An exploration of the history and recent directions of Chinese cinema, the relationship between film and other Chinese media, film and the Chinese government, and the particular appeal of Chinese film on the international market. No prior study of Chinese required. Cross-listed with THEA 271. (4)

CHIN 287: Special Topics in Chinese

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHIN 288: Special Topics in Chinese

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHIN 289: Special Topics in Chinese

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHIN 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

CHIN 301: Composition and Conversation - C

Review of grammar with emphasis on idiomatic usage; reading of contemporary authors as models of style; and conversation on topics of student interest. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 202. (4)

CHIN 302: Composition and Conversation - C

Review of grammar with emphasis on idiomatic usage; reading of contemporary authors as models of style; and conversation on topics of student interest. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 202. (4)

CHIN 371: Chinese Literature in Translation - C, LT

An introduction to the most important works and writers of Chinese literary traditions, from early times to the modern period. Poetry, prose, drama, and fiction included. Film presentations supplement the required readings. No knowledge of Chinese required. (4)

CHIN 387: Special Topics in Chinese

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHIN 388: Special Topics in Chinese

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHIN 389: Special Topics in Chinese

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHIN 487: Special Topics in Chinese

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHIN 488: Special Topics in Chinese

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHIN 489: Special Topics in Chinese

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHIN 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

CHIN 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

CHLC 336: Childhood and Culture

Examines representations and perceptions of childhood and youth. Readings and assignments may cover literary texts (the novel, poetry, memoir); other media (theater, cinema, visual arts, music); or areas of cultural expression including religion, philosophy, psychology, etc. Open to all students; required for CHLC minors. (4)

CHSP 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

CHSP 250: Urban Culture in China - C

Explores first hand the dynamic and rapidly transforming cultural life of four major Chinese cities: Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Hong Kong. Our explorations will be carried out through face-toface meetings with contemporary artists and writers, as well as visits to culturally significant sites that form the background and context for artistic expression in China today. The urban focus will foreground tensions within China's major cities between global and local forces, and the ways in which those tensions are profitably transformed into contemporary art of all kinds. (4)

CHSP 287: Special Topics in Chinese Studies

Special Topics. (4)

CHSP 288: Special Topics in Chinese Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHSP 289: Special Topics in Chinese Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHSP 350: Chinese Culture and Society

This course will draw together the existing experiential components of the semester abroad program in Chengdu - orientation, service learning and the study tour - and focus them on the topic of an individual research project. The primary methodology of this project will be interviews with individuals in China, along with analysis of various Chinese media. (4)

CHSP 387: Special Topics in Chinese Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHSP 388: Special Topics in Chinese Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHSP 389: Special Topics in Chinese Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHSP 487: Special Topics in Chinese Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHSP 488: Special Topics in Chinese Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHSP 489: Special Topics in Chinese Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHSP 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

CHSP 499: Capstone: Senior Project - SR

A project, thesis, or internship which demonstrates competence in language and other dimensions of Chinese Studies. Must be approved in advance by chair of the Chinese Studies Program; tally card required. Upon prior application of the student, seminars in other departments or programs may substitute for this course. (4)

CLAS 190: FYEP190: Freshman Inquiry Seminar

A four credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

CLAS 231: Masterpieces of European Literature - LT

Representative works of classical, medieval, and early Renaissance literature. Cross-listed with ENGL 231. (4)

CLAS 241: Special Topics in Ancient Literature and Culture

An opportunity to pursue in-depth such topics as late antiquity and the rise of Christianity, ancient medicine and technology, specific literary genres. May be repeated for credit with different topic. (4)

CLAS 287: Special Topics in Classics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CLAS 288: Special Topics in Classics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CLAS 289: Special Topics in Classics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CLAS 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

CLAS 321: Greek Civilization

The political, social, and cultural history of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. Special attention to the literature, art, and intellectual history of the Greeks. Cross-listed with HIST 321. (4)

CLAS 322: Roman Civilization

The history of Rome from the foundation of the city to CE 395, the death of Theodosius the Great. Emphasis on Rome's expansion over the Mediterranean and on its constitutional history. Attention to the rise of Christianity within a Greco-Roman context. Cross-listed with HIST 322. (4)

CLAS 326: A History of Medicine: Antiquity to European Renaissance

An investigation of medical history from antiquity to the European Renaissance (c. 1660) through an examination of Greco-Roman, Islamic, Byzantine, and European traditions and their attendant concepts of health, healing, and disease. Cross-listed with HIST 326. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or instructor permission. (4)

CLAS 341: Special Topics in Ancient Literature and Culture

An opportunity to pursue in-depth such topics as late antiquity and the rise of Christianity, ancient medicine and technology, specific literary genres. May be repeated for credit with different topic. (4)

CLAS 350: Classical and Comparative Mythology - LT

A literary study of myths and of the methodologies used to interpret their origin, function, and meaning. This study originates in the texts of Greco-Roman authors and includes comparisons with other world myths. All readings are in English, but students with other language abilities are encouraged to use them. (4)

CLAS 387: Special Topics in Classics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CLAS 388: Special Topics in Classics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CLAS 389: Special Topics in Classics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CLAS 487: Special Topics in Classics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CLAS 488: Special Topics in Classics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CLAS 489: Special Topics in Classics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CLAS 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

CLAS 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

CLAS 499: Capstone: Senior Project - SR

To enable senior students in an academic unit to share their work and receive group criticism. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Capstone and may be followed by a specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

COMA 101: Introduction to Communication

Introduces the study of human communication. Students will learn and apply a wide array of analytical theory and techniques across diverse human experiences from interpersonal to public communication and mass communication contexts to become more aware and effective communicators. (4)

COMA 102: Communication Ethics

Studies the basic principles of moral philosphy and explores ethical issues involving those engaged in communication professions such as journalism, public relations, broadcasting, and advertising. Students use case studies to learn to recognize ethical dilemmas and develop strategies for dealing with them. (2)

COMA 120: Media in the World - AR

Introduces the critical study of mass communication and its influence on community and culture. The course will survey how the technical, economic and behavioral elements of media influence its structure and content. (4)

COMA 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

COMA 211: Debate

This course introduces the practice of academic and political debate. It introduces principles and theories of argument. Students will have opportunities for in-class and public debates. (2)

COMA 212: Public Speaking

Introduces the basic techniques of public speaking. Students complete several speeches and learn the basic skills of speechmaking, including topic selections, research, organization, audience analysis, and delivery. Required of all Design/Tech majors. (2)

COMA 213: Communication Writing

Examines principles of clear written expression that are needed for communication coursework and in communication-related careers. Focus is on writing mechanics, style, documentation formats, database searching, making claims clearly, and supporting claims with evidence in ways that are appropriate to context, purpose and audience. (2)

COMA 214: Group Communication

Studies how people interact in groups. Introduces theoretical constructs regarding the role of groups in organizational and social settings. Provides experience in analyzing and improving group performance and interaction. (2)

COMA 215: Writing in Communication Careers

Introduces students to the fundamental standards and expectations in communication writing. Includes styles and formats routinely used in both academic and professional communication writing and research. Also includes writing for multiple audiences. Reviews basic grammar, sentence and paragraph structures. This course will conclude with an EXIT EXAM (grammar/syntax/clarity) that must be passed to proceed to any major/concentration in the department. (4)

COMA 225: Practicum

One semester hour credit may be earned each semester, but only four semester hours may be used to meet university requirements. Students put classroom theory to practical application by individually completing a project relating to an aspect of communication. An instructor in the area of interest must approve the project and agree to provide guidance. (1)

COMA 235: Communication in Professional Settings

This course explores oral and written communication in the workplace by blending theory with practical application and skill development. Communication behavior in organizations, writing in professional contexts, interviewing; group communication; and public presentations will be examined. (4)

COMA 275: Digital Arts Lab

Students explore the processes involved in preparing messages for visual presentation. Integrates design concepts with technical applications in print, web and video presentation. Includes open lab opportunity. (2)

COMA 287: Special Topics in Communication

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

COMA 288: Special Topics in Communication

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

COMA 289: Special Topics in Communication

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

COMA 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

COMA 301: Media and Cultural Criticism

This course examines the role of media in producing systems of meanings and artifacts that shape popular culture and ideology. Students learn to use critical perspectives as lenses for studying texts of popular culture and for writing cultural criticism for popular and specialized audiences. (4)

COMA 302: Media Ethics

Applies principles of moral philosophy to ethical issues involving those engaged within mass communication professions. Emphasis on encountering and resolving contemporary ethical issues in mass communication environments. Prerequisites: COMA 102 and 120. (2)

COMA 303: Gender and Communication - A

This course examines the relationship between gender and communication in human interaction and media representations. Comparison and contrast of male and female communication styles, language usage and speech practices. Role of media in shaping gender ideals and possibilities. Prerequisites: COMA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. (4)

COMA 304: Intercultural Communication - C

Studies the nature of communication among people of diverse cultures. The course examines contemporary theory and research and examines a variety of cultural variables including: cultural backgrounds, perception, social organization, language, and nonverbal aspects of messages. Prerequisites: COMA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. (4)

COMA 305: Argument and Advocacy

Studies how people use reason giving in social decision-making. Analysis of genres, forms, and techniques of arguers. Focus is on methods of creating, understanding, and criticizing arguments. (4)

COMA 306: Persuasion

The study of persuasion as a means of personal and social influence through rhetoric. Examines both rhetorical and social scientific traditions of study, ethical and social implications of contemporary persuasion in political, commercial and other contexts. Opportunity for original research projects. Prerequisites: COMA 101, 102, 120, 213 or consent of instructor. (4)

COMA 312: Advanced Public Speaking

Focuses on improving skill in public speaking. Introduces theories and techniques for effectively participating in various speaking contexts. Provides experience through writing and delivering a range of different kinds of public speeches. Prerequisites: COMA 101, 102, 212, or consent of instructor. (2)

COMA 313: Dialog

Explores the process of using dialog as a way of facilitating conflict resolution. Focus is on creating supportive communication climates and methods for listening. Prerequisites: COMA 101, 102, 212, 215 or consent of instructor (2)

COMA 321: The Book in Society

A critical study of the history of book culture and the role of books in modern society. Cross-listed with ENGL 311. (4)

COMA 322: Publishing Procedures

A workshop introduction to the world of book publishing, involving students in decisions about what to publish and how to produce it. Cross-listed with ENGL 312. (4)

COMA 340: Conflict and Communication

Studies the role of communication in the development and management of human and global conflict. Reserach and theories of prominent conflict and peace scholars along with significant case studies are used to analyze and understand sources of conflict and methods for building peace. Prerequisite: COMA 101 or consent of instructor. (4)

COMA 341: Journalism and Conflict

Surveys the theories, practices and ethical considerations for reporting on conflicts throughout the world. Conflict-sensitive (sometimes called Peace Journalism) journalism is an alternative journalistic paradigm which seeks to enhance public understanding of conflicts by broadening the coverage of conflict from a war journalism model which emphasizes the roles of governmental decision-makers, and battle-related news reporting to a conflict-sensitive model which emphasizes understanding the roots of conflict; the perspectives of all sides in the dispute; and the need for on-going coverage after the cessation of hostilities. (4)

COMA 342: Applied Research

An investigation of research methods critical to professional and academic communication. Key methods and constructs include informational interviewing, database search, survey and focus group design and administration, and basic data analysis. (4)

COMA 343: Multimedia Writing and Reporting

Introduces students to various professional methods of writing across multimedia platforms. Students will engage in research, organization and presentation of non-fiction multimedia stories. In addition, students will learn to evaluate various multimedia products. Prerequisite: COMA 215. (4)

COMA 344: Multimedia Research and Editing

Course incorporates contemporary methods, styles and formats used in comprehensive research and editing for multimedia products. Students will oversee development and design of non-fiction multimedia presentations while adhering to professional standards of media structure. Prerequisite: COMA 275. (4)

COMA 360: Public Relations Writing

Introduces principles and processes involved in writing for an organization's diverse publics. Integrates persuasive techniques and communication theory with writing and production practice. Prerequisites: COMA 101, 102, 212, 215 or consent of instructor. (4)

COMA 361: Public Relations: Principles and Practices

Introduces the theories, methods, and practice of public relations. Emphasizes technical and analytical skills. Prerequisites: COMA 101, 102, 212, 215 or consent of instructor. (4)

COMA 362: Principles of Advertising

Introduces advertising theories and principles. Focuses on case studies and skills required in advertising practice. Prerequisites: COMA 101, 102, 212, 215 or consent of instructor (4)

COMA 387: Topics in Communication

Special topics in communication s intended for unique opportunities to explore communication issues, methods, and viewpoints outside the normal curriculum. (1 to 4)

COMA 388: Topics in Communication

Special topics in communication is intended for unique opportunities to explore communication issues, methods, and viewpoints outside the normal curriculum. (1 to 4)

COMA 389: Topics in Communication

Special topics in communication is intended for unique opportunities to explore communication issues, methods, and viewpoints outside the normal curriculum (1 to 4)

COMA 391: Communication Abroad

Exploration of communication systems and environments beyond the university in international cultural contexts. (1 to 4)

COMA 393: Communication Abroad

Exploration of communication systems and environments beyond the university in international cultural contexts. (1 to 4)

COMA 399: Career Exploration

Introduces students through the process of educational planning. Focus is on internship preparedness and initial development of portfolio or other capstone projects. (1)

COMA 401: Visual Culture

Examines the central role of visual representation in contemporary culture and the ways in which we use, understand and are used by images. Emphasis on photography, film, television, new media, and commemorative art and architecture in the realms of advertising, politics, news, public advocacy and popular culture. Students will conduct research projects that analyze elements of visual culture. Prerequisites: COMA 101, 102, 212, 215 or consent of instruction. (4)

COMA 421: Communication Law

Focuses on the principles of communication law and its application to various communication practices. Examines court cases, federal and state statutes and First Amendment theories. Prerequisites: COMA 101, 102, 120, 212, 215 or consent of instructor. (4)

COMA 425: Communication Practicum

One semester hour credit may be earned each semester, but only four semester hours may be used to meet university requirements. Students put classroom theory to practical application by individually completing a project relating to an aspect of communication. An instructor in the area of interest must approve the project and agree to provide guidance. (1)

COMA 426: Application Seminar: MediaLab

Students engage in all aspects of multimedia productions for various constituents. Professional standards of production and ethics will be used to evaluate all productions. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Students must apply and be accepted for inclusion in this course/program. (2)

COMA 427: Application Seminar: Advanced Co-curricular Production

Students produce multimedia projects for various student media outlets. Professional standards of production and ethics will be used to evaluate all productions. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: COMA 275. (2)

COMA 441: Conflict and Peacebuilding

Through the use of case studies and significant scholarship, this course focuses on, analyzes, and develops approaches for conflict and peacebuilding in interpersonal, community, and global contexts. Prerequisite: COMA 101 or consent of instructor. (4)

COMA 442: Negotiation

Introduces the techniques necessary to break an impasse and reach an agreement. Skills include how to create an atmosphere that fosters negotiation, how to conduct difficult conversation and how to mediate "win-win" situations. (2)

COMA 461: Public Relations Planning and Management

Examination of public relations issues such as campaign planning, issue management, crisis communication, and global public relations. Integrates theoretical foundations and ethics. Focus on measurement and evaluation techniques. Prerequisite: COMA 361. (4)

COMA 487: Topics in Communication

Special topics in communication is intended for unique opportunities to explore communication issues, methods, and viewpoints outside the normal curriculum. (1 to 4)

COMA 488: Topics in Communication

Special topics in communication is intended for unique opportunities to explore communication issues, methods, and viewpoints outside the normal curriculum. (1 to 4)

COMA 489: Topics in Communication

Special topics in communication is intended for unique opportunities to explore communication issues, methods, and viewpoints outside the normal curriculum. (1 to 4)

COMA 491: Independent Studies

Investigations or research in area of special interest not covered by regular courses; open to qualified junior or senior students. A student should not begin registration for independent study until the specific area for investigation has been approved by a departmental sponsor. (1 to 4)

COMA 492: Independent Studies

Investigations or research in area of special interest not covered by regular courses; open to qualified junior or senior students. A student should not begin registration for independent study until the specific area for investigation has been approved by a departmental sponsor. (1 to 4)

COMA 493: Independent Studies

Investigations or research in area of special interest not covered by regular courses; open to qualified junior or senior students. A student should not begin registration for independent study until the specific area for investigation has been approved by a departmental sponsor. (1 to 4)

COMA 495: Internship

The internship experience is designed to combine classroom theory with practical application through job-related experiences. (1 to 12)

COMA 499: Capstone - SR

The capstone focuses on integrating student-learning objectives with student experience through development and presentation of portfolio or projects. Students will make a public presentation of their capstone. (2)

COOP 276: Full-Time Internship

A supervised educational experience in a work setting on a full-time basis. Student must work at least 360 hours in their internship. Intended for students who have not declared a major or who are seeking an exploratory experience. Requires the completion of a Learning Agreement in consultation with a faculty sponsor. (12)

COOP 476: Full Time Internship

A supervised educational experience in a work setting on a full-time basis. Student must work at least 360 hours in their internship. Intended for students enrolled in a major or who are seeking a professional experience. Requires the completion of a Learning Agreement in consultation with a faculty sponsor. (12)

COOP 477: International Work Experience

To be arranged and approved through the Wang Center for Global Education and a faculty sponsor. Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of one full year (32 credits) in residence prior to the program start. Recommended: A minimum GPA of 3.00, relevant work experience or academic background, language competency and significant cross-cultural experience. (1 to 12)

CSCE 115: Solve It With the Computer - MR, NS

Teaches how computer use combined with mathematical reasoning can solve "real world" problems. Students use computer tools to solve everyday problems involving mathematics, data, and computing. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of PLU entrance requirement in mathematics. (4)

CSCE 120: Computerized Information Systems - NS

Introduction to computers including net-centric computing, computer ethics, operation systems, spreadsheets, graphics, and related topics. Includes a computer laboratory component. Prerequisite: MATH 128 or 140 or equivalent. (4)

CSCE 131: Introduction to Engineering - NS

An introduction to the engineering profession and development of basic skills important to the profession, including problem solving, engineering design, graphics, use of computers, computer programming, engineering economics, and ethics in engineering. Prerequisite: Completion of college-preparatory mathematics. (2)

CSCE 144: Introduction to Computer Science - NS

An introduction to computer science including problem solving, algorithm design, object-oriented programming, numerical and non-numerical applications, and use of data files. Ethical and social impacts of computing. Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics or MATH 140 or equivalent. (4)

CSCE 190: FYEP190: Privacy and Technology - NS

This course will explore the impact of technology on privacy. The goal is to provide students with insight into the importance of privacy in their daily lives and how to protect that privacy as it comes under attack from new technology. It will explore these issues from several different perspectives, including a look at the history of privacy, the development of laws related to privacy, methods used to protect privacy, and developments in technology that threaten privacy. In the process students will study concepts from mathematics, computer science, history, political science, English and military science. (4)

CSCE 231: Digital Systems

Analysis of digital design techniques including coverage of combinational logic, circuit timing, sequential logic, counters, and finite state machines. The hardware description language VHDL will be taught and used in several projects. Includes a computer laboratory component that explores the relevant digital logic through simulation and hardware implementations. Prerequisite: CSCE 144. (4)

CSCE 270: Data Structures

Study of object-oriented programming techniques and fundamental data structure abstractions and implementations including list, stack, queue, and trees with applications to sorting, searching, and data storage. Prerequisite: CSCE 144. (4)

CSCE 287: Special Topics in Computer Science and Computer Engineering

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CSCE 288: Special Topics in Computer Science and Computer Engineering

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CSCE 289: Special Topics in Computer Science and Computer Engineering

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CSCE 291: Independent Studies

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. Prerequisite: Consent of department chair. (1 to 4)

CSCE 320: Software Engineering

An engineering approach to the development of large software packages. Topics include software requirements definition, object-oriented design and programming, specifications, and software testing. Consideration of societal and ethical issues surrounding software engineering. Major small group project. Prerequisite: CSCE 270. (4)

CSCE 330: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

An introduction to concepts of artificial intelligence (AI), including expert systems, natural language processing, image understanding, and problem solving techniques. Consideration of the ethical and social dilemmas posed by AI. The programming languages LISP and PROLOG will be taught and used in several projects. Prerequisite: CSCE 270. (4)

CSCE 331: Electrical Circuits

Introduction to the fundamental techniques and concepts of analysis and design of DC and AC circuits including Kirchhoff's Laws, circuit theorems, OP Amps, first and second order transient and steady state circuits, and frequency response. Computer simulation and laboratory work are essential parts of the course. Prerequisites: MATH 151; PHYS 154 or consent of instructor. (4)

CSCE 340: Formal Languages

Study of formal models of computation (finite automata, pushdown automata, and Turing machines). Study of formal language concepts, such as regular expressions and grammars. There will be a significant programming component where students implement and test algorithms. Prerequisite: CSCE 270. (4)

CSCE 343: Programming Language Concepts

A study and comparison of features found in different computer languages. Imperative object-oriented, functional and declarative languages will be studied. Programs written in several of the languages. Includes a computer laboratory component. Prerequisite: CSCE 270. (4)

CSCE 345: Microelectronics

Introduction to microelectronic technology and integrated circuit analysis and design based on BJT and MOSFET devices. Analog and digital applications are discussed. Topics include: single and multistage filters and amplifiers, frequency response, feedback concepts, digital logic and memory circuits. Computer simulation and laboratory work are essential parts of the course. Prerequisite: CSCE 331. (4)

CSCE 367: Database Management

An introduction to the fundamental concepts necessary for design, use, and implementation of database systems. The entity-relationship and relational models are studied in detail. Individual, organization, and societal concerns related to accuracy and privacy of data. Major small group project. Prerequisite: CSCE 144 Recommended: CSCE 270. (4)

CSCE 371: Design and Analysis of Algorithms

Elementary data structures reviewed for efficiency under different conditions. Analysis of problems associated with searching and sorting. This course will also include analysis of advanced data structures including Hash Tables, and Height-balanced trees. It will include the study of algorithms for graph theory, heuristic search, and other topics selected by the instructor. There will be a significant programming component where students will implement and test algorithms. Prerequisites: CSCE 270, MATH 245. (4)

CSCE 380: Computer Organization and Assembly Language

Fundamentals of assembly programming and low-level computer organization. Instruction sets for RISC and CISC processors are analyzed and compared qualitatively and quantitatively. Topics include data and instruction formats, addressing, subroutines, macro definition, basic computer architecture, benchmarking, and interface between assembly language and high-level programming languages. Prerequisite: CSCE 270. Strongly recommended: CSCE 231. (4)

CSCE 385: Computer Architecture

An introduction to the structure and operation of large computer systems. Topics include information representation of instructions and data, memory structure, datapath and control unit organization and design, pipelining, and multiprocessing systems. Lab component includes designing and testing computer systems in simulation and on reprogrammable hardware. Prerequisites: CSCE 231, CSCE 380. (4)

CSCE 386: Computer Networks

An introduction to computer networks and computer communication protocols from the physical layer through the transport layer. Topics include connection oriented and connectionless networks, error detection and correction, LANs, sockets, and routing. Application layer topics can include HTTP, DNS, and email. Prerequisite: CSCE 270. Recommended: CSCE 231, MATH 242. (4)

CSCE 387: Special Topics in Computer Science and Computer Engineering

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CSCE 388: Special Topics in Computer Science and Computer Engineering

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CSCE 389: Special Topics in Computer Science and Computer Engineering

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CSCE 391: Problem Solving and Programming Seminar

Designed to improve advanced problem solving and programming skills, including advanced data structures. A goal of the course is participation in the regional ACM programming competition. Pass/Fail only. Students may take this course more than once. Prerequisite: CSCE 270 or consent of instructor. (1)

CSCE 412: Computer Graphics

A study of the techniques and theory used to generate computer graphics. Both two-and three-dimensional representations will be covered. Course work includes several programming assignments plus a project. Prerequisites: CSCE 270, MATH 152. Recommended: PHYS 153. (4)

CSCE 444: Operating Systems

An introduction to computer operating systems including process scheduling, memory management, and file systems. Major small group project. Prerequisite: CSCE 380, MATH 245. Recommended: CSCE 343. (4)

CSCE 480: Microprocessors and Embedded Systems

Study of microprocessors and their use in microcomputer embedded systems. Includes a computer laboratory component focusing on advanced computer architecture topics and incorporating a microcontroller-based project. Prerequisite: CSCE 385 or permission of the instructor. (4)

CSCE 487: Special Topics in Computer Science and Computer Engineering

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CSCE 488: Special Topics in Computer Science and Computer Engineering

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CSCE 489: Special Topics in Computer Science and Computer Engineering

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CSCE 491: Independent Studies

Prerequisite: Consent of department chair. (1 to 4)

CSCE 495: Computer Science Internship

Involvement in an ongoing research project in computer science under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (1 to 4)

CSCE 499A: Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR

Written and oral presentation of a project in a topic of interest by the student under the supervision of a faculty member. Students normally work in small groups (two or three students). Includes discussion of the skills needed for good research and technical communication of that research and a study of the social implications of computing. The capstone is a two-semester sequence beginning in the fall semester. May graduates should start the course in the fall of their senior year and December graduates should begin the course in the fall of their junior year. There are two semester hours given each term for a total of four semester hours. Prerequisites: Requirements and prerequisites depend on the major and degree. 1) The B.S. in computer science - design and implement a significant software program and requires CSCE 320; 2) The B.S. in computer engineering - design and implement a significant hardware component and requires CSCE 231, 270, 345; and 3) The B.A. in computer science - same as the B.S. in computer science or write a research paper and requires CSCE 270. (2)

CSCE 499B: Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR

See description for CSCE 499A. (2)

DANC 170: Introduction to Dance - AR

This is a survey dance course that explores the history, roots, and cultural significance of dance as an art form. (4)

DANC 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

DANC 222: Jazz Dance Level I - PE

Cross-listed with PHED 222. (1)

DANC 240: Dance Ensemble - PE

Cross-listed with PHED 240. (1)

DANC 287: Special Topics in Dance

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

DANC 288: Special Topics in Dance

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

DANC 289: Special Topics in Dance

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

DANC 362: Healing Arts of the Mind and Body - AR

Designed to introduce alternative therapies of mind-body processes. History, roots, practice, and cultural significances of several therapies and practices. Cross-listed with KINS 362. (4)

DANC 387: Special Topics in Dance

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

DANC 388: Special Topics in Dance

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

DANC 389: Special Topics in Dance

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

DANC 462: Dance Production

An advanced choreography course combining choreography, costume design, staging, and publicity techniques for producing a major dance concert. Cross-listed with KINS 462. (2)

DANC 487: Special Topics in Dance

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

DANC 488: Special Topics in Dance

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

DANC 489: Special Topics in Dance

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

DANC 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics - SO

Introduces the study of economic decision making by firms and individuals. Economic tools and concepts such as markets, supply and demand, and efficiency applied to contemporary issues. Students cannot take both ECON 101 and 111 for credit. (4)

ECON 102: Principles of Macroeconomics - SO

Introduces the economy as a whole and major issues such as inflation, unemployment, economic growth, and international trade. Prerequisite: ECON 101 or 111 (4)

ECON 111: Principles of Microeconomics: Global and Environmental - SO

Analysis of public policy and private behavior; appropriate pricing, resource valuation, taxes and subsidies, trade policies, sustainable development, and income growth and distribution. Students cannot take both ECON 101 and 111 for credit. (4)

ECON 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

ECON 287: Special Topics in Economics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ECON 288: Special Topics in Economics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ECON 289: Special Topics in Economics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ECON 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

ECON 301: Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

Theory of consumer behavior; product and factor prices under conditions of monopoly, competition, and intermediate markets; welfare economics. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111, or consent of instructor; and MATH 128 or 151. (4)

ECON 302: Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

National income determination including policy implications within the institutional framework of the U.S. economy. Prerequisites: ECON 102; MATH 128 or 151. (4)

ECON 311: Energy and Natural Resource Economics

An intensive economic analysis of natural resource scarcity and a comparison of actual, optimal and sustainable use of energy and natural resources. Comparative international analysis of the relative roles of markets and government in the development and allocation of natural resources over time. Themes include dynamic efficiency, intergenerational fairness, and sustainability. Case studies of key natural resource sectors including: renewable and exhaustible energy, non-energy minerals, forestry, and fisheries. Prerequisities: ECON 101 or 111 or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 313: Environmental Economics

Examines the theory of externalities, pollution regulation, open-access conditions as a basis for environmental degradation, methods of non-market valuation of environmental amenities, and valuation of a statistical life. Attention will be given to both domestic and global examples. Prerequisities: ECON 101 or 111, or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 315: Investigating Environmental and Economic Change in Europe - SO

An introduction to the environmental economic problems and policy prospects of modern Europe. Focus on economic incentives and policies to solve problems of air and water pollution, sustainable forestry, global warming, and wildlife management in Austria, Germany, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Italy. Prerequisite: ECON 101 or 111, or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 321: Labor Economics - SO

Analysis of labor markets and labor market issues; wage determination; investment in human capital, unionism and collective bargaining; law and public policy; discrimination; labor mobility; earnings inequality, unemployment, and wages and inflation. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111, or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 322: Money and Banking - SO

The nature and role of money; monetary theory; tools and implementation of monetary policy; regulation of intermediaries; banking activity in financial markets; international consequences of and constraints on monetary policy. Prerequisite: ECON 102 or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 323: Health Economics - SO

Analysis of health care markets including hospitals, providers, and insurer/managed care organizations; demand for care; economics of insurance; role of government and regulation; access to care; non-price competition; impact of new technology; analysis of reform. Prerequisities: ECON 101 or 111 or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 325: Industrial Organization and Public Policy

An analysis of the structure, conduct, and performance of American industry and public policies that foster and alter industrial structure and behavior. Prerequisities: ECON 101, 111, or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 327: Public Finance - SO

Public taxation and expenditure at all governmental levels; the incidence of taxes, the public debt and the provision of public goods such as national defense, education, pure air, and water. Prerequisites: ECON 101, 111 or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 331: International Trade and Commercial Policy

Theories of trade based on labor productivity, factor endowments, and scale economies. Welfare analysis of commercial policy instruments. Political economy of interest groups and trade policy. Critical analysis of multilateral efforts to promote trade. Theoretical and empirical linkages among trade policy, renewable resource depletion, and environmental degradation. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111, or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 333: Economic Development: Comparative Third World Strategies - C

Analysis of the theoretical framework for development with applications to alternative economic development strategies used in the newly emerging developing countries. Emphasis on comparison between countries, assessments of the relative importance of cultural values, historical experience, and governmental policies in the development process. Prerequisites: ECON 101, 111 or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 335: European Economic Integration

An introduction to integration theory and its application to the problems and policy prospects for deepening European integration. Economic analysis of the development of economic institutions in the European Union. Topics include: German unification, enlargement, the European monetary system, Scandinavian participation, and relevance of the European integration model for the developing world. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111 or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 337: International Macroeconomics

An introduction to international macroeconomic theory and policy, including the balance of payments accounts, foreign exchange markets, theory of exchange rates, policies under fixed and flexible exchange rates, economic integration, global financial crises, policy coordination. Prerequisite: ECON 102 or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 341: Strategic Behavior - SO

An introduction to game theory and analysis of interactive decision processes. Interactive game playing, cases, and examples drawn primarily from economics, but also includes sports, political science, business, and biology. Prisoner's Dilemma, sequential games, Nash equilibrium, mixed and pure strategies, collective action and bidding strategies, bargaining. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111 or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 344: Econometrics

Introduction to the methods and tools of econometrics as the basis for applied research in economics. Specification, estimation, and testing in the classical linear regression model. Prerequisite: ECON 101 or 111; ECON 102; STAT 231 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Cross-listed with STAT 344. (4)

ECON 345: Mathematical Topics in Economics - SO

An introduction to basic applications of mathematical tools used in economic analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111, ECON 102 or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 386: Evolution of Economic Thought

Economic thought from ancient to modern times; emphasis on the period from Adam Smith to J.M. Keynes; the classical economists, the socialists, the marginalists, the neoclassical economists, and the Keynesians. Prerequisitie: ECON 101 or 111, or consent of instructor. (4)

ECON 387: Special Topics in Economics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ECON 388: Special Topics in Economics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ECON 389: Special Topics in Economics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ECON 487: Special Topics in Economics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ECON 488: Special Topics in Economics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ECON 489: Special Topics in Economics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ECON 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. Prerequisites: ECON 301 or 302 and consent of the department. (1 to 4)

ECON 495: Internship

A research and writing project in connection with a student's approved off-campus activity. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111; ECON 301 or 302, sophomore standing, and consent of the department. (1 to 4)

ECON 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR

Seminar in economic problems and policies with emphasis on encouraging the student to integrate problem-solving methodology with tools of economic analysis. Topic(s) selected by class participants and instructor. Prerequisite: ECON 101, 102, 301 or 302, senior standing; satisfactory completion of two 300-level economics courses in addition to ECON 301 and 302, all with grade of a C- or above, and declared economics major; or consent of instructor. (4)

EDUC 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

EDUC 195: Survey of Education and Community Involvement

The class will review the various educational opportunities in community organizations including education provided by: museums; environmental interpretation groups; music organizations; theatres; film festivals; and science centers. The class will be taught using activities, lecture, guest speakers, reading and research, field experiences along with group and individual assignments and projects. (4)

EDUC 205: Multicultural Perspectives in the Classroom - A

Examination of issues of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, etc. as they relate to educational practices. (4)

EDUC 287: Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 288: Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 289: Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

EDUC 320: Issues in Child Abuse and Neglect

Issues of child abuse, neglect, harassment, and violence. Includes identification and reporting procedures, and the legal and professional responsibilities of all mandated reporters. (1)

EDUC 360: Tools for Community Involvement

Students preparing for outreach education in museums, environmental interpretive centers, outreach education, and other community involvement settings will explore needed tools including: administration, leadership, connecting and interpreting with experts, exhibit design, curriculum, funding, recruiting and training volunteers, and other skills used to bridge community educational with schools and other venues. (4)

EDUC 385: Comparative Education - C

Comparison and investigation of materials and cultural systems of education throughout the world. Emphasis on applying knowledge for greater understanding of diverse populations in the K-12 educational system. (4)

EDUC 387: Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 388: Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 389: Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 390: Inquiry into Learning I: Investigation into Learning and Development

Investigation into theories of learning and development and into historical and current practices, values, and beliefs that influence efforts to shape learning in educational settings. Topics include: self as learner, theories of learning, others as learners, exceptionalities, technology, values, literacy and factors influencing learning and literacy (fieldwork included). Concurrent with EDUC 392. (4)

EDUC 391: Foundations of Learning

Investigation into theories of learning and development and into historical and current practices, values, and beliefs that influence efforts to shape learning in educational settings. Topics include: self as learner, theories of learning, others as learners, exceptionalities, technology, values literacy and factors influencing learning and literacy. Limited to music education majors. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education and Kinesiology and completion of MUSI 340. (3)

EDUC 392: Inquiry into Learning II: Investigation into Learning and Development

Continued investigation into theories of learning and development and into historical and current practices, values, and beliefs that influence efforts to shape learning in educational settings. Topics include: self as learner, theories of learning, others as learners, exceptionalities, technology, values, literacy and factors influencing learning and literacy (fieldwork included). Concurrent with EDUC 390. (4)

EDUC 394: Technology and Teaching: Laboratory

Laboratory in which students explore instructional uses of technology and develop and apply various skills and competencies. Concurrent with EDUC 390. (2)

EDUC 406: Mathematics in K-8 Education

Exploration of mathematical instructional practices consistent with current NCTM and Washington State standards. Includes lesson and unit planning, assessment, curriculum and classroom practices. Focus on development and analysis of student conceptual understanding. Emphasis on creating mathematical learning communities within and outside of the classroom. For Term III elementary education students. Practicum included. Prerequisite: MATH 124. (4)

EDUC 408: Literacy in K-8 Education

Participation in the development of appropriate curricular strategies and instructional methods for supporting the diversity of learners' language/literacy growth. For elementary students. Practicum included, concurrent with EDUC 412 and EDUC 424. (4)

EDUC 410: Science/Health in K-8 Education

Strategies for teaching science by using inquiry methods and problem-solving techniques will be employed to explore interactive curricula from an environmental point of view. Issues of nutrition and health. Practicum included, concurrent with EDUC 406 and EDUC 425. (4)

EDUC 411: Strategies for Language/Literacy Development

Cross-listed with EDUC 511. (4)

EDUC 412: Social Studies in K-8 Education

Focus on drawing connections between the content of social studies curricula and the lived experiences of human lives. Practicum included. Concurrent with EDUC 408 and EDUC 424. (4)

EDUC 413: Language/Literacy Development: Assessment and Instruction

Cross-listed with EDUC 513. (4)

EDUC 414: Foundations in Early Childhood Education

This course introduces the concepts of how children ages birth through grade three grow, develop and learn; the role of the family in the education of young children; and the importance of providing developmentally age and culturally appropriate learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, emotional and physical development of all young children. The course covers the historical context and rationale for providing educational programs to this age group and includes the laws and policies that currently affect delivery of services. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed course: SPED 414. (4)

EDUC 415: Working with Families of Young Children

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to engage families and to promote and support a family’s involvement in their child’s educational experiences. Students will learn effective ways to work with families and adults from a variety of cultural/linguistic/socio-economic backgrounds and to partner with economically disadvantaged families and families of children with special needs to develop appropriate individualized learning plans. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed course: SPED 415. (3)

EDUC 416: Assessment in Early Childhood

In this course, students will learn the many purposes of assessment and become familiar with some of the assessment strategies and tools used most frequently for each purpose. (2)

EDUC 417: Early Childhood Curriculum, Instructional Strategies, and Progress Monitoring

Students will learn the knowledge and skills needed to design classroom environments, develop and use curricula, deliver instruction, and make modifications based on student performance in the areas of art, music, science, math, language, literature, physical development, and critical thinking. Technology will be integrated throughout the course. (4)

EDUC 419: Child Guidance and Positive Behavior Support

This course is designed to introduce students to theories and skills needed to promote the development of self-regulation, emotional, and social skills in young children and to effectively manage disruptive behaviors in early childhood classroom settings. The course includes strategies for understanding the reasons for challenging behavior, observing and documenting specific behaviors, designing and delivering developmentally appropriate intervention, and advocating for children. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed course: SPED 419. (3)

EDUC 420A: Health, Safety, and Nutrition

This course will cover basic practices for promoting the health, safety, and good nutrition of young children. Students will become familiar with the program requirements of publicly-funded early childhood programs in each of these areas. (1)

EDUC 424: Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse Learners

Focus on general principles of instructional design and delivery with special emphasis on reading and language, assessment, adaptation, and classroom management. For elementary and secondary students not majoring in music or physical education. For elementary students, concurrent with EDUC 408 and EDUC 412. (4)

EDUC 425: Inquiry into Teaching II: Diverse Learners

Extension and expansion of ideas introduced in EDUC 424. Continued emphasis on instructional design and delivery with a focus on reading and language, assessment, adaptation, and classroom management. For elementary and secondary students outside of music and physical education, concurrent with EDUC 406 and EDUC 410. (4)

EDUC 428: Children's Literature in the K-8 Curriculum

Crosslisted with EDUC 528. (2)

EDUC 429: Adolescent Literature in the Secondary Curriculum

Cross-listed with EDUC 529. (2)

EDUC 430: Student Teaching in K-8 Education - SR

Teaching in classrooms of local public schools under the direct supervision of School of Education and Kinesiology faculty and classroom teachers. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Education courses Terms I-III. Concurrent with EDUC 450. (10)

EDUC 431: Children's Writing

Current theory and practice in the teaching and learning of writing in K-12 classrooms. Cross-listed with EDUC 530. (2)

EDUC 434: Student Teaching - Elementary (Dual) - SR

Designed for persons who do dual student teaching. Ten weeks of teaching in classrooms of local public schools under the direct supervision of Department of Education faculty and classroom teachers. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Education courses Terms I-III. Concurrent with EDUC 450. (6)

EDUC 438: Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction (K-12)

Cross-listed with EDUC 538. (4)

EDUC 444: English in Secondary School

Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning, curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. (4)

EDUC 445: Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and English as a Second Language

Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning, curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. Required for foreign language endorsement. (4)

EDUC 446: Mathematics in the Secondary School

Methods and materials in secondary school math teaching. Basic mathematical concepts; principles of number operation, relation, proof, and problem solving in the context of arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed with EDUC 446. Prerequisite: MATH 253 or 331. (4)

EDUC 447: Science in Secondary School

Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning, curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. (4)

EDUC 448: Social Studies in the Secondary School

Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning, curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. (4)

EDUC 450: Inquiry into Learning and Teaching: Reflective Practice Seminar

A seminar for all education students (except music and physical education) focusing development of professionalism and competence in inquiry and reflective practice (elementary and secondary). Taken with student teaching Term IV Hub. (2)

EDUC 458: Student Teaching in Early Childhood Education

Teaching in early childhood settings serving children, ages birth to eight, with and without disabilities. Nine weeks. Candidates getting both the ECE/ECSE and special education endorsements will spend part of this time in a special education setting. Concurrent enrollment with EDUC 434 and 450. Cross-listed course: SPED 458. (3)

EDUC 466: Student Teaching - Secondary (Dual) - SR

Designed for students who do dual student teaching. Ten weeks of teaching in classrooms of local public schools under the direct supervision of School of Education faculty and classroom teachers (taken with SPED 439, 5 hours, and EDUC 450, 4 hours) (secondary students). (7)

EDUC 468: Student Teaching - Secondary - SR

Teaching in public schools under the direction of classroom and university teachers. Prerequisites: Formal application; senior standing; cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher. Concurrent with EDUC 450. (10)

EDUC 487: Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 488: ST: Higher Education Leadership

Explores the foundations of leadership. Focus is on leadership in higher education. Restricted to PLU administrations and faculty. (1 to 4)

EDUC 489: Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 490: Acquisition and Development of Language

Investigation of how young children acquire their first language and what they know as a result of this learning. Cross-listed with EDUC 510. (2)

EDUC 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

EDUC 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

EDUC 497: Special Project

Individual study and research on education problems or additional laboratory experience in public school classrooms. Prerequisite: Consent of the dean. (1 to 4)

ENGL 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

ENGL 213: Topics in Literature: Themes and Authors - LT

A variable-content course that focuses on the act of reading and interpreting texts. (4)

ENGL 214: Introduction to Major Literary Genres - LT

Introduction to one or more of the major literary genres (fiction, poetry or drama). Focus of course varies with instructor and term. May be taken more than once for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 216: Topics in Literature: Emphasis on Cross Cultural Perspectives - C, LT

A variable-content course that focuses on literature from non-Euro-American societies. Because course topics may vary considerably, course may be repeated for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 217: Topics in Literature: Emphasis on Alternative Persepctives - A, LT

A variable-content course that focuses on literature that fosters an awareness and understanding of diversity in the United States. Courses may be repeated for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 221: Research and Writing - WR

Strategies for writing academic research papers are practiced, including developing appropriate research topics, locating and using a variety of relevant sources, substantiating generalizations, and using paraphrase and citation accurately. (2 or 4)

ENGL 222: Travel Writing - WR

Writing about travel, while traveling or upon return. Students keep travel journals, produce short travel essays, and read selected travel writers. (4)

ENGL 225: Autobiographical Writing - WR

Reading autobiography and writing parts of one's own, with an emphasis on how writing style and personal identity complement each other. (4)

ENGL 227: Introduction to Poetry and Fiction - WR

A beginning workshop in writing poetry or short fiction. Includes a study of techniques and forms to develop critical standards and an understanding of the writing process. Prerequisite: WRIT 101 or its equivalent, Advanced Placement, or consent of instructor. (4)

ENGL 231: Masterpieces of European Literature - LT

Representative works of classical, medieval, and early Renaissance literature. Cross-listed with CLAS 231. (4)

ENGL 232: Women's Literature - A, LT

An introduction to fiction, poetry, and other literatures by women writers. Includes an exploration of women's ways of reading and writing. (4)

ENGL 233: Post-Colonial Literature - C, LT

Writers from Africa, India, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the Caribbean confront the legacy of colonialism from an insider's perspective. Emphasis on fiction. (4)

ENGL 234: Environmental Literature - LT

Examines representations of nature in literature, and the ways in which humans define themselves and their relationship with nature through those representations. Focuses on major texts from various cultures and historical periods. Includes poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. (4)

ENGL 235: Children's Literature - LT

An introduction to the critical reading of picture books, chapter books, novels, and nonfiction for young readers, addressing historical and cultural contexts. (4)

ENGL 241: American Traditions in Literature - LT

Selected themes that distinguish American literature from British traditions, from colonial or early national roots to current branches: for example, confronting the divine, inventing selfhood, coping with racism. (4)

ENGL 251: British Traditions in Literature - LT

Selected themes that define British literature as one of the great literatures of the world, from Anglo-Saxon origins to post-modern rebellions: for example, identity, society, and God; love and desire; industry, science, and culture. (4)

ENGL 287: Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 288: Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 289: Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

ENGL 300: English Studies Seminar

A variable-content seminar (theme selected by instructor) focusing on the imaginative, critical, and social power of reading and writing. Students will read and write in a variety of genres, engage criticism and theory, and reflect on the broad question of why reading and writing matter. Required for all English majors before taking senior seminar. Strongly recommended for sophomore year or fall semester of junior year. (4)

ENGL 301: Shakespeare - LT

Study of representative works of the great poet as a central figure in the canon of English literature. (4)

ENGL 311: The Book in Society

A critical study of the history of book culture and the role of books in modern society. Cross-listed with COMA 321. (4)

ENGL 312: Publishing Procedures

A workshop introduction to the world of book publishing, involving students in decisions about what to publish and how to produce it. Cross-listed with COMA 322. (4)

ENGL 313: The Art of the Book I

This studio course explores the history, aesthetics, and creative dimensions of book design and typography. Cross-listed with ARTD 315. Requires permission from the Printing and Publishing Arts director in the Department of English and instructor. (4)

ENGL 314: Art of the Book II

Individual projects to explore further typography and fine bookmaking. (4)

ENGL 322: Travel Writing

Writing about travel, while traveling or upon return. Students keep travel journals, produce short travel essays, and read selected travel writers. (4)

ENGL 323: Writing in Professional and Public Settings - WR

Students working in professional settings analyze the rhetorical demands of their job-related writing. (4)

ENGL 324: Free-Lance Writing - WR

A workshop in writing for publication, with primary emphasis on the feature article. (4)

ENGL 325: Personal Essay - WR

Students write essays on topics of their choice, working particularly on voice and style. (4)

ENGL 326: Writing for Children - WR

A workshop in writing fiction and non-fiction for children and teenagers, with an introduction to the varieties of contemporary children's literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 235, ENGL 227 or its equivalent, or consent of instructor. (4)

ENGL 327: Intermediate Poetry Writing - WR

An intermediate-level workshop that focuses on the analysis and writing of poems. Prerequisite: ENGL 227. (4)

ENGL 328: Theories of Reading and Writing - WR

Students are introduced to philosophical, social, and pragmatic issues confronting teachers of writing. Required for certification by the School of Education and Movement Studies. (4)

ENGL 329: Intermediate Fiction Writing WR

An intermediate-level workshop that focuses on the analysis and writing of fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 227. (4)

ENGL 334: Special Topics in Children's Literature - LT

Content varies each year. Possible topics include genres, themes, historical periods, and traditions. May be repeated for credit with different topic. (4)

ENGL 335: Fairy Tales and Fantasy - LT

Fairy tales are told and interpreted; interpretive models and theories from several psychological traditions are explored. Fantasy is looked at both as image and as story. (4)

ENGL 341: Feminist Approaches to Literature - A, LT

Introduction to a variety of feminisms in contemporary theory as frameworks for reading feminist literature and for approaching traditional literature from feminist positions. (4)

ENGL 342: American Ethnic Literatures - A, LT

Attention to literatures and popular traditions of America's ethnic communities. Includes African and Asian Americans, Native Americans and Latino/as. (4)

ENGL 343: Post Colonial Literature and Theory - C, LT

Introduces perspectives of post-colonial theorists as a framework for understanding the relationship of colonialism and its legacies to the works of writers from Africa, the Caribbean, and other ex-colonial territories. (4)

ENGL 345: Special Topics in Literature and Difference - A or C, LT

A variable-content course, focusing on specific authors, themes, genres, or historical periods in literatures in English written by marginalized or under-represented groups. May be repeated for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 351: English Medieval Literature - LT

A survey of the first two periods of English literature: Old English, including the epic Beowulf, and Middle English, ranging from the romance Sir Gawain and the Green Knight to the beginnings of English drama in Everyman. (4)

ENGL 353: Renaissance Literature - LT

Studies the Golden Age of English literature. Selected poets from Wyatt to Marvell, including Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Jonson; selected playwrights from Kyd to Webster; selected prose from More to Bacon and Browne. (4)

ENGL 355: Special Topics in Literature Before 1660 - LT

A variable-content course, focusing on specific authors, themes, genres, or historical periods in literature written before 1660. May be repeated for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 361: British Literature 1660-1800 - LT

Surveys the lively drama, neoclassical poetry, gothic fiction, and early novel of a period marked by religious controversy and philosophical optimism. (4)

ENGL 362: British Literature 1800-1914 - LT

A survey of the richly varied writers of 19th-century England seen in the context of a rapidly changing social reality-from romantic revolutionaries and dreamers to earnest cultural critics and myth-makers. (4)

ENGL 363: British Literature, 1914-1945 - LT

A survey of major developments in British literatures from 1914 to 1945. Includes focus on modernism and literatures of the two world wars. (4)

ENGL 364: British Literature, 1945 to the Present - LT

A survey of major developments in British literatures from 1945 to the present. Includes focus on postmodernism and post colonialism. (4)

ENGL 365: Special Topics in Literature Before 1914 - LT

A variable-content course, focusing on specific authors, themes, genres, or historical periods in Anglophone literatures written between 1608 and 1914. May be repeated for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 371: American Literature Before 1860 - LT

A survey of major developments in American literature, from the initial contact between European colonists and Native Americans, to the American Civil War. Focus includes colonial literature, early federal period, romaticism and transcendentalism, and literature of the sectional crisis over slavery. (4)

ENGL 372: American Literature, 1860-1914 - LT

A survey of major developments in American Literature between the end of the Civil War and the outbreak of World War I. Focus includes major movements, such as realism and naturalism. (4)

ENGL 373: American Literature, 1914-1945 - LT

A survey of major developments in American literature between 1914 and 1945. Focus includes modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, and literatures of the two world wars and the Great Depression. (4)

ENGL 374: American Literature, 1945 to Present - LT

A survey of major developments in American literature between 1945 to present. Includes focus on postmodernism, and major authors and forms both conventional and experimental. (4)

ENGL 375: Special Topics in Literature, 1914 to Present - LT

A variable-content course, focusing on specific authors, themes, genres, or historical periods in Anglophone literatures written since 1914. May be repeated for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 385: Special Topics in Creative Nonfiction -WR

An open-topic course focusing on a specific subgenre of or topic in nonfiction prose writing. Possible topics might include the lyric essay, memoir, biography, environmental writing, social justice writing, etc. May be repeated for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 387: Topics in Rhetoric, Writing and Culture

Provides writers with a grounding in Rhetoric, the art of shaping discourse to respond to cultural context and to produce cultural and social effects. Strategies for generating discourse, appealing to audiences, and crafting a style will be studied in light of their historical origins, theoretical assumptions, social and ethical implications, and practical utility. Recommended for writing majors. (4)

ENGL 388: Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 389: Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 393: The English Language

Studies in the structure and history of English, with emphasis on syntactical analysis and issues of usage. (4)

ENGL 399: Critical Theory - LT, WR

Issues in literary studies and in rhetorical theory are discussed in relationship to influential movements such as reader-response, cultural studies, feminism, and deconstruction. Recommended for prospective graduate students. (4)

ENGL 421: Tutorial in Writing - WR

Guided work in an individual writing project. A plan of study must be approved before the student may register for the course. (1 to 4)

ENGL 425: Seminar: Nonfiction Writing - SR, WR

An advanced-level workshop in the writing of nonfiction prose. Focus (on genre or theme) varies with instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 300 and one upper-division course from lines 1, 3 or 4 of writing emphasis, or instructor permission. (4)

ENGL 427: Seminar: Poetry Writing - SR, WR

An advanced-level workshop that focuses on the analysis and writing of poems. Prerequisites: ENGL 300 and 327, or instructor permission. (4)

ENGL 429: Seminar: Fiction Writing - SR, WR

An advanced-level workshop that focuses on the analysis and writing of fiction. Prerequisites: ENGL 300 and 329, or instructor permission. (4)

ENGL 451: Seminar: Major Authors - LT, SR

Concentrated study of the work, life, influence, and critical reputation of a major author in the English-speaking world. The course includes careful attention to the relations of the author to cultural contexts, the framing of critical approaches through literary theory, substantial library research, and a major writing project. (4)

ENGL 452: Seminar: Theme, Genre - LT, SR

Concentrated study of a major literary theme or genre, as it might appear in various periods, authors, and cultures. The course includes careful attention to practical criticism, the framing of critical approaches through literary theory, substantial library research, and a major writing project. (4)

ENGL 487: Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 488: Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 489: Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 491: Independent Study

An intensive course in reading. May include a thesis. Intended for majors only. (4)

ENGL 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

ENVT 104: Conservation of Natural Resources - NS, SM

Principles and problems of public and private stewardship of our resources with specific reference to the Pacific Northwest. Cross-listed with GEOS 104. (4)

ENVT 239: Environment and Culture

Study of the ways in which environmental issues are shaped by human culture and values. Major conceptions of nature, including non-western perspectives and issues in eco-justice. Critical evaluations of literature, arts, ethics, conceptual frameworks, history, and spirituality. Cross-listed with RELI 239. (4)

ENVT 287: Special Topics in Environmental Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENVT 288: Special Topics in Environmental Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENVT 289: Special Topics in Environmental Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENVT 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

ENVT 350: Environmental Methods

Study of a watershed using and integrating techniques and principles of environmental sciences, political science, economics, and ethics. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: Line One completed or consent of instructor. (4)

ENVT 387: Special Topics in Environmental Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENVT 388: Special Topics in Environmental Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENVT 389: Special Topics in Environmental Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENVT 487: Special Topics in Environmental Studies

Selected topics as announced by the program. Course will address current interdisciplinary issues in environmental studies. (1 to 4)

ENVT 488: Special Topics in Environmental Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENVT 489: Special Topics in Environmental Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENVT 491: Independent Study

Opportunity to focus on specific topics or issues in environmental studies under the supervision of a faculty member. (1 to 4)

ENVT 495: Internship in ENVT

An internship with a private or public sector agency, organization, or company involved in environmental issues. By consent of the chair of Environmental Studies only. (4)

ENVT 498: Interdisciplinary Inquiry and Analysis

Guides students in analyses and inquiry of environmental issues, integrating and drawing upon methodology and content of various disciplinary perspectives. Encourages reflection on experiential learning and vocation. Includes field trips or active learning. Culminates in a proposal for the capstone senior project. Prerequisites: ENVT 350, completion of a pre-approved experiential learning activity and permission of instructor. (4)

ENVT 499: Capstone: Senior Project - SR

An interdisciplinary research project of the student's design that integrates the methods and contents of various academic perspectives to develop approaches to complex environmental challenges. A written and oral presentation is required. Prerequisite: ENVT 350. (4)

EPSY 361: Psychology for Teaching

Principles and research in human development and learning, especially related to teaching and to the psychological growth, relationships, and adjustment of individuals. For Music Education majors only. Admission to the School of Education and Kinesiology and completion of MUSI 340. (3)

EPSY 368: Educational Psychology

Principles and research in human learning and their implications for curriculum and instruction. For secondary students who are not seeking certification in physical education or special education. Taken concurrently with EDUC 424. (4)

FREN 101: Elementary French

Essentials of pronunciation, intonation, and structure; basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. (4)

FREN 102: Elementary French

Essentials of pronunciation, intonation, and structure; basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: FREN 101, French placement exam or instructor permission. (4)

FREN 201: Intermediate French - C

Review of basic grammar, development of vocabulary and emphasis on spontaneous, oral expression. Reading selections which reflect the cultural heritage and society of the Francophone world. Prerequisite: FREN 102.(4)

FREN 202: Intermediate French - C

Review of basic grammar, development of vocabulary and emphasis on spontaneous, oral expression. Reading selections which reflect the cultural heritage and society of the Francophone world. Prerequisite: FREN 201. (4)

FREN 241: French Language/Caribbean Culture in Martinique - C

French language study; lectures on history, geography, and literature of the French West Indies by local experts; a home stay; cultural excursions; and a final project. Credit toward French minor; credit toward major with the prior permission of both the instructor and the student's advisor. Prerequisite: FREN 201 or permission of instructor. (4)

FREN 287: Special Topics in French

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

FREN 288: Special Topics in French

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

FREN 289: Special Topics in French

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

FREN 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

FREN 301: Advanced French - C

Advanced grammar, composition, and conversation with an introduction to French literature and film. Prerequisite: FREN 202. (4)

FREN 302: Advanced French - C

Advanced grammar, composition, and conversation with an introduction to French literature and film. Prerequisite: FREN 202. (4)

FREN 310: Special Topics in French History/Culture - C

Perspectives on French and Francophone culture, history, and society. May focus on an individual, era, or episode (e.g., Louis XIV; the French Revolution; the Dreyfus Affair); traditional or innovative practices (e.g., French agriculture and cuisine; the media); or an enduring question (e.g., artist's relation to society). Prerequisite: FREN 301, 302, or permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. (4)

FREN 387: Special Topics in French

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

FREN 388: Special Topics in French

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

FREN 389: Special Topics in French

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

FREN 401: Early Modern French Literature - C, LT

French literature from the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Grand Siècle, and/or the Enlightenment, with intensive study of a theme or genre of enduring interest. Prerequisite: FREN 301 or permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. (4)

FREN 402: Modern French Literature - C, LT

French literature from the long nineteenth century, including Hugo, Sand, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, and/or Zola, with attention to romanticism, realism, naturalism, and symbolism; includes study of the French novel and an introduction to French poetry. Prerequisites: FREN 301 or permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. (4)

FREN 403: Contemporary French Literature - C, LT

French literature since World War I, including Gide, Proust, Sartre, and/or Beauvoir with attention to the development of ideas of modernity and postmodernity; includes an introduction to modern French theatr. Prerequisites: FREN 301 or permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. (4)

FREN 404: (Post) Colonial Francophone Literature - C, LT

Issues of identity and justice in French language literature/film from North Africa, West Africa, North America, and/or the Caribbean, with attention to historical context and aesthetic innovation. Prerequisites: FREN 301 or permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. (4)

FREN 487: Special Topics in French

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

FREN 488: Special Topics in French

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

FREN 489: Special Topics in French

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

FREN 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

FREN 499: Capstone: Senior Project - SR

To enable senior students in an academic unit to share their work and receive group criticism. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Capstone and may be followed by a specific title designated by the academic unit. (4)

GEOS 102: General Oceanography - NS, SM

Oceanography and its relationship to other fields; physical, chemical, biological, climatic, and geological aspects of the sea. Includes labs and field trips. (4)

GEOS 103: Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Geologic Hazards - NS, SM

Study of the geologic environment and its relationship to humans, with emphasis on geologic features and processes that create hazards when encroached upon by human activity, including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides and avalanches, and solutions to problems created by these hazards. Includes labs and field trips. (4)

GEOS 104: Conservation of Natural Resources - NS, SM

Principles and problems of public and private stewardship of our resources with special reference to the Pacific Northwest. Includes labs and field trips. Cross-listed with ENVT 104. (4)

GEOS 105: Meteorology - NS, SM

A full, balanced, and up-to-date coverage of the basic principles of meteorology. Examination of the impacts of severe weather on humans and the environment. Includes labs. (4)

GEOS 106: Geology of National Parks - NS

Study of the significant geologic features, processes, and history as illustrated by selected National Parks. Relationship between human history and geology and the impact of geology on our lives will be included. (4)

GEOS 107: Global Climate Changes - NS

A survey of current climate change research. Students will develop and apply a fundamental understanding of earth systems through evaluation of geologic and other scientific evidence for long- and short-term climate change. (4)

GEOS 109: The Geology of Energy - NS, SM

Geoscientific exploration of natural systems and processes that create non-renewable and renewable energy resources. Issues of extraction and exploitation of diverse energy resources in a global context. May not be repeated for credit. (4)

GEOS 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

GEOS 201: Geologic Principles - NS, SM

A survey of geologic processes as they apply to the evolution of the North American continent, including the interaction of humans, with their geologic environment. Students participate actively in classes that integrate laboratory and field study of rocks, minerals, fossils, maps and environmental aspects of geology and emphasize development basic skills of geologic inquiry. This course meets state education certification requirements for content in physical and historical geology. Includes labs and field trips. (4)

GEOS 287: Special Topics in Geosciences

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GEOS 288: Special Topics in Geosciences

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GEOS 289: Special Topics in Geosciences

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GEOS 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

GEOS 324: Igneous Petrology

Applied and theoretical study of the genesis, nature, and distribution of igneous rocks, at microscopic to global scales. Includes labs. Prerequisites: GEOS 201, 326, or consent of instructor. (2)

GEOS 325: Structural Geology

The form and spatial relationships of various rock masses and an introduction to rock deformation; consideration of basic processes to understand mountain building and continental formation; laboratory emphasizes practical techniques which enable students to analyze regional structural patterns. Includes labs. Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. (4)

GEOS 326: Optical Mineralogy

Theory and practice of mineral studies using the petrographic microscope, including immersion oil techniques, production of thin sections, and determination of minerals by means of their optical properties. Includes labs. Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. (2)

GEOS 327: Stratigraphy and Sedimentation

Formational principles of surface-accumulated rocks, and their incorporation in the stratigraphic record. This subject is basic to field mapping and structural interpretation. Includes labs. Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. (4)

GEOS 328: Paleontology - NS, SM

A systematic study of the fossil record, combining principles of evolutionary development, paleohabitats and preservation, with practical experience of specimen identification. Includes labs. Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. (4)

GEOS 329: Metamorphic Petrology

Consideration of the mineralogical and textural changes that rocks undergo during orogenic episodes, including physical-chemical parameters of the environment as deduced from experimental studies. Includes labs. Prerequisites: GEOS 201, 326 or consent of instructor. (2)

GEOS 331: Maps: Computer-Aided Mapping and Analysis

Computer-based Geographic Information Systems, digital maps, and data sources. The creation, interpretation, and analysis of digital maps from multiple data sources. Analysis of spatial information from sciences, social sciences, and humanities using sets of digital maps. Includes labs. Prerequisite: Previous science (geosciences preferred), math or computer science course or consent of instructor. Familiarity with maps recommended. (4)

GEOS 332: Geomorphology

Study of the processes that shape the Earth's surface with emphasis on the effects of rock type, geologic structure, and climate on the formation and evolution of landforms. Includes labs. Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. (4)

GEOS 334: Hydrogeology

Study of the hydrologic cycle, investigating surface and groundwater flow, resource evaluation and development, wells, water quality and geothermal resources. Emphasis on water problems in the Puget Sound area, with additional examples from diverse geologic environments. Includes labs. Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. (4)

GEOS 335: Geophysics

Study of the physical nature of the earth, its properties and processes, employing techniques from seismology, heat flow, gravity, magnetism, and electrical conductivity. Emphasis on understanding the earth's formation, structure, and plate tectonics processes as well as geophysical exploration techniques. Includes labs. Prerequisites: GEOS 201, one semester of calculus, physics (high-school-level or above), or consent of instructor. (4)

GEOS 340: Glacial Geology

Applied and theoretical study of glacier dynamics, glacial geomorphology, and ice ages. Includes the role of glaciers in water resources, earth history, and climate change. Examines ice on microscopic to continental scales. Examines glacial change on short- and long-term timescales. Local glaciated environments will be featured. Includes labs. Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. (4)

GEOS 350: Marine Geology

Study of the 70% of the earth beneath the oceans, focusing on the extensive discoveries of the past few decades. Emphasis on marine sediments, sedimentary processes, plate tectonic processes, and the historical geology of the oceans. Includes labs. Prerequisite: GEOS 102 or 201, or consent of instructor. (4)

GEOS 387: Special Topics in Geosciences

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GEOS 388: Special Topics in Geosciences

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GEOS 389: Special Topics in Geosciences

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GEOS 390: Field Trip

Field and on-campus study of major geologic sites in western U.S. Trips take place during spring break or at end of spring semester. Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. A minimum of 4 credits of 300-level geosciences courses. Pass/Fail. (1)

GEOS 487: Special Topics in Geosciences

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GEOS 488: Special Topics in Geosciences

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GEOS 489: Special Topics in Geosciences

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GEOS 491: Independent Study

Investigations or research in areas of special interest not covered by regular courses. Requires regular supervision by a faculty member. (1 to 4)

GEOS 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

GEOS 498: Seminar

Discussion of professional papers and introduction to directed research for the Capstone project. Required of all majors in their senior year. December graduates should complete the sequence (GEOS 498-499) in their final full year. Prerequisite: At least 8 semester hours of 300-level or above courses in Geosciences. Pass/Fail. (1)

GEOS 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR

Culminating experience applying geological methods and theory through original literature or field or laboratory research under the guidance of a faculty mentor, with written and oral presentation of results. Required of all majors in their senior year. Prerequisite: GEOS 498. (2)

GERM 101: Elementary German I

Basic skills of oral and written communication in classroom and laboratory practice. Use of materials reflecting contemporary German life. (4)

GERM 102: Elementary German II

Basic skills of oral and written communication in classroom and laboratory practice. Use of materials reflecting contemporary German life. Prerequisite: GERM 101 or equivalent. (4)

GERM 190: FYEP190: First Year Inquiry

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

GERM 201: Intermediate German I - C

Continued practice in oral and written communication in classroom and laboratory. Use of materials which reflect contemporary life as well as the German cultural heritage. (4)

GERM 202: Intermediate German II - C

Continued practice in oral and written communication in classroom and laboratory. Use of materials which reflect contemporary life as well as the German cultural heritage. Prerequisite: GERM 201 or equivalent. (4)

GERM 231: Language, Art and Culture in the New Germany - C

This interdisciplinary course based in Cologne, Germany, combines German language instruction and an authentic home stay experience with language immersion and close cultural study of the three main German-speaking countries, Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. (4)

GERM 287: Special Topics in German

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GERM 288: Special Topics in German

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GERM 289: Special Topics in German

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GERM 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

GERM 301: Composition and Conversation I - C

Intensive review of grammar with emphasis on idiomatic usage; use of contemporary authors as models of style. Conversation on topics of student interest. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent. (4)

GERM 302: Composition and Conversation II - C

Intensive review of grammar with emphasis on idiomatic usage; use of contemporary authors as models of style. Conversation on topics of student interest. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent. (4).

GERM 321: German Cultural History to 1750 - C

From the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment. An exploration of German cultural history through the study of art, music and literature. Prerequisite: GERM 302. (4)

GERM 322: German Cultural History Since 1750 - C

From the Enlightenment to the present. This course explores representative works and trends in German politics, philosophy, literature, art and music. Prerequisite: GERM 302. (4)

GERM 331: Language, Art and Culture in the New Germany - C

This interdisciplinary course based in Cologne, Germany, combines German language instruction and an authentic home stay experience with language immersion and close cultural study of the three main German-speaking countries, Germany, Austria and Switzerland. (4)

GERM 387: Special Topics in German

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GERM 388: Special Topics in German

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GERM 389: Special Topics in German

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GERM 423: Topics in German Literature and Culture I - C, LT

An opportunity to pursue an in-depth study of a specific aspect or topic in German-language literature and culture. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: GERM 302. (4)

GERM 424: Topics in German Literature and Culture II - C, LT

An opportunity to pursue an in-depth study of a specific aspect or topic in German-language literature and culture. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: GERM 302.

GERM 487: Special Topics in German

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GERM 488: Special Topics in German

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GERM 489: Special Topics in German

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GERM 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

GERM 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

GERM 499: Capstone: Senior Project - SR

To enable senior students in an academic unit to share their work and receive group criticism. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Capstone and may be followed by a specific title designated by the academic unit. (4)

GLST 287: Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 288: Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 289: Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

GLST 387: Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 388: Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 389: Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 487: Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 488: Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 489: Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

GLST 495: Internship

A project, usually undertaken during a study-abroad experience and supervised by a PLU faculty member, that combines field experience, research, and writing on issues related to the student's issue concentration in Global Studies. Local internships that involve transnational issues and constituencies will also be considered. Prerequisite: Prior consent of the chair of the Global Studies Committee and of the supervising PLU faculty member. (1 to 12)

GLST 499: Capstone: Research Seminar - SR

Required of all students majoring and minoring in Global Studies, this is a capstone seminar that culminates in the writing of an extensive research paper. Prerequisite: ANTH/HIST/POLS 210. (4)

GREK 101: Elementary Greek

Basic skills in reading classical, koine, and patristic Greek. (4)

GREK 102: Elementary Greek

Basic skills in reading classical, koine, and patristic Greek. Prerequisite: GREK 101 or instructor permission. (4)

GREK 211: Intermediate Readings in Greek Prose - C

Readings in selected Classical, Hellenistic, or Koine prose. May be retaken as GREK 311 when different material is offered. Prerequisite: GREK 111/112 or instructor permission. (4)

GREK 212: Intermediate Readings in Greek Poetry - C

Readings in selected Classical, Hellenistic, or Koine poetry. May be retaken as GREK 312 when different material is offered. Prerequisite: GREK 102 or instructor permission. (4)

GREK 287: Special Topics in Greek

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GREK 288: Special Topics in Greek

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GREK 289: Special Topics in Greek

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GREK 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

GREK 311: Intermediate Readings in Greek Prose - C

Readings in selected Classical, Hellenistic, or Koine prose. Prerequisite: Instructor permission is required. (4)

GREK 312: Intermediate Readings in Greek Poetry - C

Readings in selected Classical, Hellenistic, or Koine poetry. Prerequisite: Instructor permission is required. (4)

GREK 387: Special Topics in Greek

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GREK 388: Special Topics in Greek

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GREK 389: Special Topics in Greek

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GREK 487: Special Topics in Greek

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GREK 488: Special Topics in Greek

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GREK 489: Special Topics in Greek

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GREK 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

GREK 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

HISP 101: Elementary Spanish

Essentials of pronunciation, intonation, and structure; basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Lab attendance required. Students with more than two years of high school Spanish must enroll in HISP 102. (4, 4)

HISP 102: Elementary Spanish

Essentials of pronunciation, intonation, and structure; basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Lab attendance required. Students with more than two years of high school Spanish must enroll in HISP 102. (4, 4)

HISP 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

HISP 201: Intermediate Spanish - C

A continuation of elementary Spanish; reading selections which reflect the Spanish cultural heritage as well as contemporary materials. Lab attendance required. (4, 4)

HISP 202: Intermediate Spanish C

A continuation of elementary Spanish; reading selections which reflect the Spanish cultural heritage as well as contemporary materials. Lab attendance required. (4, 4)

HISP 231: Intensive Spanish in Latin America - C

An intensive Spanish course offered in a Latin American country and geared to students at the intermediate (equivalent to HISP 201 or 202) and advanced (equivalent to 301) language level. Course includes four and one-half hours of class per day for a four-week period, a home stay, a service project, excursions, and guest lectures on a variety of topics related to the history and culture of the host country. Placment at the HISP 231 or 331 levels is determined by the student's background and experience in Spanish. Prerequisite: HISP 102. (4)

HISP 287: Special Topics in Hispanic Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HISP 288: Special Topics in Hispanic Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HISP 289: Special Topics in Hispanic Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HISP 301: Hispanic Voices for Social Change - C

HISP 301 is a content-based intensive reading and writing course that offers an examination of diverse texts from different times and places in Spanish speaking countries, to focus on how people establish different yet coherent strategies of resistance and adaptation which in turn respond to experiences of social injustice, inequality, geographical displacement and human rights violations in their respective communities. Prerequisite: HISP 202. (4)

HISP 321: Civilization & Culture of Spain - C

Development of Spanish society from early times to the present as reflected in architecture, painting, and literature, within their socio-historical context. Prerequisite: HISP 301 (or concurrent enrollment). (4)

HISP 322: Latin American Civilization & Culture - C

Historic, artistic, literary, sociological, and geographic elements shaping the development of the Latin American region. Prerequisite: HISP 301 (or concurrent enrollment). (4)

HISP 325: Introduction to Hispanic Literary Studies - C, LT

Acquaints students with techniques of literary analysis, as applied to examples of narrative, poetry, drama, and essay in the Spanish and Latin American literary traditions. Reading, writing, and speaking-intensive. Ongoing review of advanced grammar. Prerequisite: HISP 301. (4)

HISP 331: Intensive Spanish in Latin America - C

An intensive Spanish course offered in a Latin American country and geared to students at the intermediate (equivalent to HISP 201 or 202) and advanced (equivalent to 301) language level. Course includes four and one-half hours of class per day for a four-week period, a home stay, a service project, excursions, and guest lectures on a variety of topics related to the history and culture of the host country. Placement at the HISP 231 or 331 levels is determined by the student's background and experience in Spanish. Prerequisite: HISP 102. (4)

HISP 341: The Latino Experiences in the U.S. - A, LT

Exploration of the histories, experiences, and contributions of the Latino peoples in the United States as they appear in Latino literature and film. Course content is enriched through related service learning experience. Readings are in English. May count toward major, but not toward minor in Hispanic Studies. (4)

HISP 387: Special Topics in Hispanic Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HISP 388: Special Topics in Hispanic Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HISP 389: Special Topics in Hispanic Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HISP 401: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics - C

HISP 401 is an advanced-level content-based course with an in-depth analysis of Spanish syntax, phonology, and morphology along with the evolution of the Spanish language, including the study of dialects and the history of indigenous languages. Prerequisite: HISP 301. (4)

HISP 421: Masterpieces of Spanish Literature - C, LT

A concentrated study of major writers and movements in Hispanic literature from its origins to 1898. Prerequisite: HISP 325. (4)

HISP 422: 20th-Century Literature of Spain - C, LT

Drama, novel, essay, and poetry of Spain from the “Generation of 1898” to the present. Prerequisite: HISP 325. (4)

HISP 423: Special Topics in Spanish Literature & Culture - C, LT

An opportunity to pursue an in-depth study of a specific aspect or topic in Spanish literature, such as Spanish women writers or the relationship of film to other types of cultural production. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: HISP 325. (4)

HISP 431: Latin American Literature 1492 to 1888 - C, LT

A study of representative genres from the colonial period to the end of the 19th century. Prerequisite: HISP 325. (4)

HISP 432: 20th-Century Latin American Literature - C, LT

Development of the literature of Mexico, Central and South America from the Modernista movement (1888) to the present. Prerequisite: HISP 325. (4)

HISP 433: Special Topics in Latin American Literature & Culture - C, LT

An opportunity to pursue an in-depth study of a specific aspect or topic in Latin American literature and culture, such as Latin American women writers, Latino narrative, or Latin American film and literature. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: HISP 325. (4)

HISP 441: U.S. Latino Literature - A, LT

Course introduces students to critical concepts in the field of Latino/a literature. Through an examination of narrative texts from different times and places, we will focus on how U.S. Latino/a writers reinscribe native roots, cultures and languages in order to respond to the uncertainties of geographical displacement. For Hispanic Studies majors, and English majors with prior approval from the chair of the English Department. (4)

HISP 487: Special Topics in Hispanic Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HISP 488: Special Topics in Hispanic Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HISP 489: Special Topics in Hispanic Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HISP 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

HISP 499: Capstone: Senior Project - SR

To enable senior students in an academic unit to share their work and receive group criticism. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Capstone and may be followed by a specific title designated by the academic unit. (4)

HIST 107: Western Civilizations - SO

Surveys the history of western civilizations from ancient Mesopotamia to medieval Europe. Major themes include empire building, religion, law, art, and literature. Students learn to investiage historical problems, use sources, and write historical essays. Civilizations include ancient Sumer, Egypt, Israel, Persia, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Islamic civilization, and early medieval Europe. (4)

HIST 108: Western Civilizations - SO

Analysis of institutions and ideas of selected civilizations. Europe from the Renaissance to the present. (4)

HIST 109: East Asian Societies - C, SO

The broad sweep of East Asian history is examined with foci on the founding Chinese dynasty, unification wars in Korea, and the rape of Nanking in 1937. Throughout, students will confront scholarly fertile and politically tendentious topics which are analyzed via short essays, examinations, maps quizzes, original research, and role-playing exercises. (4)

HIST 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar - SO

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

HIST 210: Global Perspectives: The World in Change - C, SO

A survey of global issues: modernization and development; economic change and international trade; diminishing resources; war and revolution; peace and justice; and cultural diversity. (Although this course is cross-listed with ANTH and POLS 210, students receive history credit only when this course has a faculty member from history.) (4)

HIST 215: Modern World History - C, SO

Surveys major features of the principal existing civilizations of the world since 1450: East Asia, India and southern Asia, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Western civilization, sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America. (4)

HIST 220: Modern Latin American History - C, SO

Introduction to modern Latin American history, from 1810 to the present. (4)

HIST 227: The Vikings - SO

This course examines Old Norse culture and history during the Viking period (approximately 750-1100), focusing on Viking expansion and interactions with external European, Asian and American societies, conversion to Christianity and the emergence of medieval kingdoms, and on how our historical understanding of the Vikings is produced. Cross-listed with HIST/SCAN 227. (4)

HIST 231: World War Two in China and Japan, 1931-1945 - C, SO

This course unfolds multiple themes surrounding the East Asian experience of World War II, including mobilization, the establishment of collaboration governments, and the military impacts of Japanese occupation. Students will engage with memoirs, films, scholarly works, website memorials, and contemporary literature. (4)

HIST 232: Tibet in Fact and Fiction - C, SO

The history of Tibet, emphasizing Tibet's relationship with China and the West. How have outsiders imagined Tibet, and how have stereotypes affected international relationships? Students will explore the present crisis stemming from China's occupation of Tibet, and also confront the powers of myth, the emergence of China as a world power, and the agonies of globalization. (4)

HIST 233: Modern Korea - C

The course surveys the contemporary history of the Korean peninsula, analyzing the end of the tributary system and the period of Japanese colonial rule. After significant discussion of the central trauma of the Korean War, the course delves into the contemporary North Korean state, including the DPRK's relations with the United States, China, and its own refugee-citizens. (4)

HIST 245: American Business and Economic History, 1607-1877 - SO

Surveys the history of the American economy from pre-Columbian Indian societies through the English mercantilist system, the American Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the Civil War to the end of Reconstruction. Investigates influence of non-economic factors such as warfare, slavery, and the social standing of women on economic trends. (4)

HIST 247: American Business and Economic History, 1877-Present - SO

Surveys the history of American business and the economy from the rise of big business and labor unions after the American Civil War through the era of globalization. Topics include technological change, government regulation, business organization, economic thought, business ethics, the role of the entrepreneur, and the place of women and minorities in American business society. (4)

HIST 251: Colonial American History - SO

The history of what became the United States, from the settlement of America to the election of Thomas Jefferson as the third President of the United States in 1800. It will pay particular attention to three periods - the years of settlement, the era of adjustment to an imperial system around the turn of the 18th century, and the revolt against that system in the second half of the 18th century, which culminated in the creation of the American union. Emphasizes certain themes: the origins of racism and slavery, the course of the religious impulse in an increasingly secularized society, and finally, the ideological and constitutional transition from royal government and the rights of Englishmen to republicanism, and popular sovereignty. (4)

HIST 252: 19th Century U.S. History - SO

Political, economic, and social transformations in the U.S. during the nineteenth century. Two main themes: struggles over expansion of the American nation-state and over expansion and contraction of the national community. The Civil War is explored as pivotal, but the limitations of its effect are also examined. (4)

HIST 253: 20th-Century U.S. History - SO

Trends and events in domestic and foreign affairs since 1900; affluence, urban growth, and social contrasts. (4)

HIST 260: Early Modern European History, 1400-1700 - SO

The foundations of early modern Europe, an era associated with Renaissance and Reformation movements, technological innovation, economic expansion, the revival of learning and visual culture, and the exploration of new geographic worlds. Particular attention to artistic innovation, Protestant and Catholic renewal movements, and the exploration and colonization of the New World. (4)

HIST 287: Special Topics in History

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HIST 288: Special Topics in History - SO

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HIST 289: Special Topics in History - SO

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HIST 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

HIST 301: Introduction to Historical Methods and Research

Focus on historical methodology, research techniques, and the writing of history from a wide range of historical primary sources. Required for all history majors before taking the senior seminar. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 305: Slavery in the Americas - A

The comparative history of how slavery (and freedom) were constituted over time and in different parts of the Americas. Topics covered include: Atlantic slave trade, Native slavery, development of slavery and racism, rise of antislavery thought, plantation society, slave resistance and revolts, and the reconstruction of society after emancipation. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 310: Comtemporary Japan: 1945-Present

The course investigates the complexities of Japan as a defeated state under the shadow of American military and cultural power. The course analyzes cultural artifacts as well as the complex politics of national and international security. Issues of war memory, returnees from wartime China, and Japan's attempts to reconcile with regional neighbors represent key themes in this course. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 321: Greek Civilization

The political, social, and cultural history of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. Special attention to the literature, art, and intellectual history of the Greeks. Cross-listed with CLAS 321. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 322: Roman Civilization

The history of Rome from the foundation of the city to CE 337, the death of Constantine. Emphasis on Rome's expansion over the Mediterranean and on its constitutional history. Attention to the rise of Christianity within a Greco-Roman context. Cross-listed with CLAS 322. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 323: The Middle Ages

Surveys the history of Western Europe during the Middle Ages, from late antiquity (c. 200) to the High Middle Ages (c. 1300). Major themes include the late Roman Empire, early Christianity and monasticism, Germanic and Anglo-Saxon culture, Carolingian Europe, the First Crusade, trade networks and economic revival, and medieval Judaism. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 324: The Italian Renaissance

Political, cultural, and religious developments in Renaissance Italy from the formation of the Italian communes (c. 1200) to the death of Michelangelo (1564). Central themes include the development of merchant societies, Dante’s Divine Comedy, Humanism, the Italian Wars, and the painting of Giotto, Masaccio, Botticelli, and Leonardo da Vinci. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 325: European Reformations

Examines Protestant and Roman Catholic reform movements in sixteenth-century Europe as part of an overall process that redefined the role of religion in society and prepared Europe in decisive ways for the modern era. Themes include late-medieval religion and church/state tensions, and the reforms of Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, and Loyola. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 326: A History of Medicine: Antiquity to European Renaissance

An investigation of medical history from antiquity to the European Renaissance (c. 1660) through an examination of Greco-Roman, Islamic, Byzantine, and European traditions and their attendant concepts of health, healing, and disease. Crosslisted with CLAS 326. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 329: Europe and the World Wars: 1914-1945

World War I; revolution and return to "normalcy"? depression and the rise of fascism; World War II. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 332: Tudor England

Political, social, and religious developments in early modern England during the Tudor monarchies (1485-1603). Themes include the economic and demographic changes in England, Scotland, and Wales; Henry VIII’s “Great Matter”; the Protestant Reformation and Anglicanism; Thomas More’s Utopia; wars with France and Spain; and film study. Typically offered in J-Term. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 334: Modern Germany, 1848-1945

The Revolutions of 1848 and unification of Germany; Bismarckian and Wilhemian empires; Weimar Republic and the rise of National Socialism; the Third Reich. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 335: History of the Caribbean - C

Survey of the major aspects of Central American and Caribbean history from colonial to modern times. Use of selected case studies to illustrate the region's history. Study in inter-American relations. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 337: The History of Mexico - C

The political, economic, social, and cultural changes that have taken place in Mexico from 1350 to the present. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 338: Modern China - C

The beginning of China's modern history, with special emphasis on the genesis of the Chinese revolution and China's position in an increasingly integrated world. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 339: Revolutionary China - C

Beginning in 1911, an examination of the course of the Chinese revolution, China's liberation, and the changes since 1949. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 340: Modern Japan 1868-1945 - C

Beginning with the Meiji Restoration, this course surveys Japanese history from 1868 until 1945. Among the themes covered are the rise of nationalism in Japan, the growth of the Japanese continental and maritime empires, the origins of war with the United States, and the impact of the war on Japanese society. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 344: The Andes in Latin American History - C

The history of the Andean countries (Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador) from the 15th through the 20th centuries. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 348: Lewis and Clark: History and Memory - A

Examines the Lewis and Clark expedition of 1804-1806 and its broader impact, including its costs and consequences for both the expanding U.S. and the people affected by it. Course emphasizes Native American perspectives of the expedition and how it has been depicted and commemorated in U.S. popular culture. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 349: History of the U.S. Civil War

Examines the history of the American Civil War (1861-1865) and its legacies. Course uses a wide range of historical sources to understand the social, political, and military histories of the war itself, as well as how it has been memorialized. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 352: The American Revolution

Study of the era of the American Revolution from the end of the Seven Year's War in 1763 through Thomas Jefferson's defeat of John Adams in 1800. Focuses on both American and British political, social, economic, and ideological conflicts that brought on the Revolution; the military strategy and tactics that won the war for the Americans and lost it for the British; the making of the Constitution and the opposition to it; and the challenges that faced the American people living in the new Republic. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 357: African-American History - A

Experiences, struggles, ideas, and contributions of African-Americans as they developed within and strongly shaped the course of U.S. (and global) history. It focuses simultaneously on major social and legal issues like slavery or Jim Crow segregation and African-Americans' actions and identities framed in the context of systemic white supremacism. It also examines and evaluates aspects of daily life and personal experiences and expressions of individual African-Americans between the 17th century and contemporary times. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 359: History of Women in the United States - A

A focused, thematic examination of issues and evidence related to women's experiences from the colonial period to the present. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 360: The Holocaust: The Destruction of the European Jews - A

Investigation of the development of modern anti-Semitism, its relationship to fascism, the rise of Hitler, the structure of the German dictatorship, the evolution of Nazi Jewish policy, the mechanics of the Final Solution, the nature of the perpetrators, the experience and response of the victims, the reaction of the outside world, and the post-war attempt to deal with an unparalleled crime through traditional judicial procedures. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 362: Christians in Nazi Germany

This course will study the response of Christians in Germany to Hitler and the Holocaust, analyzing why some Christians opposed the regime but also why a large number found Hitler's ideology and policies attractive. Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.(4)

HIST 364: England and the Second World War

This course will consider England's entry into the war, the evacuation from Dunkirk, the Battle of Britain, the arrival of American troops, the air war, the invasion of Normandy, and the implications of the Holocaust, especially in terms of the "Kindertransport" of Jewish children to safety in England. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 369: History of Modern Palestine and Israel

Beginning in the 1880s with the rise of Zionism in Europe, this class will trace the events and issues that led to the creation of Israel as a modern nation in 1948 and subsequent decades of conflict and struggle for Palestinians and Israelis as both societies pursued security and autonomy. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 370: Environmental History of the United States

Uses historical methods to investigate the interrelationship between people and their environment in the United States. Explores the ways in which humans have interacted with, shaped, and been shaped by their physical environments in the past. Examines the fact that nature, too, has a history, one profoundly shaped by humans. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 381: The Vietnam War and American Society

Through the lectures, assigned readings, films and discussions, the course will explore the Vietnam War from the perspectives of the North and South Vietnamese, American elected officials in Washington, D.C., John Q. Public watching the war every night on TV, and the average GI fighting in the highlands and jungle. The lectures are designed to provide an explanation of the origins and development of American involvement in Vietnam from President Eisenhower's decision to support the French to President Nixon's Vietnamization policy and the peace negotiations. They will also examine the consequences and legacy of America's involvement in Vietnam. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 387: Special Topics in U.S. History

This course provides specific opportunities for students to examine chronologically, topically or geographically focused areas of study in U.S. History. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 388: Special Topics in European History

This course provides specific opportunities for students to examine chronologically, topically or geographically focused areas of study in European History. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 389: Special topics in Non-West History

This course provides specific opportunities for students to examine chronologically, topically or geographically focused areas of study in Non-West History. (4) Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.

HIST 460: History of the Western and Pacific Northwest U.S. - A

How “the West” was defined and geographically situated has changed greatly over time. Yet, “the West” - as both a place and an idea - has played a critical role in the development of the American nation. Course explores historiography and the evolving definitions and understandings of region in the United States. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. (4)

HIST 487: Special Topics in History

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HIST 488: Special Topics in History

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HIST 489: Special Topics in History

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

HIST 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

HIST 494: Seminar: American History - SR

Prerequisite: HIST 301. (4)

HIST 495: Internship

A research and writing project in connection with a student's approved off-campus work or travel activity, or a dimension of it. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing plus one course in history, and consent of the department. (1 to 6)

HIST 496: Seminar: Non-Western History - C, SR

This research seminar alternates its focus from East Asia one year to the Caribbean/Latin America the next. Prerequisite: HIST 301. (4)

HIST 497: Seminar: European History - SR

Prerequisite: HIST 301. (4)

IHON 111: Authority and Discovery - H1

Explores through varying disciplinary approaches the historical roots of contemporary global issues through a deep study of selected moments of the past before and during the Italian Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Scientific Revolution. At least one unit on the Far East, the development of Islam, Africa, or other non-western areas of the world are frequently included. (4)

IHON 112: Liberty and Power - H1

Explores through varying disciplinary approaches the historical roots of contemporary global issues through a deep study of selected moments of the past through the Enlightenment, the American and French Revolutions, and the Industrial Revolution. Evolutionary science, medical advances, women’s rights movements, socialism, imperialism, and romanticism in literature and the arts are among topics of study. At least one unit on the Far East and other areas of the non-western world are frequently included. (4)

IHON 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

Inquiry Seminar is designed for first-year students, which wll introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. May fulfill no more than one GenEd. (4)

IHON 253: Gender, Sexuality and Culture - A, H2

Uses multicultural, international, and feminist perspectives to examine issues such as socialization and stereotypes, relationships and sexuality, interpersonal and institutional violence, revolution and social change in the U.S. and in other selected international contexts. (4)

IHON 257: The Human Experience - H2

The Human Experience course is a multidisciplinary study of selected topics that illuminates what it means to be human. Topics will vary by instructor and term but each section of the course will draw from one of the following disciplines: English, Philosophy, Religion, or Languages & Literatures. In addition to the primary discipline of the course, the second discipline may be drawn from the Division of Humanities or from outside of the division. (4)

IHON 258: Self, Culture, and Society - H2

This course is a multidisciplinary study of specific international topics that illuminate aspects of individual and collective human behavior, history, culture and institutions., Topics will vary by instructor and term, but each section of the course will draw from one of the following disciplines: Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology or Sociology. In addition to the primary discipline of the course, the second discipline may be drawn from the Division of Social Sciences or from outside of the division. (4)

IHON 259: The Natural World - H2

This course utilizes a multidisciplinary approach to explore the natural world around and within us and to provide expression of our human inclination to order what we see and to think in quantitative terms. Topics will vary by instructor and term but each section of the course will draw from one of the following disciplines: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science and Computer Engineering, Geosciences, Mathematics, or Physics. In addition to the primary discipline of the course, the second discipline may be drawn from the Division of Natural Sciences or from outside of the division. (4)

IHON 260: The Arts in Society - H2

This course is a multidisciplinary study of selected topics that represents the breadth and influence of arts in society. Topics will vary by instructor and term, but each section of the course will draw from one of the following disciplines: Art, Communication, Music or Theatre. In addition to the primary discipline of the course, the second discipline may be drawn from the School of Arts and Communication or from outside of the School. (4)

IHON 328: Social Justice: Personal Inquiry and Global Investigations - C, H3

Students will wrestle with complex contemporary social problems, evaluate multiple responses to those problems, and develop and articulate their own positions and commitments. Class themes vary, but every section includes cross-cultural and interdisciplinary analysis and a final culminating project. (4)

KINS 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

KINS 277: Foundations of Physical Education

The relationship of physical education to education; the biological, sociological, psychological, and mechanical principles underlying physical education and athletics. Should be the initial professional course taken in the School of Physical Education. (2)

KINS 278: Injury Prevention and Therapeutic Care

Prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of all common injuries sustained in athletics; physical therapy by employment of electricity, massage, exercise, light, ice, and mechanical devices. (2)

KINS 279: Teaching Physical Activity

Generic teaching and management strategies, design of instructional materials and techniques for implementing them, and strategies for working with diverse learners in physical activity settings. This course is a prerequisite for all teaching methods courses and should be taken prior to or in conjunction with the Education Hub. (2)

KINS 280: Fitness and Recreation Programming and Delivery

Focused on the planning, organization, delivery and evaluation of a variety of fitness and recreation activities in school and community settings. Topics and skills addressed include aerobic dance, step aerobics, drumming and creative rhythms, circuit training, core training, and selected recreational activities. Course content aligns to ACSM Group Exercise Instructor certification standards. (4)

KINS 281: Sport Programming and Delivery

Addresses sport skill development, instructional skill development, and programming considerations in a variety of individual and team sport activities. Topics and skills addressed include net games (badminton, tennis, pickleball and/or racquetball), invasion games (soccer, team handball, lacrosse, and/or others), and target/fielding activities (softball, baseball, archery and/or bowling). (4)

KINS 287: Special Topics in Kinesiology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

KINS 288: Special Topics in Kinesiology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

KINS 289: Special Topics in Kinesiology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

KINS 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

KINS 292: First Aid

Meets requirements for the American Red Cross Standard First Aid and Personal Safety. (2)

KINS 293: Teaching Methods: Fitness Activities

Overview, application and evaluation of fitness activities, such as: aerobics (water, high- and low-impact, step, slide), weight training, calisthenics circuits, continuous interval training. Prerequisite: KINS 279. (2)

KINS 294: Teaching Methods: Invasion Games

Games in which a team tries to invade the other team's side or territory by putting an implement into a goal. Activities will include: basketball, soccer, lacrosse, hockey, and football. Prerequisite: KINS 279. (2)

KINS 296: Teaching Methods: Recreation Activities

Learning to plan and implement a variety of recreational activities, including outdoor education. Prerequisite: KINS 279. (2)

KINS 297: Teaching Methods: Net Games

Players attempt to send an object into the playing area on the other side of a net or barrier. Activities include volleyball, tennis, badminton, pickleball, and racquetball. Prerequisite: KINS 279. (2)

KINS 298: Teaching Methods: Target and Fielding Games

Participants strike, hit, kick, or throw at targets or objects. Activities include golf, bowling, archery, softball, kickball, and track and field. Prerequisite: KINS 279. (2)

KINS 314: Team Building for High Performance Teams

Activities designed to facilitate the development of team camaraderie and effectiveness. Creative, fun, challenging, and applied team building activities, combined with traditional training tools to help create learning experiences for students to actively enhance team cohesion and group productivity. (4)

KINS 315: Body Image - A

Topics include: the connection between women and food, cultural definitions of beauty, eating disorders, nutrition, and biosocial factors affecting weight. (4)

KINS 319: Tramping the Tracks of New Zealand - PE

Backpacking several of New Zealand's world renowned tracks and hiking up ancient volcano craters, to glacial mountain lakes, and along sandy ocean beaches. Fulfills one semester hour towards PE GenEd element. (4)

KINS 320: Nutrition, Health and Performance

An examination of the role of dietary choices in the maintenance of health, the prevention of disease and the optimizing of physical performance. Topics covered include: consumer nutrition skills, basic nutrients and nutritional science, energy balance, sport and performance nutrition including the use of supplements and ergogenic aids, lifespan nutrition, global nutrition and food safety. (4)

KINS 322: Physical Education in the Elementary School

Organization and administration of a developmental program for grades K-6; sequential and progressive programming; large repertoire of activities. Observation and/or practicum in public schools is required. (2)

KINS 324: Physical Activity and Lifespan

The emphasis in this course will be on the role that physical activity plays in successful aging. An understanding of the influence of social learning on physical activity behavior through the lifespan and effective strategies for health promotion and activity programming with adult populations will be addressed. (4)

KINS 326: Adapted Physical Activity

Emphasizes the theory and practice of adaptation in teaching strategies, curriculum, and service delivery for all persons with psychomotor problems, not just those labeled "disabled." (4)

KINS 334: Applied Training and Conditioning

This course presents physiological and kinesiological applications to physical training and addresses fundamental training principles as they relate to physical fitness in the areas of cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and body composition. Focus is on training for safe and effective physical performance for both genders of all ages and activity interests. (2)

KINS 360: Professional Practicum

Students work under the supervision of a coach, teacher, recreation supervisor, or health care provider. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. (1 or 2)

KINS 361: Coaching Practicum

Students work under the supervision of a coach. Prerequisite: departmental approval. (1 or 2)

KINS 362: Healing Arts of the Mind and Body - PE

Designed to introduce alternative therapies of mind-body processes. History, roots, practice, and cultural significances of several therapies and practices. Fulfills one semester hour towards PE GenEd. Cross-listed with DANC 362. (4)

KINS 366: Health Psychology

This course examines how human physiology and psychology interact and influence personal health choices and behavior change. Topics surveyed include behavior change models; nicotine, alcohol and drug use and abuse; stress and stress management; psychological factors in the prevention, development and treatment of chronic disease; death and dying. (4)

KINS 380: Exercise Physiology

Scientific basis for training and physiological effect of exercise on the human body. Lab is required. Prerequisite: BIOL 205, 206. (4)

KINS 383: Exercise Testing and Prescription

Provides students involved in the promotion of physical activity with the basic knowledge necessary to safely conduct exercise, health and fitness assessments in a variety of community settings. Topics will include: history of assessment and its role in physical activity promotion; purpose and methods for pre-evaluation and screening; assessment and evaluation techniques; prescriptive program development for health and fitness; bio-psycho-social implications of assessment and evaluation. Prerequisite: KINS 380(4)

KINS 384: Foundations of Health and Fitness Promotion

Provides students involved in the promotion of physical activity with the basic knowledge necessary to understand how health and fitness are managed in a variety of community settings. Topics will include: historical and philosophical basis of community-based health and fitness management; organizational assessment and evaluation issues; strategies for behavioral change; strategies for program development, implementation and marketing; specific examples of different community-based health and fitness management programs. (4)

KINS 386: Social Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity

Questions of how social psychological variables influence motor behavior and how physical activity affects the psychological makeup of an individual will be explored. (4)

KINS 387: Special Topics in Kinesiology

Provides the opportunity for the exploration of current and relevant issues in the areas of physical education and exercise science. (1 to 4)

KINS 388: Special Topics in Kinesiology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

KINS 389: Special Topics in Kinesiology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

KINS 390: Applied Exercise and Sports Psychology

A practical, individually-oriented course designed to teach athletes, trainers, coaches, and teachers a comprehensive variety of skills and techniques aimed at enhancing sport performance. Psychological topics include: managing anxiety, imagery, goal setting, self-confidence, attention control, injury interventions, self-talk strategies, and team building. (4)

KINS 395: Comprehensive School Health

This course explores the integrated nature of comprehensive school health programs. Students will use their health knowledge and resources to effectively communicate essential health content with an emphasis placed on environmental health, intentional and unintentional injury prevention, consumer health and sexuality education. The course addresses program planning, implementation and evaluation based on the needs of the learner. Prerequisites: KINS 320, 366. (4)

KINS 411: Coaching Effectiveness

Presents foundational knowledge essential for coaching effectiveness and success in any sport at a youth, club, or school level. This course integrates sport science research with emphasis on practical applications. Organization of this course will be based on topics such as: coaching philosophy and ethics, communication and motivation, principles of teaching sport skills and tactics, evaluation, and team administration, organization, and management including liability prevention. The course is designed to meet or exceed NCACE, NASPE, PCA, and ASEP standards. (4)

KINS 425: Health Promotion/Wellness Intervention Strategies

Examination of strategies for improving the state of wellness through healthier lifestyles. (2)

KINS 462: Dance Production

An advanced choreography course combining choreography, costume design, staging, and publicity techniques for producing a major dance concert. Cross-listed with DANCE 462. (2)

KINS 478: Motor Learning and Human Performance

Provides basic theories, research, and practical implications for motor learning, motor control, and variables affecting skill acquisition. (4)

KINS 483: Clinical Management for Special Populations

Examination of pathophysiology and the use of exercise to manage chronic diseases and conditions including cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, diabetes, obesity, and other chronic illnesses. Selection and implementation of tests for health related fitness levels in a variety of populations, and the development of exercise prescriptions for patients with known disease. Prerequisite: KINS 383. (4)

KINS 486: Applied Biomechanics and Kinesiology

Opportunity to increase knowledge and understanding about the human body and how the basic laws of mechanics are integrated in efficient motor performance. Prerequisite: BIOL 205. (4)

KINS 487: Special Topics in Kinesiology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

KINS 488: Special Topics in Kinesiology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

KINS 489: Special Topics in Kinesiology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

KINS 490: Curriculum, Assessment and Instruction

An integrated and instructionally aligned approach to curriculum design, assessment, development and implementing instructional strategies consistent with Washington Essential Academic Learning Requirements. Intended as the final course prior to a culminating internship, a practicum in the school setting is required in conjunction with this four-semester hour course. Prerequisites: KINS 279, 281. (4)

KINS 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. Prerequisite: consent of the dean. (1 to 4)

KINS 495: Internship - SR

Pre-professional experiences closely related to student's career and academic interests. Prerequisites: declaration of major, junior status, ten hours in the major, and department permission. (2 to 8)

KINS 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR

To enable senior students in an academic unit to share their work and receive group criticism. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Capstone and may be followed by a specific title designated by the academic unit. Prerequisites: declaration of major, junior status, ten hours in the major, and department permission. (2 or 4)

LANG 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

LANG 271: Literature Around the World - LT

Study of canonical, marginal, and/or emerging works of literature that together articulate a crucial development within an established tradition or shed light on contemporary challenges within a community, be it local, global, or virtual. All readings in English. (4)

LANG 287: Special Topics in Languages

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LANG 288: Special Topics in Languages

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LANG 289: Special Topics in Languages

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LANG 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

LANG 387: Special Topics in Languages

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LANG 388: Special Topics in Languages

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LANG 389: Special Topics in Languages

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LANG 487: Special Topics in Languages

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LANG 488: Special Topics in Languages

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LANG 489: Special Topics in Languages

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LANG 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

LANG 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

LATN 101: Elementary Latin

Basic skills in reading Latin; an introduction to Roman literature and culture. (4)

LATN 102: Elementary Latin

Basic skills in reading Latin; an introduction to Roman literature and culture. LATN 101 or instructor permission. (4)

LATN 211: Intermediate Readings in Latin Prose - C

Readings in selected Classical or Medieval prose. May be retaken as LATN 311 when different material is offered. Prerequisite: LATN 102 or instructor permission. (4)

LATN 212: Intermediate Readings in Latin Poetry - C

Readings from selected Classical or Medieval poetry. May be retaken as LATN 31`2 when different material is offered. Prerequisite: LATN 102 or instructor permission. (4)

LATN 287: Special Topics in Latin

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LATN 288: Special Topics in Latin

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LATN 289: Special Topics in Latin

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LATN 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

LATN 311: Intermediate Readings in Latin Prose - C

Readings in selected Classical or Medieval prose. Prerequisite: Instructor permission is required. (4)

LATN 312: Interm Readings Latin Poetry C

Readings from selected Classical or Medieval poetry. Prerequisite: Instructor permission is required. (4)

LATN 387: Special Topics in Latin

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LATN 388: Special Topics in Latin

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LATN 389: Special Topics in Latin

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LATN 487: Special Topics in Latin

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LATN 488: Special Topics in Latin

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LATN 489: Special Topics in Latin

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

LATN 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

LATN 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

MATH 105: Mathematics of Personal Finance - MR, NS

Emphasizes financial transactions important to individuals and families: annuities, loans, insurance, interest, investment, time value of money. Prerequisite: PLU math entrance requirement. (4)

MATH 107: Mathematical Explorations - MR, NS

Mathematics and modern society. Emphasis on numerical and logical reasoning. Designed to increase awareness of applications of mathematics, to enhance enjoyment of and self-confidence in mathematics, and to sharpen critical thought in mathematics. Topics selected by the instructor. Prerequisite: PLU math entrance requirement. (4)

MATH 115: College Algebra and Trigonometry - MR, NS

A review of algebra emphasizing problem solving skills. The notion of function is introduced via examples from polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions. We also explore inverse trigonometric functions, identities, graphing and solution of triangle. Appropriate as preparation for Math 123, 128 and 140. Prerequisite: PLU math placement exam and two years of high school algebra. (4)

MATH 123: Modern Elementary Mathematics I: Number Sense and Algebraic Sense - MR, NS

Numeration systems and concepts underlying traditional computations. Field axioms, number theory, set theory. Patterns and variables, functions, proportionality, linear versus exponential growth. Emphasis on conceptual understanding of mathematics through problem solving, reasoning, and communication. Analyzing children's problem solving strategies. Intended for elementary teaching majors. Prerequisites: A qualifying score on the math placement test or a grade of C or higher in MATH 115. (4)

MATH 124: Modern Elementary Mathematics II: Measurement, Geometric Sense, Statistics and Probability - MR, NS

The units, systems and processes of measurement. Classification and measurement of geometric objects. Symmetry, transformations, congruence, dilations, similar figures. Display, analysis, and interpretation of data. Basic probability. Emphasis on conceptual understanding of mathematics through problem solving, reasoning, and communication. Analyzing children's problem solving strategies. Intended for elementary teaching majors. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in MATH 123. (4)

MATH 128: Linear Models and Calculus, An Introduction - MR, NS

Matrix theory, linear programming, and introduction to calculus. Concepts developed stressing applications, particularly to business. Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra or MATH 115. Cannot be taken for credit if MATH 151 (or the equivalent) has been previously taken with a grade of C or higher. (4)

MATH 140: Precalculus - MR, NS

Different types of functions, their properties and graphs, especially trigonometric functions. Algebraic skill, problem solving, and mathematical writing are emphasized. Prepares students for calculus. Prerequisites: MATH 115 or equivalent high school material. (4)

MATH 145: Statistics for Biologists - MR, NS

An introduction to statistics with a focus on topics and data relevant to biologists. Descriptive statistics and data representations, correlation and regression, experimental design, basic probability, binomial and normal distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, chi-squared test, ANOVA. Cross-listed with STAT 145. Prerequisite: MATH 140 or proficiency through MATH 140 as determined by the math placement exam. (4)

MATH 151: Introduction to Calculus - MR, NS

Functions, limits, derivatives and integrals with applications. Emphasis on derivatives. Prerequisite: Math analysis or pre-calculus in high school or MATH 140. (4)

MATH 152: Calculus II - MR, NS

Continuation of MATH 151. Techniques and applications of integrals, improper integrals, ordinary differential equations and power series, with applications. Prerequisite: MATH 151. (4)

MATH 203: History of Mathematics - NS

A study in the vast adventure of ideas that is mathematics from ancient cultures to the 20th Century. The evolution of the concepts of number, measurement, demonstration, and the various branches of mathematics in the contexts of the varied cultures in which they arose. Prerequisite: MATH 152 or consent of instructor. (4)

MATH 242: Introduction to Mathematical Statistics - NS

Data description, probability, discrete and continuous random variables, expectations, special distributions, statements of law of large numbers and central limit theorem, sampling distributions, theory of point estimators, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, regression (time permitting). Cross-listed with STAT 242. Previously was MATH/STAT 341. Prerequisite: MATH 151. (4)

MATH 245: Discrete Structures - NS

Topics that are of relevance to computer scientists and computer engineers, including quantified logic, sets, relations, functions, recursion, combinatorics, and probability. Tools of logical reasoning, such as induction, proof by contradiction, and predicate calculus, will be taught and applied. Prerequisite: Math 152. (4)

MATH 253: Multivariable Calculus - NS

An introduction to vectors, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 152. (4)

MATH 287: Special Topics in Mathematics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MATH 288: Special Topics in Mathematics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MATH 289: Special Topics in Mathematics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MATH 291: Directed Study

Supervised study of topics selected to meet the individual's needs or interests; primarily for students awarded advanced placement. Admission only by departmental invitation. (1 to 4)

MATH 317: Introduction to Proof in Mathematics

Introduces the logical methods of proof and abstraction in modern mathematics. Explores mathematical topics, including discrete mathematics, while familiarizing students with proof-related concepts such as mathematical grammar, logical equivalence, proof by contradiction, and proof by induction. Prerequisite: MATH 152. (4)

MATH 321: Geometry - NS

Foundations of geometry and basic theory in Euclidean, projective, and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 152 or consent of instructor. (4)

MATH 331: Linear Algebra - NS

Vectors and abstract vector spaces, matrices, inner product spaces, linear transformations. Proofs will be emphasized. Prerequisites: MATH 152 and one of MATH 245, 253, or 317. (4)

MATH 342: Probability and Statistical Theory

Continuation of MATH 242. Topics may include: joint and conditional distributions, correlation, functions of random variables, moment generating functions, inference in regression and one-way ANOVA, Bayesian and non-parametric inference, convergence of distributions. Cross-listed with STAT 342. Prerequisite: MATH 242. (4)

MATH 348: Applied Regression Analysis and ANOVA

Linear and multiple regression with inference and diagnostics; analysis of variance; experimental design with randomization and blocking. Substantial use of statistical software and emphasis on exploratory data analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 242 or consent of instructor. (4)

MATH 351: Differential Equations - NS

An introduction to differential equations emphasizing the applied aspect. First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, power series solutions, non-linear differential equations, numerical methods. Prerequisite: MATH 253. (4)

MATH 356: Numerical Analysis - NS

Numerical theory and application in the context of solutions of linear, nonlinear, and differential equations, matrix theory, interpolation, approximations, numerical differentiation and integration and Fourier transforms. Prerequisites: MATH 152 and CSCE 144. (4)

MATH 381: Seminar in Problem Solving

Designed to improve advanced problem solving skills for mathematical competitions, especially the Putnam Competition and the Mathematical Contest in Modeling. Pass/Fail only. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (1)

MATH 387: Special Topics in Mathematics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MATH 388: Special Topics in Mathematics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MATH 389: Special Topics in Mathematics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MATH 411: Mathematics of Risk

This non-GenEd course introduces students to the mathematics underpinning financial investment in the presence of uncertainty. Students will investigate and employ probability models to assign values to individual financial instruments and to portfolios over short and long term time frames. Both analytic solutions and numerical solutions via software will be developed. Case studies will play a role in the course. Prerequisites: MATH 152, 242 and 342; ECON 101 or 301; BUSA 335; or consent of the instructor. (4)

MATH 433: Abstract Algebra

The algebra of axiomatically defined objects, such as groups, rings and fields with emphasis on theory and proof. Prerequisites: MATH 317, 331. (4)

MATH 446: Mathematics in the Secondary School

Methods and materials in secondary school math teaching. Basic mathematical concepts; principles of number operation, relation, proof, and problem solving in the context of arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed with EDUC 446. Prerequisite: MATH 253 or 331. (4)

MATH 455: Mathematical Analysis

Theoretical treatment of topics introduced in elementary calculus. Prerequisites: MATH 253, 317 and 331. (4)

MATH 480: Topics in Mathematics

Selected topics of current interest or from: combinatorics, complex analysis, differential geometry, dynamical systems chaos and fractals, graph theory, group representations, number theory, operations research, partial differential equations, topology, transform methods, abstract algebra, analysis. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisites vary depending on the topic. (1 to 4)

MATH 487: Special Topics in Mathematics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MATH 488: Special Topics in Mathematics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MATH 489: Special Topics in Mathematics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MATH 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. Prerequisite: Consent of department chair. (1 to 4)

MATH 495A: Financial Mathematics Internship - SR

A research and writing project in conjunction with a student's approved off-campus activity. An oral presentation comparable in length with those required for MATH 499 is obligatory. Prerequisites: Senior (or second semester junior) financial mathematics major, and approval from the department prior to the commencement of the internship. (2 to 4)

MATH 499A: Capstone: Senior Seminar I - SR

Preparation for oral and written presentation of information learned in individual research under the direction of an assigned instructor. Discussion of methods for communicating mathematical knowledge. Selection of topic and initial research. With MATH 499B meets the senior seminar/project requirement. Prerequisites: MATH 331, senior (or second semester junior) standing, and permission of instructor. (2)

MATH 499B: Capstone: Senior Seminar II - SR

Continuation of MATH 499A with emphasis on individual research and oral and written presentation. With MATH 499A meets the senior seminar/project requirement. Prerequisite: MATH 499A. (2)

MILS 111: Introduction to Military Science

An introduction to the United States Army. Includes an introduction to military science and its organization, leadership, land navigation, map reading, operation orders, and the traditions of the United States Army. Provides a look at the military as a profession and its ethical base. Course includes Army Physical Fitness Test and training. (2)

MILS 112: Introduction to Military Science

An introduction to the United States Army. Includes an introduction to military science and its organization, leadership, land navigation, map reading, operation orders, and the traditions of the United States Army. Provides a look at the military as a profession and its ethical base. Course includes Army Physical Fitness Test and training. (2)

MILS 211: Introduction to Leadership

A continuation of basic officer skills. Areas of emphasis are team building, squad tactics, operations orders, land navigation, ethics and professionalism, total fitness and military first aid. (2)

MILS 212: Introduction to Leadership

A continuation of basic officer skills. Areas of emphasis are team building, squad tactics, operations orders, land navigation, ethics and professionalism, total fitness and military first aid. (2)

MILS 311: Leadership and Management

A survey of leadership/management and motivational theories. An orientation on the competencies required for the small unit leader. Includes tactics, communications and land navigation. (3)

MILS 312: Leadership and Management

A survey of leadership/management and motivational theories. An orientation on the competencies required for the small unit leader. Includes tactics, communications and land navigation. (3)

MILS 411: Professionalism and Ethics

Covers Army values, ethics, and professionalism, responsibilities to subordinates, self, and country, law of land warfare, and the resolution of ethical/value dilemmas. Also covers logistic and justice systems and the interaction of special staff and command functions. (3)

MILS 412: Professionalism and Ethics

Covers Army values, ethics, and professionalism, responsibilities to subordinates, self, and country, law of land warfare, and the resolution of ethical/value dilemmas. Also covers logistic and justice systems and the interaction of special staff and command functions. (3)

MILS 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

MUSI 101: Introduction to Music - AR

Introduction to music literature with emphasis on listening, structure, period, and style. Designed to enhance the enjoyment and understanding of music. Not open to majors. (4)

MUSI 103: History of Jazz - AR

Survey of America's unique art form−Jazz: Emphasis on history, listening, structure, and style from early developments through recent trends. (4)

MUSI 105: The Arts of China - AR, C

Exploration of a number of Chinese art forms, primarily music but also including calligraphy, painting, tai chi, poetry, Beijing opera, film and cuisine. (4)

MUSI 106: Music of Scandinavia - AR, C

Survey of Scandinavian music from the Bronze Age to the present, with primary focus on the music of Norway, Sweden, and Denmark. (4)

MUSI 111: Music Fundamentals I - AR

Develops skills in reading and notating music. Rudiments of musical theory: key signatures, clefs, and major scales. Requires previous musical experience and the ability to read music. Partially fulfills the general education element in arts; may be combined with MUSI 113 in a single semester to complete the general education element in arts. (2)

MUSI 113: Music Fundamentals II - AR

A continuation of MUSI 111. Minor scales, intervals, triads and diatonic 7th chords. Partially fulfills the general education element in arts; may be combined with MUSI 111 in a single semester to complete the general education element in arts. Prerequisite: MUSI 111 or consent of instructor. (2)

MUSI 115: Introduction to Keyboarding - AR

Beginning skills in keyboard performance. Requires no previous keyboard experience. Prerequisite for Music 116; intended for music majors or minors in preparation for keyboard requirements in the music core. Consent of instructor required. (1)

MUSI 116: Basic Keyboarding - AR

A continuation of MUSI 115. Prerequisite: MUSI 115 or consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 120A: Music and Culture - AR, C

Introduction to ethnomusicological considerations of a variety of music traditions. Requires no previous music experience. Required for music majors and minors. Co-requisite Fall term: MUSI 111/113 or consent of department chair. (4)

MUSI 120B: Music and Culture - AR, C

Introduction to ethnomusicological considerations of a variety of music traditions. Requires no previous music experience. Required for music majors and minors. Co-requisite Spring Semester: MUSI 124 or consent of department chair. (4)

MUSI 121: Keyboarding I - AR

Development of keyboarding skills, including sight-reading, group performance, and harmonization of simple melodies. Prerequisite: MUSI 116 or consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 122: Keyboarding II - AR

A continuation of MUSI 121. Prerequisite: MUSI 121 or consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 124: Theory I - AR

An introduction to the workings of music, including common-practice harmony, jazz theory, and elementary formal analysis. Prerequisite: MUSI 113 or consent of instructor. (3)

MUSI 125: Ear Training I - AR

Development of aural skills, including interval recognition, sight-singing, rhythmic, melodic and harmonic dictation. (1)

MUSI 126: Ear Training II - AR

Continuation of MUSI 125. Prerequisite: MUSI 125 or consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

MUSI 201: Private Instruction: Jazz - AR

Prerequisite: Two semesters of non-jazz study (MUSI 202-219) or permission of the director of jazz studies. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 201A for 1 hour; 201B for 2 hours; 201C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 202: Private Instruction: Piano - AR

Prviate instruction for Piano. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 202A for 1 hour; 202B for 2 hours; 202C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 203: Private Instruction:Organ - AR

Private instruction for Organ. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 203A for 1 hour; 203B for 2 hours; 203C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 204: Private Instruction: Voice - AR

Private instruction for Voice. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 204A for 1 hour; 204B for 2 hours; 204C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 205: Private Instruction: Violin/Viola - AR

Private instruction for Violin/Viola. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 205A for 1 hour; 205B for 2 hours; 205C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 206: Private Instruction: Cello/Bass - AR

Private Instruction for Cello/Bass. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 206A for 1 hour; 206B for 2 hours; 206C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 207: Private Instruction: Flute - AR

Prviate instruction for Flute. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 207A for 1 hour; 207B for 2 hours; 207C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 208: Private Instruction: Oboe/English Horn - AR

Private instruction for Oboe/English Horn. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 208A for 1 hour; 208B for 2 hours; 208C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 209: Private Instruction: Bassoon - AR

Private instruction for Bassoon. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 209A for 1 hour; 209B for 2 hours; 209C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 210: Private Instruction: Clarinet - AR

Private instruction for Clarinet. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 210A for 1 hour; 210B for 2 hours; 210C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 211: Private Instruction: Saxophone - AR

Private instruction for Saxophone. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 211A for 1 hour; 211B for 2 hours; 211C for 3 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 212: Private Instruction: Trumpet - AR

Private instruction for Trumpet. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 212A for 1 hour; 212B for 2 hours; 212C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 213: Private Instruction: French Horn - AR

Private instruction for French Horn. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 213A for 1 hour; 213B for 2 hours; 213C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 214: Private Instruction: Trombone - AR

Private instruction for Trombone. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 214A for 1 hour; 214B for 2 hours; 215C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 215: Private Instruction: Baritone/Tuba - AR

Private instruction for Baritone/Tuba. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 215A for 1 hour; 215B for 2 hours; 215C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 217: Private Instruction: Guitar - AR

Private instruction for Guitar. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 217A for 1 hour; 217B for 2 hours; 217C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 218: Private Instruction:Harp - AR

Private instruction for Harp. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 218A for 1 hour; 218B for 2 hours; 218C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 219: Private Instruction: Harpsichord AR

Private instruction for Harpsichord. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 219A for 1 hour; 219B for 2 hours; 219C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 223: Theory II - AR

A continuation of MUSI 124. Prerequisite: MUSI 124 or consent of instructor. (3)

MUSI 224: Jazz Theory Laboratory - AR

Introduction to jazz harmony, structure, style, and improvisation. Prerequisite: MUSI 223 or consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 225: Ear Training III - AR

A continuation of MUSI 126. Prerequisite: MUSI 126 or consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 226: Ear Training IV - AR

A continuation of MUSI 225. Prerequisite: MUSI 225 or consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 234: Music History I - AR

The evolution of Western music from the early Christian era through the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque eras. Prerequisite: MUSI 223 or consent of instructor. (3)

MUSI 240: Foundations of Music Education

Introduction to the basics of teaching music, including philosophy, content, student characteristics, and the nature and organization of musical learning. For students preparing to become music specialists (music education majors only). (3)

MUSI 241: String Laboratory I

Methods and materials of teaching and playing string instruments in the public schools. (1)

MUSI 242: String Laboratory II

Methods and materials of teaching and playing string instruments in the public schools. Prerequisite: MUSI 241. (1)

MUSI 243: Woodwind Laboratory I

Methods and materials of teaching and playing woodwind instruments in the public schools. (1)

MUSI 244: Woodwind Laboratory II

Methods and materials of teaching and playing woodwind instruments in the public schools. Prerequisite: MUSI 243. (1)

MUSI 245: Brass Laboratory I

Methods and materials of teaching and playing brass instruments in the public schools. (1)

MUSI 246: Brass Laboratory II

Methods and materials of teaching and playing brass instruments in the public schools. Prerequisite: MUSI 245. (1)

MUSI 247: Percussion Laboratory

Methods and materials of teaching and playing percussion instruments in the public schools. (1)

MUSI 248: Voice Laboratory

Methods and materials of vocal pedagogy and solo vocal performance in the public schools. (1)

MUSI 287: Special Topics in Music

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MUSI 288: Special Topics in Music

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MUSI 289: Special Topics in Music

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MUSI 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

MUSI 320: On Creativity - AR

On Creativity is an exploration through readings and projects of the creative impluse, the creative state, the creative process, and the creative act in all fields of human activity from the arts to science to business. Open to all students. May not be repeated for credit. (4)

MUSI 327: Composition AR

A systematic approach to contemporary musical composition; student create and notate works for solo, small and large ensembles. May be repeated for additional credit. Private instruction; special fee in addition to tuition. Student register in 327A for 1 hour; 327B for 2 hours; 327C for 3 or 4 hours.

MUSI 327A: Composition - AR

A systematic approach to contemporary musical composition; students create and notate works for solo, small and large ensembles. May be repeated for additional credit. Private instruction; special fee in addition to tuition. (1)

MUSI 327B: Composition - AR

A systematic approach to contemporary musical composition; students create and notate works for solo, small and large ensembles. May be repeated for additional credit. Private instruction; special fee in addition to tuition. (2)

MUSI 327C: Composition - AR

A systematic approach to contemporary musical composition; students create and notate works for solo, small and large ensembles. May be repeated for additional credit. Private instruction; special fee in addition to tuition. (3 or 4)

MUSI 328: Electronic Media

Application of electronic media and techniques to compositional process. Private instruction; special fee in addition to tuition. May be repeated for credit. Students register in 328A for 1 hour; 328B for 2 hours; 328C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 333: Music History II - AR

The evolution of Western music in the Classic and Romantic eras. Prerequisite: MUSI 234 or consent of instructor. (3)

MUSI 334: Twentieth Century Music - AR

The evolution of Western art music in the 20th century in response to new theoretical constructs, new technologies, and popular and cross-cultural influences. Prerequisite: MUSI 333 or consent of instructor. (3)

MUSI 336: Making Music

Continued study, development and application of music skills through composition, counterpoint, improvisation, conducting, and orchestration. Prerequisite: MUSI 224, 226, or consent of instructor. (3)

MUSI 337: Analyzing Music

Application of theoretical knowledge toward developing analytical skills in a variety of musical cultures, styles, and genre. Prerequisite: MUSI 224 or consent of instructor. (3)

MUSI 340: Fundamentals: Music Education

Detailed planning of curricula for various musical skills at different grade levels, including improvisation laboratory. Prerequisite: MUSI 240. (2)

MUSI 341: Music for Classroom Teachers

Methods and procedures in teaching elementary school music as well as infusing the arts in the curriculum. Offered for students preparing for elementary classroom teaching (non-music education majors). Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in EDUC 390: Inquiry into Learning I. (2)

MUSI 343: Methods and Materials for Secondary General Music

Methods and materials for teaching general music in the secondary school. (1)

MUSI 345: Conducting I - AR

Introduction to basic patterns, gestures, and conducting techniques. (1)

MUSI 346: Conducting II

Continuation of MUSI 345; observation of advanced conducting students in laboratory ensemble. (1)

MUSI 347: Adaptive Music

Techniques and strategies to meet the needs, interests, limitations, and capacities of students who have restrictions placed on their musical activity. (1)

MUSI 348: Practicum in Music Education

Field experience teaching in elementary, middle or junior high school; provides laboratory experience in teaching prior to full student teaching experience. Prerequisite: MUSI 340; recommended: enroll fall semester preceding student teaching. (1)

MUSI 351: Accompanying - AR

Laboratory experience in accompanying representative vocal and instrumental solo literature in the soloist's private lesson studio. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 352: Organ Improvisation - AR

Basic techniques of improvisation, particularly as related to humn tunes. Private instruction: Special Fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 353: Solo Vocal Literature - AR

Survey of solo vocal literature. (2)

MUSI 354: History of Music Theatre - AR

A general survey of the evolution of "Drama per Musica" from opera to musical comedy including in-depth study of selected scores. (2)

MUSI 355: Diction I (English/Italian) - AR

An introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and its practical applications for singers of English and Italian texts. (1)

MUSI 356: Diction II (French/German)

Continuation of MUSI 355 with applications for singers of French and German texts. (1)

MUSI 358: Early Music Laboratory

Exploration of solo and small ensemble literature from the Baroque period and earlier, focusing on range of repertoire, performance practices, and period instruments. Rehearsal and performance augmented by listening, research, and writing. Prerequisite: MUSI 234 or consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 360: Choir of the West - AR

A study of a wide variety of choral literature and technique through rehearsal and performance of both sacred and secular music. Auditions at the beginning of fall semester. (1)

MUSI 361: University Chorale - AR

A study of choral literature and technique through rehearsal and performance of both sacred and secular music. Auditions at the beginning of fall semester. (1)

MUSI 362: University Men's Chorus - AR

The study and performance of repertoire for men's voices. Emphasis on individual vocal and musical development. (1)

MUSI 363: University Singers - AR

The study and performance of repertoire for women's voices. Emphasis on individual vocal and musical development. (1)

MUSI 365: Chapel Choir - AR

Repertoire experience with appropriate literature for ongoing church music programs of a liturgical nature. Regular performances for university chapel worship. Participation without credit available. (1)

MUSI 366: Opera - AR

Production of chamber opera, opera scenes, and full operas. Participation in all facets of production. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 368: University Choral Union - AR

Rehearsal and performance of major works in the choral/orchestral repertoire. Open to the community as well as PLU students; membership by audition. Special fee in addition to tuition. (1)

MUSI 370: University Wind Ensemble - AR

Study and performance of selected wind and percussion literature using various size ensembles. Membership by audition. (1)

MUSI 371: University Concert Band - AR

Study of selected band literature through rehearsal and performance. Designed for the general university student. Prerequisite: having played instrument through at least junior year of high school or consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 375: University Jazz Ensemble - AR

Study of selected big band literature through rehearsal and performance. Membership by audition. (1)

MUSI 380: University Symphony Orchestra - AR

Study of selected orchestral literature through rehearsal and performance. Membership by audition. (1)

MUSI 381: Chamber Ensemble - AR

Reading, rehearsal, and performance of selected instrumental chamber music. Sections offered in string, brass, woodwind, early instruments, guitar, jazz and world music. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 383: Piano Ensemble - AR

Techniques and practice in the performance of two-piano and piano duet literature; includes sight reading and program planning. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (1)

MUSI 387: Special Topics in Music

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MUSI 388: Special Topics in Music

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MUSI 389: Special Topics in Music

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MUSI 390: Intensive Performance Study: Ensemble Tour - AR

Intensive study and rehearsal of your repertoire; off-campus tour of major performance venues; special fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (4)

MUSI 391: Intensive Performance Study: Conservatory Experience

Intensive study and practice of solo repertoire; special fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (4)

MUSI 395: Music Centers of the World - AR

Exploration of music and other arts in environments off campus. Offered January Term to facilitate study abroad, or in cultural centers of the United States. (4)

MUSI 398: Keystone: Introduction to Music Research

Introduction to principles and standards relevant to academic research in music, exploration of common research materials and experience with practices and techniques in this field. (2)

MUSI 399: Keystone: Junior Recital

Preparation and presentation of a juried half recital, normally in the junior year. Declared Bachelor of Music majors only. Private instruction; special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 399A for 1 hour; 399B for 2 to 4 hours.Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required. (1 to 4)

MUSI 401: Private Instruction:Jazz AR

Prerequisite: Two semesters of non-jazz study (202-219) or permission of the Director of Jazz Studies. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 401A for 1 hour; 401B for 2 hours; 401C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 402: Private Instruction: Piano - AR

Private instruction for Piano. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 402A for 1 hour; 402B for 2 hours; 402C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 405: Private Instruction: Violin/Viola - AR

Private instruction for Violin/Viola. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 405A for 1 hour; 405B for 2 hours; 405C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 406: Private Instruction: Cello/Bass - AR

Private instruction for Cello/Bass. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 406A for 1 hour; 406B for 2 hours; 406C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 407: Private Instruction: Flute - AR

Private instruction for Flute. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 407A for 1 hour; 407B for 2 hours; 407C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 408: Private Instruction: Oboe/English Horn - AR

Private instruction for Oboe/English Horn. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 408A for 1 hour; 408B for 2 hours; 408C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 409: Private Instruction:Bassoon - AR

Private instruction for Bassoon. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 409A for 1 hour; 409B for 2 hours; 409C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 410: Private Instruction: Clarinet - AR

Private instruction for Clarinet. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 410A for 1 hour; 410B for 2 hours; 410C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 411: Private Instruction: Saxophone - AR

Private instruction for Saxophone. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 411A for 1 hour; 411B for 2 hours; 411C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 412: Private Instruction: Trumpet - AR

Private instruction for Trumpet. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 412A for 1 hour; 412B for 2 hours; 412C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 413: Private Instruction: French Horn - AR

Private instruction for French Horn. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 413A for 1 hour; 413B for 2 hours; 413C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 414: Private Instruction: Trombone - AR

Private instruction for Tombone. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 414A for 1 hour; 414B for 2 hours; 414C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 415: Private Instruction: Baritone/Tuba - AR

Private instruction for Baritone/Tuba. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 415A for 1 hour; 415B for 2 hours; 415C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 416: Private Instruction: Percussion - AR

Private instruction for Percussion. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 416A for 1 hour; 416B for 2 hours; 416C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 417: Private Instruction: Guitar - AR

Private instruction for Guitar. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 417A for 1 hour; 417B for 2 hours; 417C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 418: Private Instruction: Harp - AR

Private instruction for Harp. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 418A for 1 hour; 418B for 2 hours; 418C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 419: Private Instruction: Harpsichord - AR

Private instruction for Harpsichord. Special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in 419A for 1 hour; 419B for 2 hours; 419C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 420: Private Instruction: Pedagogy - AR

Methods and materials for teaching specific instrumental media in the studio; special fee in addition to tuition. Students register in MUSI 420A for 1 hour and 420B for 2 hours. (1 or 2)

MUSI 421: Advanced Keyboarding Skills - AR

Focused study of specialized keyboard skills required in various music major programs. Private instruction; special fee in addition to tuition. May be repeated for additional credit. Students are registered in 421A for 1 hour; 421B for 2 hours; 421C for 3 or 4 hours. Prerequisite: MUSI 122 (with grade of C or better and successful completion of Keyboard Proficiency Jury and sophomore B.M. or B.M.E. Jury. (1 to 4)

MUSI 427: Advanced Orchestration/Arranging - AR

Continuation of MUSI 336 on an individual basis. Prerequisite: MUSIC 336 or consent of instructor. May be repeated for additional credit. Private instruction; special fee in addition to tuition. Students are registered in 427A for 1 hour; 427B for 2 hours; 427C for 3 or 4 hours. (1 to 4)

MUSI 430: Piano Literature I - AR

Study of representative piano repertoire from the 18th and early 19th Century. (2)

MUSI 431: Piano Literature II - AR

Study of representative piano compositions of the late 19th and 20th Century. (2)

MUSI 440: Methods and Materials for K-9 Music I

Study of skill acquisitions, music concepts, and analyzing the range of available resources, including ethnic music and computer assisted instruction. Offered for music education majors only. Prerequisite: MUSI 340. (2)

MUSI 441: Methods and Materials for K-9 Music II

Continuation of MUSI 440, including emphasis on Orff-Schulwerk and Kodaly techniques. Offered for music education majors only. Prerequisite: MUSI 440. (2)

MUSI 443: Methods of Secondary Choral Music

The organization and administration of the secondary school choral program. Prerequisite: MUSI 340. (2)

MUSI 444: Materials of Secondary Choral Music

Survey of choral literature appropriate for the various age and experience levels of students in grades 4-12, including sources and research techniques. Prerequisite: MUSI 340. (2)

MUSI 445: Conducting III

Refinement of patterns, gestures, and conducting techniques; application to appropriate vocal and instrumental scores. Prerequisite: MUSI 346 or consent of instructor; Section A (Instrumental); Section B (Choral). (1)

MUSI 446: Conducting IV

Continuation of MUSI 445; application and development of skills in laboratory ensemble. Prerequisite: MUSI 445 or consent of instructor; Section A - Instrumental, Section B - Choral. (1)

MUSI 447: Methods of School Band Music

The organization and administration of the secondary school band program. Prerequisite: MUSI 340. (2)

MUSI 448: Materials for School Band Music

Survey of wind-percussion literature appropriate for the various age and experience levels of students in grades 4-12, including sources and research techniques. Prerequisite: MUSI 340. (2)

MUSI 451: Piano Pedagogy I - AR

Teaching techniques for prospective teachers of piano, including techniques for individual and group instruction. Methods and materials from beginning to intermediate level. (2)

MUSI 452: Piano Pedagogy II

Teaching techniques for prospective teachers of piano, including techniques for individual and group instruction. Methods and materials from intermediate to advanced levels. (2)

MUSI 453: Vocal Pedagogy - AR

Physiological, psychological, and pedagogical aspects of singing. (2)

MUSI 454: Instrumental Pedagogy

Methods and materials for teaching specific instrumental media in the studio. Offered on demand for string, wind, guitar, harp, organ and percussion. (2)

MUSI 455: String Pedagogy

Teaching techniques for prospective teachers of strings with emphasis on individual student instruction. Methods and materials from beginning through advanced levels. (2)

MUSI 456: Methods and Materials for School Strings

The organization and administration of school string programs, elementary through secondary. (2)

MUSI 457: Instrumental Music for Choral Educators

Materials and methods for teaching instrumental music in an ensemble setting. Offered for choral music education majors only. (2)

MUSI 458: Choral Music for Instrumental Educators

Materials and methods for teaching choral music in an ensemble setting. Offered for instrumental music educaiton majors only. (2)

MUSI 469: Student Teaching Seminar

Student teaching experiences shared and analyzed; exploration of related issues regarding entering the public school music teaching profession. Concurrent enrollment with EDUC 468 required. (2)

MUSI 487: Special Topics in Music

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MUSI 488: Special Topics in Music

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MUSI 489: Special Topics in Music

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

MUSI 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for additional credit. (1 to 4)

MUSI 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

MUSI 498: Music Research Seminar

Continuation of MUSI 398, culminating in an initial draft of the capstone project research paper required in the B.M.A. and B.A. in music degrees. Prerequisite: MUSI 398. Co-requisite: MUSI 499A or 499B. (2)

MUSI 499: Capstone: Senior Project - SR

A culminating project of substantial proportions, presented in a public forum, undertaken in the senior year. For the Bachelor of Arts degree, the project integrates musical studies with a broader liberal arts context; for the Bachelor of Musical Arts degree, the project integrates musical studies with the cognate field; for Bachelor of Music Education and Bachelor of Music degrees, the project consists of a juried recital. Private instruction; special fee in addition to tuition. Students register first in 499A for 1 hour and then in the next term 499B for 2 to 4 hour option. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (1 to 4)

NORW 101: Elementary Norwegian

Basic skills in speaking, reading, listening and writing are introduced and practiced in an interactive classroom atmosphere. Readings introduce contemporary Norwegian culture and society. (4)

NORW 102: Elementary Norwegian

Basic skills in speaking, reading, listening and writing are introduced and practiced in an interactive classroom atmosphere. Readings introduce contemporary Norwegian culture and society. (4)

NORW 201: Intermediate Norwegian - C

Continuing development of written and oral skills, with a review of basic grammar, development of short essay writing, an emphasis on conversation, and an introductory overview of Norwegian history and society. Readings also offer insights into contemporary culture and provide springboards for students to express their own opinions. Prerequisite: NORW 102. (4)

NORW 202: Intermediate Norwegian - C

Continuing development of written and oral skills, with a review of basic grammar, development of short essay writing, an emphasis on conversation, and an introductory overview of Norwegian history and society. Readings also offer insights into contemporary culture and provide springboards for students to express their own opinions. Prerequisite: NORW 102. (4)

NORW 287: Special Topics in Norwegian

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NORW 288: Special Topics in Norwegian

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NORW 289: Special Topics in Norwegian

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NORW 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

NORW 301: Conversation & Composition - C

Review of grammar, and development of advanced written and oral skills. Contemporary fiction, non-fiction and film serve as models of style and usage, and as the basis for conversation and writing. Prerequisite: NORW 202. (4)

NORW 302: Advanced Conversation and Composition - C

Emphasizes the finer points of grammar and stylistics, focusing on the production of advanced written compositions and further refinement of conversational skills. Readings are drawn from literature spanning the last two centuries, and serve as the springboard for discussion. Prerequisite: NORW 301. (4)

NORW 331: Language & Identity: Norwegian in a Nordic Context - C

The nations of the Nordic region provide excellent contexts within which to study the assertion of identity as promoted in the age of nation building and challenged in the age of globalization and migration. The course explores Norwegian language and identity with one or more additional Nordic countries. (4)

NORW 387: Special Topics in Norwegian

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NORW 388: Special Topics in Norwegian

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NORW 389: Special Topics in Norwegian

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NORW 487: Special Topics in Norwegian

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NORW 488: Special Topics in Norwegian

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NORW 489: Special Topics in Norwegian

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NORW 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

NORW 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

NORW 499: Capstone: Senior Project - SR

To enable senior students in an academic unit to share their work and receive group criticism. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Capstone and may be followed by a specific title designated by the academic unit. (4)

NSCI 210: Natural History of Hawaii - NS, SM

The Hawaiian Islands are an active museum of geology and tropical island plant and animal life. The islands, the most isolated in the world, have native plants and animals - 95 percent of which occur nowhere else. Students are expected to participate actively in daily lectures and fieldwork involving the geologic formation of Hawaii and its subsequent population by plants and animals, stressing the impact of human intervention. (4)

NURS 100: Medical Terminology

Provides sound basis for individuals in health care to learn important words, their origins, derivatives, and abbreviations. Focuses on utilization of terms as applied to anatomical, physiological, and pharmacological topics. Pronunciation of terms emphasized. Knowledge from this course can be applied to any health care profession. Open to non-nursing majors, required for Health Services minor. (1 or 2)

NURS 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

NURS 220: Nursing Competencies I

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies of therapeutic communication, and technical skills associated with health management. Includes a clinical practicum 50-64 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 205, 206; CHEM 105, PSYC 101. Pre- or Co-requisites: BIOL 201, PSYC 320. (4)

NURS 260: Professional Foundations I

Focuses on nursing as a profession and discipline. The nursing process is introduced as a framework for critical thinking and caring. Open to non-nursing students with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: NURS 220. (4)

NURS 270: Health Assessment and Promotion

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to perform health assessments and promote health across the life span. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent with NURS 260 and 280. (4)

NURS 280: Human Pathological Processes

Focuses on human responses to major forms of pathophysiology. Prerequisites: Majors complete BIOL 201, 206 and CHEM 105. Non-majors must receive permission from the instructor. (4)

NURS 287: Special Topics in Nursing

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NURS 288: Special Topics in Nursing

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NURS 289: Special Topics in Nursing

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NURS 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

NURS 320: Nursing Competencies II

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies of advanced technical skills associated with health management. Prerequisites: NURS 260, 270, 280, Junior I status. (2)

NURS 330: Pharmacology and Therapeutic Modalities for Nursing

Focuses on pharmacological principles of major drug classifications, therapeutic modalities, and alternatives to pharmacological interventions. Prerequisite for majors: NURS 280, achievement of Junior I status. Non-majors must receive permission from the instructor. (4)

NURS 340: Nursing Situations with Individuals: Adult Health I

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with individuals experiencing selected alterations in health. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 320 and 330, achievement of Junior I status. (4)

NURS 350: Nursing Situations with Individuals: Mental Health

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with individuals experiencing mental health issues. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 330, achievement of Junior I status. (4)

NURS 360: Nursing Research and Informatics

Examines principles of nursing and health care research, technologies, and databases that support evidence-based nursing practice. Prerequisites: STAT 231, concurrent or prior completion of NURS 340 or 350, achievement of Junior II status. (4)

NURS 365: Culturally Congruent Health Care - A

Focuses on core knowledge and competencies necessary to give culturally congruent care to people from diverse populations. Compares beliefs, values, and practices pertaining to health, care expressions, and well-being. Open to non-nursing students with instructor permission. Prerequisite for majors: NURS 270, achievement of Junior II status. (4)

NURS 370: Nursing Situations with Families: Childbearing

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with childbearing families. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 320, 330, 340, 350, achievement of Junior II status. (4)

NURS 380: Nursing Situations with Families: Childrearing

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with infants, children, adolescents and their families. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 320, 330, 340, 350, achievement of Junior II status. (4)

NURS 387: Special Topics in Nursing

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NURS 388: Special Topics in Nursing

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NURS 389: Special Topics in Nursing

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NURS 399: Nursing Portfolio Workshop

Portfolio writing designated to prepare registered nurses to complete a portfolio documenting prior experiential learning acquired in nursing practice. Open to A,D.N. to B.S.N. students only. (4)

NURS 420: Introduction to Leadership and Resource Management in Nursing

Focuses on core knowledge and competencies related to beginning leadership and resource management skills. Prerequisites: NURS 360, 370, 380, achivement of Senior I status. (4)

NURS 430: Nursing Situations with Communities

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with the community as client. Includes a clinical 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 420, achievement of Senior I status. (5)

NURS 440: Nursing Situations with Individuals: Adult Health II

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with individuals experiencing complex alterations in health. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 360, 370, and 380, achievement of Senior I status. (4)

NURS 441: Senior Seminar

Exploration and integration of core knowledge and competencies related to complex alterations in the health of individuals experiencing complex alterations in health. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 440 and achievement of Senior I status. (1)

NURS 460: Health Care Systems and Policy

Analysis of the social, political, legal, and economic factors that influence health care including trends in health policy and ethical issues relevant to health care delivery. Open to non-nursing students with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite for majors: NURS 260, Senior II status. (2)

NURS 478: Elective Clinical Experience

An exploration and application of nursing knowledge and roles in a selected clinical environment. Each credit requires a minimum of 42 hours of clinical. Pass/fail option. Open to students who have completed their junior-level nursing courses and have permission of the dean of the School of Nursing. (1 to 4)

NURS 480: Professional Foundations II

Critical evaluation of role transition into professional nursing. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in NURS 499, achievement of Senior II status. (2)

NURS 487: Special Topics in Nursing

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NURS 488: Special Topics in Nursing

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NURS 489: Special Topics in Nursing

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

NURS 491: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Permission of the dean. (1 to 4)

NURS 499: Capstone: Nursing Synthesis - SR

Synthesis of core knowledge, competencies, professional values, and leadership skills in nursing situations mentored by a professional nurse preceptor. Includes a clinical practicum 252-356 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 420, 430, 440, 441, prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 460 and 480, and achievement of Senior II status. (6)

PHED 100: Personalized Fitness Program - PE

To stimulate student interest in functional personally designed programs of physical activity; assessment of physical condition and skills; recommendation of specific programs for maintaining and improving physical health. Should be taken as a first-year student. (1)

PHED 150: Adaptive Physical Activity - PE

An individualized physical activity course designed to meet the needs of students with diagnosed disabilities or long-term injury who, because of their medical condition, are unable to be accommodated through regular activity courses offered in the department. (1)

PHED 151: Beginning Golf - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in beginning golf. (1)

PHED 155: Bowling - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in bowling. (1)

PHED 162: Beginning Tennis - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in tennis. (1)

PHED 163: Beginning Badminton - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in badminton. (1)

PHED 164: Pickleball - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in pickleball. (1)

PHED 165: Racquetball/Squash - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in racqueball/squash. (1)

PHED 170: Skiing - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in skiing. (1)

PHED 173: Mountaineering - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in mountaineering. (1)

PHED 175: Snowboarding - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in snowboarding. (1)

PHED 177: Weight Training - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in weight training. (1)

PHED 182: Low Impact Aerobics - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in low impact aerobics. (1)

PHED 183: Power Aerobics - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in power aerobics. (1)

PHED 186: Step Aerobics - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in step aerobics. (1)

PHED 188: Boot Camp Conditioning - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in boot camp conditioning. (1)

PHED 192: Intermediate Tennis - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in intermediate tennis. (1)

PHED 197: Advanced Weight Training - PE

Individual and Dual Activities Course in advanced weight training. (1)

PHED 200: Individual Swim Instruction - PE

Aquatics course in individual swim instruction. (1)

PHED 201: Swimming for Non-Swimmers - PE

Aquatics course in swimming for non-swimmers. (1)

PHED 205: Skin & Scuba Diving - PE

Aquatics course in skin and scuba diving. (1)

PHED 207: Basic Sailing - PE

Aquatics course in basic sailing. (1)

PHED 212: Conditioning Swimming - PE

Aquatics course in conditioning swimming. (1)

PHED 216: Lifeguard Training - PE

Aquatics course in lifeguard training. (1)

PHED 222: Jazz Dance Level I - PE

Rhythms course in jazz dance level I. (1)

PHED 223: Yoga - PE

Rhythms course in yoga. (1)

PHED 224: Salsa and Swing Dance - PE

Rhythms course in salsa and swing dance. (1)

PHED 225: Ballroom Dance - PE

Rhythms course in ballroom dance. (1)

PHED 234: Relaxation Techniques - PE

Rhythms course in relaxation techniques. (1)

PHED 240: Dance Ensemble - PE

Rhythms course in dance ensemble. (1)

PHED 241: Co-Ed Basketball - PE

Team Activities course in co-ed basketball. (1)

PHED 244: Co-Ed Volleyball - PE

Team activities course in co-ed volleyball. (1)

PHED 248: World Games and Sports - PE

Team Activities course in world games and sports. (1)

PHED 250: Directed Sports - PE

Team Activities course in directed sports. (1)

PHED 276: Special Topics in Physical Activity - PE

Selected activities as announced by the department. Provides opportunities for activities not otherwise part of the regular activity course offerings. (1)

PHIL 121: The Examined Life - PH

Introduces philosophy by considering perennial topics and issues, such as what makes an action right or wrong and whether belief in God is reasonable. Includes a focus on developing skills in critical and systematic thinking. (4)

PHIL 125: Ethics and the Good Life - PH

Major moral theories of Western civilization, including contemporary moral theories. Critical application to selected moral issues. (4)

PHIL 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

PHIL 220: Women and Philosophy - A, PH

An examination and critique of historically important theories from Western philosophy concerning women's nature and place in society, followed by an examination and critique of the writings of women philosophers, historic and contemporary. (4)

PHIL 223: Biomedical Ethics - PH

An examination of significant controversies in contemporary biomedical ethics, of major moral philosophies, and of their interrelationships. (4)

PHIL 224: Military Ethics - PH

An examination of major ethical theories (Aristotle, Kant and Mill) and their applications to current moral issues in warfare and the military, including: morality of war, laws of war, military culture and the warrior ethos, the role of the military in international affairs and terrorism. (4)

PHIL 225: Business Ethics - PH

Application of moral theories and perspectives of relevance to business practices. Examination of underlying values and assumptions in specific business cases involving, e.g., employer-employee relations, advertising, workplace conflict, and environmental and social responsibilities. Pass/fail options do not apply to business majors either declared or intending to declare. (4)

PHIL 226: Environmental Ethics - PH

Apply ethical theories to determine what we should do in the face of environmental issues and dilemmas such as whether and why anmials have rights, what kind of value nature possesses, the proper focus of an environmental ethic, and what ecology has to do with economics and justice. (4)

PHIL 227: Philosophy and Race - A, PH

An examination of philosophical assumptions behind concepts of race. Beginning with the question "what is race?" the course addresses the notion of racial identities, metaphysical issues surrounding racial designations, and the ethical/political effects of such questions. (4)

PHIL 228: Social and Political Philosophy - PH

An examination of major social and political theories of Western philosophy (including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Marx). Includes feminist and non-Western contributions and critiques. Can count for a Political Science minor. (4)

PHIL 233: Formal Logic

Principles of sound reasoning and argument. Development and practical use of formal logical systems, with a focus on symbolic logic. Includes an introduction to inductive and abductive reasoning. Not for philosophy core requirement; counts toward Option III of the College of Arts and Sciences requirement. (4)

PHIL 238: Existentialism and the Meaning of Life - PH

An introduction to the philosophical movement known as Existentialism. The course will explore themes central to human experience (such as alienation, guilt, suffering, joy and boredom), with a goal of asking how existentialism engages these ideas relative to the question of human meaning. As an introductory course we will survey specifically the major thinkers of this tradition and illustrate how existentialism connects to other areas such as religion, psychology and literature. (4)

PHIL 239: Philosophy of Love and Sex - PH

An examination of philosophical issues surrounding theories and attitudes concerning intimacy, with special attention given to the ethical issues involving love and sex. (4)

PHIL 240: Science, Reason, and Reality - PH

Investigates influential 20th-century understandings of science's aims, methods, and limits. Includes concerns raised by Thomas Kuhn and others about the rationality of science and its ability to provide objective knowledge. (4)

PHIL 253: Creation and Evolution - PH

Examination of the controversy surrounding the origin of life. Includes a historical introduction to the controversy; investigation into the nature of science, faith, evidence, and facts; and critical evaluation of three major origin theories: creationism, theistic evolution, and non-theistic evolution. (4)

PHIL 287: Special Topics in Philosophy - PH

Explores an area of contemporary interest through the lens of philosophical inquiry. Acquaints students with the questions, methods, and skills of philosophy. May be repeated once for credit. (4)

PHIL 288: Special Topics in Philosphy

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHIL 289: Special Topics in Philosophy

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHIL 291: Directed Studies

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

PHIL 327: Philosophy, Animals, and the Environment - PH

Examines concepts such as wilderness, nature/natural, and consciousness. This examination leads to consideration of issues such as resource distribution and consumption, obligations to future generations and other than human life. Specifically the preservation of endangered species, animal experimentation, farming, resource consumption, pollution, and population growth will be addressed. (4)

PHIL 328: Philosophical Issues in the Law - PH

An examination of philosophical issues in law using actual cases as well as philosophical writings. Topics may include the nature of law, judicial reasoning, rights, liberty, responsibility, and punishment. Prerequisite: One previous philosophy course, or POLS 170, or permission of instructor. (4)

PHIL 331: Ancient Philosophy - PH

The development of philosophical thought and methods from the Pre-Socratic period to the end of the fourth century CE. Emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. (4)

PHIL 333: Early Modern Philosophy - PH

The development of European and British philosophy from the 17th through the early 19th centuries. Figures may include Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. (4)

PHIL 334: Kant and the Nineteenth Century - PH

An examination of Kant's critical project and the philosophical responses that followed. Special attention given to Fichte, Hegel, Schelling, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzche. (4)

PHIL 335: The Analytic Tradition - PH

The development of Anglo-American philosophy from the late 19th century to the mid-20th century. Figures include Moore, Russell, Ayer, and Wittgenstein. Prerequisite: One philosophy course. (4)

PHIL 336: Pragmatism and American Philosophy - PH

An examination of such figures as Peirce, James and Dewey, as well as extensions and critiques of pragmatism (such as Alain Locke, Jane Addams, Josiah Royce, Alfred N. Whitehead). Links with current feminist and continental thought will be explored. (4)

PHIL 338: Continental Philosophy - PH

Focus on recent issues in contemporary Continental philosophy such as hermeneutics, phenomenology and existentialism, and critical social theory. (4)

PHIL 350: God, Faith, and Reason - PH

Classical and contemporary views of traditional issues regarding the nature and rationality of religious belief, with a focus on monotheistic religions and a unit on religious pluralism. Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or religion. (4)

PHIL 353: Topics in Philosophy - PH

Study of selected topics in philosophy, such as value theory, science, metaphysics, epistemology, feminism, film or health care. May be repeated for credit. (2 to 4)

PHIL 387: Special Topics in Philosophy

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHIL 388: Special Topics in Philosophy

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHIL 389: Special Topics in Philosophy

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHIL 487: Special Topics in Philosophy

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHIL 488: Special Topics in Philosophy

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHIL 489: Special Topics in Philosophy

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHIL 491: Independent Reading and Research

Prerequisite: Departmental consent. (1 to 4)

PHIL 493: Honors Research Project

The writing of an honors thesis and final completion of the reading program in primary sources required for the honors major. Presentation of thesis to department majors and faculty. (4)

PHIL 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

PHIL 499: Capstone: Advanced Seminar in Philosophy - SR

Exploration in a seminar format of an important philosophical issue, thinker, or movement. Topic to be announced at the time course is offered. Prerequisite: Three philosophy courses or consent of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. (4)

PHYS 110: Astronomy - NS, SM

Stars and their evolution, galaxies and larger structures, cosmology, and the solar system. Emphasis on observational evidence. Evening observing sessions. Prerequisite: MATH 115 or equivalent by math placement exam. (4)

PHYS 125: College Physics I - NS, SM

An introduction to the fundamental topics of physics. It is a non-calculus sequence, involving only the use of trigonometry and college algebra. Concurrent registration in (or previous completion of) PHYS 135 is required. Prerequisites: MATH 128 or MATH 140 (or equivalent by placement exam) with a C- or higher. (4)

PHYS 126: College Physics II - NS, SM

An introduction to fundamental topics of physics. It is a non-calculus sequence, involving only the use of trigonometry and college algebra. Concurrent registration in (or previous completion of) PHYS 136 is required. Prerequisite: PHYS 125 with a C-or higher. (4)

PHYS 135: College Physics I Laboratory

Basic laboratory experiments are performed in conjunction with the College Physics sequence. Concurrent registration in PHYS 125 is required. (1)

PHYS 136: College Physics II Laboratory

Basic laboratory experiments are performed in conjunction with the College Physics sequence. Concurrent registration in PHYS 126 is required. (1)

PHYS 153: General Physics I - NS, SM

A calculus-level survey of the general fields of physics, including classical mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics. Concurrent registration in (or previous completion of) PHYS 163 is required. Concurrent registration in (or previous completion of) MATH 152 is strongly recommended. Prerequisite: MATH 151 with a C- or higher. (4)

PHYS 154: General Physics II - NS, SM

A calculus-level survey of the general fields of physics, including electricity and magnetism, and optics. Concurrent registration in (or previous completion of) PHYS 164 is required. Prerequisites: MATH 152, PHYS 153 with a C- or higher. (4)

PHYS 163: General Physics I Laboratory

Basic laboratory experiments are performed in conjunction with the General Physics sequence. Concurrent registration in PHYS 153 is required. (1)

PHYS 164: General Physics II Laboratory

Basic laboratory experiments are performed in conjunction with the General Physics sequence. Concurrent registration in PHYS 154 is required. (1)

PHYS 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

PHYS 210: Musical Acoustics - NS, SM

A study of sound and music using physical methods; vibrating systems; simple harmonic motion; wave motion; complex waves and Fourier synthesis; wave generation in musical instruments; physiology of hearing; architectural acoustics; electronic recording and amplification. Includes weekly laboratory. No prerequisites in physics or mathematics beyond the PLU entrance requirements are assumed. (4)

PHYS 221: Waves and Fluids

A systematic introduction to waves and fluids under the unifying theme of physics of continuous systems. The course covers harmonic oscillations and waves in their most common physical realizations: mechanical, electromagnetic, and quantum. It discusses the statics and dynamics of ideal and viscous fluids, and some topics from nonlinear dynamics. Prerequisites: PHYS 153, 154 (or permission of instructor), MATH 151, 152. Co-requisite: MATH 253.

PHYS 223: Elementary Modern Physics

A selected treatment of various physical phenomena that are inadequately described by classical methods of physics. Interpretations that have been developed for these phenomena since approximately 1900 are presented at an elementary level. Prerequisites: PHYS 154 and MATH 253. (4)

PHYS 240: Engineering Statics

Engineering statics using vector algebra; equilibrium of rigid bodies; equivalent force and movement systems; centroids and center of gravity; trusses and frames; methods of virtual work; shear and bending moment diagrams; moments of inertia. Prerequisite: PHYS 153. (4)

PHYS 287: Special Topics in Physics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHYS 288: Special Topics in Physics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHYS 289: Special Topics in Physics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHYS 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

PHYS 331: Electromagnetic Theory

Electrostatics, dipole fields, fields in dielectric materials, electromagnetic induction, and magnetic properties of matter, in conjunction with the development of Maxwell's equations. Prerequisites: PHYS 153, 154 and MATH 253. (4)

PHYS 332: Electromagnetic Waves and Physical Optics

Proceeding from Maxwell's equations, the generation and propagation of electromagnetic waves is developed with particular emphasis on their application to physical optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 331 with a c- or higher. (4)

PHYS 333: Engineering Thermodynamics

Classical, macroscopic thermodynamics with applications to physics, engineering, and chemistry. Thermodynamic state variables, cycles, and potentials; flow and non-flow systems; pure substances, mixtures, and solutions; phase transitions; introduction to statistical thermodynamics. Prerequisites: PHYS 153 and MATH 253. (4)

PHYS 334: Engineering Materials Science

Fundamentals of engineering materials including mechanical, chemical, thermal, and electrical properties associated with metals, polymers, composites, and alloys. Focus on how useful material properties can be engineered through control of microstructure. Prerequisites: PHYS 154, CHEM 115. (4)

PHYS 336: Classical Mechanics

Applications of differential equations to particle dynamics; rigid body dynamics; including the inertia tensor and Euler's equations; calculus of variations; Lagrange's equations and the Hamiltonian formulation of mechanics; symmetries and conservation laws. Prerequisities: PHYS 154 and MATH 253. (4)

PHYS 354: Mathematical Physics I

Ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms, functions of a complex variable, and contour integration are developed in the context of examples from the fields of electromagnetism, waves, transport, vibrations, and mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 154 and MATH 253, or MATH 253 and enrollment in PHYS 154, or permission of the instructor. (4)

PHYS 356: Mathematical Physics II

Fourier analysis, boundary-value problems, special functions, and eigenvalue problems are developed and illustrated through applications in physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 354. (4)

PHYS 387: Special Topics in Physics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHYS 388: Special Topics in Physics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHYS 389: Special Topics in Physics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHYS 401: Introduction to Quantum Mechanics

The ideas and techniques of quantum mechanics are developed. Prerequisites: PHYS 223 and 356, or permission of the instructor. (4)

PHYS 487: Special Topics in Physics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHYS 488: Special Topics in Physics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHYS 489: Special Topics in Physics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PHYS 491: Independent Studies

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

PHYS 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

PHYS 499A: Capstone: Advanced Lab - SR

Selected experiments from both classical and modern physics are performed using state of the art instrumentation. With 499B meets the senior seminar/project requirement. Prerequisites: PHYS 223; two upper-division courses in physics, one of which may be taken concurrently with 499A. (1)

PHYS 499B: Capstone: Advanced Lab II - SR

Continuation of PHYS 499A with emphasis on design and implementation of a project under the guidance of the physics staff. With PHYS 499A meets the senior seminar/project requirement. Prerequisite: PHYS 499A. (1)

POLS 101: Introduction to Politics - SO

A general introduction to political issues, ideals and processes using case studies (4)

POLS 151: American Government - SO

A survey of the constitutional foundations of the American political system and of institutions, processes, and practices relating to participation, decision-making, and public policy in American national government. (4)

POLS 170: Introduction to Legal Studies - SO

An examination of the nature of law, judicial process, and participant roles in the legal system. (4)

POLS 210: Global Perspectives: The World in Change - C, SO

A survey of global issues: modernization and development; economic change and international trade; diminishing resources; war and resolution; peace and justice; and cultural diversity. (Although this course is cross-listed with ANTH/HIST 210, students receive political science credit only when this course has a faculty member from political science.) (4)

POLS 231: Current International Issues - SO

A survey course in international relations with emphasis on current events. (4)

POLS 287: Special Topics in Political Science

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

POLS 288: Special Topics in Political Science

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

POLS 289: Special Topics in Political Science

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

POLS 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

POLS 301: Political Science Methods

How does political science approach analysis of the political world? This course covers the approaches borrowed and developed by the discipline, research design, and qualitative methods to conduct research. Upon completion, students should be able to critique, understand, and conduct research about politics. (4)

POLS 322: Scandinavia and World Issues - SO

This course explores globalization, de-centering of power, the declining sovereignty of nation-states, and the interaction of economic, political, and cultural factors in the global production of social life. Key topics include migration, sustainability, and international conflict as they related to Scandinavian societies, institutions, and states. Cross-listed with SCAN 322. (4)

POLS 325: Political Thought - SO

A survey of the origin and evolution of major political concepts in ancient, medieval, and early modern times. Can count for a Philosophy major or minor. (4)

POLS 326: Recent Political Thought - SO

A critical examination of the major ideologies of the modern world. (4)

POLS 331: International Relations - SO

A systematic analysis of the international system highlighting patterns in state interaction. Intensive writing course. (4)

POLS 332: International Conflict Resolution - SO

This course will study several examples of peace processes and compare them with conflict reduction/resolution models. At any given time in recent years, over thirty violent conflicts, most of them internal but some also external, tear apart societies, produce extensive suffering, and threaten regional stability. Several strategies have been tried, some relatively successfully, to end such violence and begin the long, difficult process of achieving peace. Intensive writing course. Prerequisite: Any political science course, but particularly recommended are POLS 101, 210, and 331. (4)

POLS 338: American Foreign Policy - SO

The role of the United States in international affairs. An analysis of the major factors in the formulation and execution of the United States foreign policy and its impact on other powers. (4)

POLS 345: Government and Public Policy - SO

An integrated approach to the nature of public policy, with emphasis on substantive problems, the development of policy responses by political institutions, and the impacts of policies. Intensive writing course. (4)

POLS 346: Environmental Politics and Policy - SO

An examination of environmental problems from political perspectives, including international and domestic political contexts and methods of evaluating policies. (4)

POLS 347: Political Economy - SO

An examination of the ways that politics and economics coincide. Topics include the development of capitalism, socialist approaches, international issues, regional examples, and methods of study. Prerequisites: POLS 101; ECON 101 or 102 or ECON 111. (4)

POLS 353: US Citizenship and Ethnic Relations - A, SO

This course will focus on the political incorporation in the United States polity of a variety of ethnic communities by studying the evolution of US citizenship policy. Intensive writing course. (4)

POLS 354: State and Local Government - SO

Governmental structures, processes, and policy at state, local, and regional levels of the American system. (4)

POLS 361: Political Parties and Elections - SO

Study of party and electoral systems with particular emphasis on American parties and elections. Examination of party roles in elections and government; party financing; interest groups and political action committees; and voting behavior. Intensive writing course. (4)

POLS 363: Politics and the Media - SO

The role of mass media in American government, politics, and policy. Attention to political culture, public opinion, polls and surveys, press freedom and responsibility, and governmental regulation, secrecy, and manipulation. (4)

POLS 364: The Legislative Process - SO

A study of theory, organization, and procedure of the Congress and other legislative bodies in the United States. (4)

POLS 371: Judicial Process - SO

An examination of legal processes in various adjudicatory settings. Primary attention given to judicial processes focusing on American civil and criminal law. (4)

POLS 372: Constitutional Law - SO

The constitutional basis of governmental powers in the United States with special emphasis given to judicial review, separation of powers, federalism, interstate commerce, and political and constitutional restrictions on governmental power. Intensive writing course. (4)

POLS 373: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties - SO

The constitutional basis of rights and liberties in the United States with special emphasis given to freedom of expression and association, religious freedom, rights in criminal proceedings, due process, and equal protection. Intensive writing course. (4)

POLS 374: Legal Studies Research - SO

Introduction to various methods of legal analysis, research, and writing. (4)

POLS 380: Politics of Global Development - SO

Designed to provide information, concepts, and alternative perspectives needed to study development as a global issue within the international political context. Examples of how general world trends manifest themselves in specific countries will be covered as well as case studies of successful development projects. Intensive writing course. Prerequisite: Any political science course, but particularly recommended are POLS 101, 210, and 331. (4)

POLS 383: Modern European Politics - SO

A study of the origins and development of the European Union and an examination of the governmental systems and political cultures of key European states, including France, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom. (4)

POLS 384: Scandinavian Government and Politics - SO

This course examines the governmental structures and political processes of the Scandinavian countries. It does so in the context of the region’s historical development, its political cultures and ideologies, the distinctive Scandinavian model of political economy and welfare, and the place of Scandinavia in the international system. (4)

POLS 385: Canadian Government and Politics - SO

The governmental system and political life of Canada, with special attention to the constitution, political parties, nationalism and separatism in Quebec, self-government of native peoples, and comparative study of Canadian and U.S. political cultures. Intensive writing course. (4)

POLS 386: The Middle East - C, SO

Contrasts the history and aspirations of the Arab Nations with the reality of European dominance and its legacy, the formation of the present Arab states and Israel. Intensive writing course. (4)

POLS 387: Special Topics in Political Science

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

POLS 388: Special Topics in Political Science

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

POLS 389: Special Topics in Political Science

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

POLS 401: Workshops and Special Topics - SO

(1 to 4)

POLS 431: Advanced International Relations - SO

Examines various theories of international conflict management, including in-depth analysis of historical examples. The development of international law and international governmental organizations are also considered. Prerequisite: POLS 331. (4)

POLS 450: Internship in Politics

Internship in the political dimensions of non-governmental organizations. By departmental consent only. (1 to 8)

POLS 455: Internship in International and Comparative Politics

Internship overseas or with a US agency or organization that engages in international issues and activities. By departmental consent only. (1 to 8)

POLS 458: Internship in Public Administration

An internship with a government department or agency. By departmental consent only. (1 to 8)

POLS 464: Internship in the Legislative Process

An opportunity to study the process from the inside by working directly with legislative participants at the national, state or local level. By department consent only. (Internships with the Washington State Legislature are open only to juniors and seniors with at least one year at PLU.) (1 to 12)

POLS 471: Internships in Legal Studies

An internship with a private or public sector agency or office engaged in legal research, litigation, or law enforcement. By departmental consent only. (4)

POLS 487: Special Topics in Political Science

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

POLS 488: Special Topics in Political Science

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

POLS 489: Special Topics in Political Science

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

POLS 491: Independent Studies

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. By department consent only. (1 to 4)

POLS 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

POLS 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR

Intensive study into topics, concepts, issues, and methods of inquiry in political science. Emphasis on student research, writing, and presentation. By departmental consent only. Prerequisite: POLS 301. (4)

PSYC 101: Introduction to Psychology - SO

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Topics include learning, memory, perception, thinking, development, emotion, personality, mental illness, and social behavior. (4)

PSYC 110: Study Skills

Effective techniques for college study. Note-making, study methods, examination skills, time management, educational planning. Class work supplemented by individual counseling. Does not meet general university requirments or psychology major or minor requirements. (1)

PSYC 113: Career and Educational Planning: Finding Your Way

Personal decision-making process applied to career and educational choices, self-assessment, exploration of the world of work, educational planning, reality testing, and building career-related experience. Includes zero-hour required discussion section for required supplemental workshops. Does not meet general educational elements or psychology major or minor requirements. (1)

PSYC 213: Transitions: Life After College

This is a course designed for juniors and seniors. Students will explore life and work after college, specifically career opportunities, graduate school options, cover letters, résumé writing, interviews, and job search techniques. This course does not meet general university requirements or psychology major or minor requirements. (1)

PSYC 242: Advanced Statistics and Research Design

A continuation of Statistics 232 and accompanying lab taught by members of the psychology department. Topics include single- and multi-factor experimental designs and analyses of variance, multiple regression, quasi-experiments, surveys, and non-parametric statistical techniques. Students will learn to use computer programs to carry out statistical analyses and will have the opportunity to design and conduct their own research study. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: STAT 232 and accompanying lab taught by members of the psychology department. (4)

PSYC 287: Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 288: Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 289: Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

PSYC 310: Personality Theories

Strategies for the study of personality. Review of theories and research. Discussion of implications for counseling. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 320: Development Across the Lifespan

Biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development from conception through adulthood to death. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 330: Social Psychology

The study of how an individual's thoughts and behaviors are influenced by the presence of others. Research and theory concerning topics such as person perception, attitudes, group processes, prejudice, aggression and helping behaviors are discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 335: Cultural Psychology

The study of the relation between culture and human behavior. Topics include cognition, language, intelligence, emotion, development, social behavior, and mental health. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 345: Community Psychology

Intervention strategies that focus primarily on communities and social systems. Particular stress on alternatives to traditional clinical styles for promoting the well-being of communities and groups. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 360: Psychology of Language

The study of language as a means of communication and structured human behavior. Topics include: biological foundations of language, psycholinguistics, speech perception and production, sentence and discourse comprehension, nonverbal communication, language acquisition, bilingualism, language disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 370: Gender and Sexuality

Study of the social, biological and cultural factors that contribute to human sexuality and gender-related behavior. Topics include sexual identity, typical and atypical sexual behavior, reproduction, communication, intimate relationships, masculinity and femininity. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 375: Psychology of Women - A

Exploration of psychological issues pertinent to women. Includes such topics as sex differences; psychological ramifications of menarche, child bearing, menopause, sexual harassment, and rape; women's experiences with work and achievement, love and sexuality, and psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 380: Psychology of Work

Integrating career planning into the study of human behavior in work settings. Application and extension of psychological principles to the individual operating within an organization context - including measuring and facilitating job performance, worker motivation, human factors, and group processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 385: Consumer Psychology

Social psychological principles applied to consumer attitude-formation and decision-making - e.g., perception of advertisements, influence of reference groups and opinion leaders, and learning effects upon repeat purchasing. Emphasis on audience, message, and media factors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 387: Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 388: Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 389: Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 405: Workshop on Alternative Perspectives - A

Selected topics in psychology as announced which help fulfill the university requirement in alternative perspectives. (1 to 4)

PSYC 410: Psychological Testing

Survey of standardized tests; methods of development, standardization, limitations and interpretations of tests. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, STAT 232 or consent of instructor. (4)

PSYC 415: Abnormal Psychology

Models of psychopathology. Diagnosis and treatment of abnormal behaviors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101; STAT 232 or consent of instructor. (4)

PSYC 420: Adolescent Psychology

Physical development, mental traits, social characteristics, and interests of adolescents; adjustments in home, school, and community. Prerequisite: PSYC 320. (4)

PSYC 430: Peace Psychology

Theories and practices for development of sustainable societies through the prevention of destructive conflict and violence. Focus upon nonviolent management of conflict and pursuit of social justice by empowering individuals and building cultures of peace. Prerequisite: PSYC 330 or consent of instructor. (4)

PSYC 435: Theories and Methods of Counseling and Psychotherapy

Introduction to basic methods of counseling and psychotherapy, and examination of the theories from which these methods derive. Prerequisites: PSYC 310, 345, 410, or PSYC 415; or consent of instructor. (4)

PSYC 440: Human Neuropsychology

Study of the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological mechanisms of behavior and mental function. Topics include perception, voluntary action, spatial processing, language, memory, emotion, social behavior, and consciousness Prerequisite: PSYC 101, 242. (4)

PSYC 441: Experimental Research Laboratory in Neuropsychology

Experiments and demonstrations related to neuropsychological phenomena. Emphasis on methodology in research on the brain and behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 440 or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 440. (2)

PSYC 442: Learning: Research and Theory

A critical overview of the research data on human and animal learning, and of the theoretical attempts to understand those data. Prerequisite: PSYC 101, 242. (4)

PSYC 443: Experimental Research Laboratory in Learning

Experiments and demonstrations related to conditioning and learning in humans and animals. Emphasis on methodology in learning research. Prerequisite: PSYC 442 or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 442. (2)

PSYC 446: Perception

The study of our interactions with the physical world and the nature of our understanding of it. Includes such topics as color vision, dark adaptation, hearing music and speech, taste, smell, pain, and sensory physiology. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, 242. (4)

PSYC 447: Experimental Research Laboratory in Perception

Experiments and demonstrations of perceptual events. Emphasis on methodology in perception research. Prerequisite: PSYC 446 or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 446. (2)

PSYC 448: Cognitive Psychology

The study of human thought. Topics include attention, perception, memory, knowledge and concept formation, language, problem-solving, and reasoning. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, 242. (4)

PSYC 449: Experimental Research laboratory in Cognition

Experiments and demonstrations related to human cognition. Emphasis on methodology in research on cognition. Prerequisite: PSYC 448 or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 448. (2)

PSYC 483: Seminar

Selected topics in psychology as announced. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (2 to 4)

PSYC 487: Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 488: Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 489: Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 491: Independent Study

A supervised reading, field, or research project of special interest for advanced undergraduate students. Prerequisite: Consent of supervising faculty. (1 to 4)

PSYC 495: Internship

A practicum experience in the community in the clinical, social, and/or experimental areas. Classroom focus on case conceptualization and presentation. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing plus one course in psychology and consent of the department. (1 to 6)

PSYC 496: Research Practicum

Research experience under the direct supervision of a faculty member, students may design and/or conduct research in a designated area of psychology. May be repeated for up to 8 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or consent of instructor. (1 to 4)

PSYC 497: Teaching Apprenticeship

Teaching experience under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Course provides the opportunity to learn how to effectively communicate information, understand classroom management, and develop teaching skills. Students will serve as a teaching assistant for a psychology course. Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in class you will be a TA for, a minimum 3.0 overall G.P.A., junior standing at time the course is offered, consent of instructor. May be repeated for up to 4 credits. (1 to 4)

PSYC 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR

Required for Psychology majors. Students will complete and present at an on-campus Psychology Research Conference held fall and spring terms. Students earning the B.S. degree must conduct empirical research projects whereas as students earning the B.A. degree may choose nonempirical projects. The projects may emerge from ideas and experiences in an upper-division psychology course, advanced research activity, or in response to an internship completed by the student. Prerequisites: PSYC 242, senior standing, and permission of instructor. (4)

RELI 121: The Christian Tradition - RC

The study of selected theological questions and formulations examined in their social and historical contexts. (4)

RELI 131: The Religions of South Asia - C, RG

Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism - their origins and development, expansion, and contemporary issues. (4)

RELI 132: The Religions of East Asia - C, RG

Confucianism, Taoism, Chinese and Japanese Buddhism, Shinto, and the "new religions" of Japan -- their origins, development, and contemporary issues. (4)

RELI 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

RELI 211: Religion and Literature of the Hebrew Bible - RG

The literary, historical, and theological dimensions of the Hebrew Bible, including perspectives on contemporary issues. These writings later formed the Jewish Scriptures and the Christian Old Testament. (4)

RELI 212: Religion and Literature of the New Testament - RC

The literary, historical, and theological dimensions of the New Testament, including perspectives on contemporary issues. (4)

RELI 213: Topics in Biblical Studies - RG

The study of selected biblical questions or themes examined in their social and historical contexts. Fulfills Global Religious Traditions. (4)

RELI 214: Topics in Biblical Studies - RC

The study of selected biblical quesitons or themes examined in their social and historical contexts. Fulfills Christians Traditions. (4)

RELI 220: Early Christianity - RC

The origins, thought and expansion of the Christian Church; the growth of Christian involvement in culture to the end of the papacy of Gregory I (604 CE). (4)

RELI 221: Medieval Christianity - RC

A study of the ideas, practices, forms of community among Christians from 600-1350, with an emphasis on how they understood their relationship to God, each other, and the natural world. (4)

RELI 222: Modern Church History - RC

Beginning with the Peace of Westphalia (1648), interaction of the Christian faith with modern politics, science, and philosophy; expansion in the world, modern movements. (4)

RELI 223: American Church History - RC

Interaction of religious and social forces in American history, especially their impact on religious communities. (4)

RELI 224: The Lutheran Heritage - RC

Lutheranism as a movement within the church catholic: its history, doctrine, and worship in the context of today's pluralistic and secular world. (4)

RELI 225: Faith and Spirituality - RC

Reflection on Christian lifestyles, beliefs, and commitments. (4)

RELI 226: Christian Ethics - RC

Introduction to the personal and social ethical dimensions of Christian life and thought with attention to primary theological positions and specific problem areas. (4)

RELI 227: Christian Theology - RC

Survey of selected topics or movements in Christian theology designed to introduce the themes and methodologies of the discipline. RELI 247 for cross-cultural GenEd and RELI 257 for alternative perspective GenEd. (4)

RELI 230: Religion and Culture - A, RG

Explores the interrelation and interaction of religion and culture in a variety of world religious traditions. Incorporates recognized methodologies in academic religious studies. (4)

RELI 231: Myth, Ritual, and Symbol - RG

The nature of myth and its expression through symbol and ritual. (4)

RELI 232: The Buddhist Tradition - C, RG

Introduction to the history and practice of Buddhist tradition in its South Asian, East Asian, and Western cultural contexts. (4)

RELI 233: The Religions of China - C, RG

Introduction to the major religious movements of China. (4)

RELI 235: Islamic Traditions - C, RG

An introduction to the history, teachings, and practices of Islam. (4)

RELI 236: Native American Religious Traditions - A, RG

Introduction to a variety of Native American religious traditions, emphasizing the way in which religion works to construct identity, promote individual collective well being, and acts as a means of responding to colonialism. Approaches the topic using academic religious studies' methodologies. (4)

RELI 237: Judaism - C, RG

Historical development of Judaism's faith and commitment from early Biblical times to the present. (4)

RELI 238: The Religions of Korea and Japan - C, RG

Introduction to the major religious traditions of Korea and Japan. (4)

RELI 239: Environment and Culture - RG

Study of the ways in which environmental issues are shaped by human culture and values. Major conceptions of nature, including non-western perspectives and issues in eco-justice. Critical evaluations of literature, arts, ethics, conceptual frameworks, history, and spirituality. Cross-listed with ENGL 239. (4)

RELI 246: Religion and Diversity - C, RG

Course offers comparative introduction to multiple religious traditions and investigates the commonalities and distinctions between their views of the world and teachings about how human beings are to act within the world. Students will gain a basic familiarity with diverse religions and will develop their own constructive response to variety of religious and cultural traditions. (4)

RELI 301: Research in Religion

Introduces majors to the scholarly questions, literature, bibliographical assessment, forms of scholarly criticism in the field, and the necessary elements in the creation of a research paper in the field. Topic and content to be determined by the instructor. Required for majors. (4)

RELI 330: Old Testament Studies - RG

Major areas of inquiry: the prophets, psalms, wisdom literature, mythology, theology, or biblical archeology. (4)

RELI 331: New Testament Studies - RC

Major areas of inquiry: intertestamental, synoptic, Johannine, or Pauline literature, or New Testament theology. (4)

RELI 332: Jesus and His Early Interpreters - RC

Historical survey of "Life of Jesus" research; form and redaction criticism of the gospel tradition; the religious dimensions of Jesus' life and thought. Prerequisite: One lower-division RELI course or consent of instructor. (4)

RELI 347: Major Religious Thinkers, Texts and Genres - C, RC or RG

In-depth study of major figures, texts, or genres in Christian and non-Christian religious traditions, focusing especially on the theology and religious thought of these traditions. Fulfills either line 2 or 3 as appropriate. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (4)

RELI 357: Major Religious Thinkers, Texts and Genres - A, RC or RG

In-depth study of major figures, texts, or genres in Christian and non-Christian religious traditions, focusing especially on the theology and religious thought of these traditions. Fulfills either line 2 or 3 as appropriate. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (4)

RELI 361: Church History Studies - RC

Selected area of inquiry, such as Orthodox church history, religious experience among American minority communities, and the ecumenical movement. RELI 341 for cross cultural GenEd and RELI 351 for alternative perspective GenEd. (4)

RELI 362: Luther - RC

The man and his times, with major emphasis on his writing and creative theology. (4)

RELI 364: Theological Studies - RC

Selected topic or movement within Christian theology. RELI 344 for cross cultural GenEd and RELI 354 for alternative perspective GenEd. (4)

RELI 365: Christian Moral Issues - RC

In-depth exploration from the perspective of Christian ethics of selected moral issues such as peace and violence, the environment, sexuality, political and economic systems, hunger, and poverty. (4)

RELI 367: Major Religious Thinkers, Texts and Genres - RC or RG

In-depth study of major figures, texts, or genres in Christian and non-Christian religious traditions, focusing especially on the theology and religious thought of these traditions. Fulfills either RC or RG as appropriate. RELI 347 for cross-cultural GenEd and RELI 357 for alternative GenEd. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (4)

RELI 368: Feminist and Womanist Theologies - A, RC

A study of major theological themes and issues through global women's perspectives on gender. (4)

RELI 390: Topics in Comparative Religions - C, RG

Historical study of specific non-Christian religions such as the traditions of India and China, Judaism, and Islam. RELI 393 is for alternative perspective general education element. (4)

RELI 391: Sociology of Religion - RG

Multi-cultural investigation of religious experience, belief, and ritual in relation to their social settings with particular attention to new forms of religion in America. Cross-listed with SOCI 391. (4)

RELI 392: God, Magic, and Morals - C, RG

Anthropology of religion. Cross-listed with ANTH 392. (4)

RELI 393: Topics in Comparative Religions - A, RG

Historical study of specific non-Christian religions such as the traditions of India and China, Judaism, and Islam. RELI 390 is for cross-cultural general education element. (4)

RELI 491: Independent Study

For religion majors only and consent of the department is required. (1 to 4)

RELI 499: Capstone: Research Seminar - SR

Discussion of common readings and a major research and writing project with public presentation around the student's area of interest. (4)

SCAN 150: Scandinavian Cultures and Societies

Introduction to studying and understanding the cultures and societies of the Nordic region (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, Åland, the Faroe Islands, and Greenland. In addition to brief geographic and historical overviews, the course uses film, literature and art to investigate the contemporary societies from such perspectives as identity construction, the environment, international peace-building efforts, and the Sámi, and minority populations. Taught in English. (4)

SCAN 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

SCAN 227: The Vikings - SO

This course examines Old Norse culture and history during the Viking period (approximately 750-1100), focusing on Viking expansion and interactions with external European, Asian and American societies, conversion to Christianity and the emergence of medieval kingdoms, and on how our historical understanding of the Vikings is produced. Cross-listed with HIST 227. (4)

SCAN 241: Scandinavian Folklore - LT

Through reading of myths, folktales, ballads and legends, the course critiques the role of folk narrative as an expression of belief, identity and world view in traditional and contemporary Scandinavian societies. Examples of folk culture in music, art and film supplement the readings. Course conducted in English. (4)

SCAN 286: Sámi Culture in Global Indigenous Contexts - A, C

Through a variety of media students will be introduced to the Indigenous Sámi of northern Scandinavia and Russia, and will develop an understanding of Sámi culture, history, and worldviews, as well as of contemporary issues concerning the Sámi and other Indigenous peoples, including peoples in the United States. In English. (4)

SCAN 287: Special Topics in Scandinavian Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SCAN 288: Special Topics in Scandinavian Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SCAN 289: Special Topics in Scandinavian Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SCAN 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

SCAN 321: Topics in Scandinavian Culture and Society

This course concentrates on special topics such as Nordic colonialism, urban and rural space, the role of migrations in a changing society, and construction of national identity. Course taught in English, and may be repeated for credit for different topic areas. If topic is "Sámi Life and Culture", receives cross-cultural GenEd element. (4)

SCAN 322: Scandinavia and World Issues - SO

This course explores globalization, de-centering of power, the declining sovereignty of nation-states, and the interaction of economic, political, and cultural factors in the global production of social life. Key topics include migration, sustainability, and international conflict as they related to Scandinavian societies, institutions, and states. Cross-listed with POLS 322. (4)

SCAN 341: Topics in Scandinavian Literature - LT

Selected literary works provide an in-depth study on specific topics critical to our study of Scandinavian cultures and societies in the global community, including conflict and peace, immigrants' stories, and the outsider in Scandinavian literature and film. Course taught in English and open to non-majors. Course may be repeated for credit for different topic areas. When topic is "Scandinavian Migrant Literatures" receives Alternative Perspective (A) GenEd. (4)

SCAN 387: Special Topics in Scandinavian Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SCAN 388: Special Topics in Scandinavian Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SCAN 389: Special Topics in Scandinavian Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SCAN 422: Modernity and Its Discontents - LT

This course examines literary responses to modernity from the nineteeth century to today, including such movements as Romanticism, the Modern Breakthrough, Modernism and Postmodernism. Readings include drama, novels, short stories, poetry, and criticism. Course is conducted in English; readings are in translation for non-majors. (4)

SCAN 487: Special Topics in Scandinavian Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SCAN 488: Special Topics in Scandinavian Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SCAN 489: Special Topics in Scandinavian Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SCAN 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

SCAN 495: Internships - SR

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (2 or 4)

SCAN 499: Capstone: Senior Project - SR

Research paper, internship or other approved project. Open only to Scandinavian Area Studies majors. (4)

SIGN 101: Sign Language - A

An introduction to the structure of American Sign Language and to the world of the hearing impaired. Basic signing skills and sign language vocabulary; finger spelling; the particular needs and problems of deaf people. (4)

SIGN 102: Sign Language - A

An introduction to the structure of American Sign Language and to the world of the hearing impaired. Basic signing skills and sign language vocabulary; finger spelling; the particular needs and problems of deaf people. (4)

SIGN 287: Special Topics in Sign Language

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SIGN 288: Special Topics in Sign Language

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SIGN 289: Special Topics in Sign Language

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SIGN 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

SIGN 387: Special Topics in Sign Language

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SIGN 388: Special Topics in Sign Language

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SIGN 389: Special Topics in Sign Language

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SIGN 487: Special Topics in Sign Language

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SIGN 488: Special Topics in Sign Language

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SIGN 489: Special Topics in Sign Language

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology - A, SO

An introduction to the discipline of sociology. Features an analysis of contemporary American society with emphasis on the interconnections of race, class, and gender. Sociological concepts include socialization, social roles, stereotypes, power, and stratification. (4)

SOCI 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

SOCI 226: Delinquency and Juvenile Justice

An examination of juvenile delinquency in relation to the family, peer groups, community and institutional structure. Includes consideration of processing the juvenile delinquent by formal agencies of control. (4)

SOCI 232: Research Methods - SO

An overview of the methods to explore, describe, and analyze the social world. General issues in the design and implementation of research projects, as well as specific issues that arise in conducting interviews and field observations, constructing and administering surveys, analyzing existing data, and planning program evaluations. Required for sociology and social work majors. Prerequisite: SOCI 101. Instructor consent is required. (4)

SOCI 240: Social Problems - A, SO

Critical examination of poverty, discrimination, drugs, crime, homelessness, violence, and family breakdown. Course addresses contemporary social problems, an analysis of their social roots, and an evaluation of the policies designed to eradicate them. (4)

SOCI 287: Special Topics in Sociology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCI 288: Special Topics in Sociology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCI 289: Special Topics in Sociology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCI 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

SOCI 296: Social Stratification - A, SO

An examination of the cultural and structural causes of social stratification and its consequence, social inequality. The course focuses on stratification and inequality on the basis of race, class, and gender, exploring what social forces shape individuals' differentiated access to society's valued resources. (4)

SOCI 330: The Family

An examination of the institution of the family from historical, multi-cultural, and contemporary perspectives, with emphasis on how families and family life are affected by social forces such as the economy, race and ethnicity, religion, and law. Topics include: relationships, love, authority, conflict, sexuality, gender issues, child rearing, communication patterns, and violence in the context of family life. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or consent of instructor. (4)

SOCI 332: Race and Ethnicity - A, SO

A critical examination of racial/ethnic structures and inequalities in the United States. The course will explore the social construction of race and ethnicity, the development of racial and ethnic identities, and how race and ethnic inequalities shape social institutions, such as the economy, families, education, and politics. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 or consent of instructor. (4)

SOCI 336: Deviance

A general introduction to a variety of nonconforming, usually secretive, and illegal behavior, such as corporate crime, drug dealing, prostitution, industrial spying, child abuse, and suicide, with emphasis on the conflict of values and life-experiences within a society. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or consent of instructor. (4)

SOCI 378: Consumption

An examination of the relationship between goods, individuals, and society. The course deconstructs the social bases of consumption to better understand the role consumption plays in shaping our identities and maintaining social distinctions. The course also addresses the relationship between consumption and social problems like consumer debt, inequality, and sustainability. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or consent of instructor. (4)

SOCI 384: Sociology of Corrections

An examination of the American Correctional System. This course will address historical and contemporary issues in corrections, along with attention to race, class and gender inequalities. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or consent of instructor. (4)

SOCI 387: Special Topics in Sociology - SO

Selected topics as announced by the department. Prerequisite: departmental consent. (1 to 4)

SOCI 388: Special Topics in Sociology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCI 389: Special Topics in Sociology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCI 391: Sociology of Religion - SO

An investigation of the American religious scene with particular emphasis on the new religious movements, along with attention to social settings and processes which these new religions reflect and produce. Prerequisite: SOCI 101, one religion course, or consent of instructor. Cross-listed with RELI 391. (4)

SOCI 394: Gender and Violence

An examination of gendered violence in American society. Focal topics will vary by semester and may include sexual violence, intimate partner violence, stalking, or masculinity and violence. The course will address how violence is gendered, theoretical explanations of gendered violence, and the response of the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 or consent of instructor. (4)

SOCI 413: Crime and Society

An examination of criminal behavior in contemporary society in relation to social structure and the criminalization process with particular attention to the issues of race, gender, and class. Prerequisite: SOCI 101, one additional sociology course, and junior or senior standing; or consent of instructor. (4)

SOCI 440: Gender and Society - A, SO

An examination of gender as a social construction and a system of stratification. Focus is on the structural aspects of gender and upon the intersection of gender with other social categories, such as race, class, and sexuality. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 or WMGS 201, one additional SOCI course, and junior or senior standing; or instructor consent. (4)

SOCI 487: Special Topics in Sociology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCI 488: Special Topics in Sociology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCI 489: Special Topics in Sociology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCI 491: Independent Study

Readings or fieldwork in specific areas or issues of sociology under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: departmental consent. (1 to 4)

SOCI 495: Internship

Students receive course credit for working in community organizations and integrating their experiences into an academic project. Placements are usually arranged by the student and may include the public school system, private and public social service organizations, criminal justice system agencies, local and state governmental agencies, and businesses. departmental consent is required. (1 to 4)

SOCI 496: Major Theories

An analysis of influential sociological theories of the 19th and 20th centuries with attention to the classic theories of Marx, Durkheim, and Weber, to the recent contemporary schools, and to the underlying patterns of thought which both unite and divide the sociological tradition. Required for senior majors. Prerequisites: 16 hours of sociology including SOCI 101 and 232, senior status, declared major or minor. Instructor consent is required. (4)

SOCI 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR

Students design and carry through an independent research project involving the collection of data and the analysis of findings. Students demonstrate their mastery of the field by relating their research to the existing body of sociological literature and knowledge. Required for senior majors. Prerequisites: SOCI 232, 496; STAT 233; senior status; declared major or minor. (4)

SOCW 101: Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare - A, SO

An introduction to human need and the field of social work. Provides an overview of services, models of service delivery, and professional social work values. Students visit agency settings and meet with social work practitioners. A volunteer experience in the field is a required component of this seminar-style course. (4)

SOCW 175: January on the Hill - A, SO

An intense experience of service and community work on Tacoma's Hilltop District and/or Tacoma's eastside where students learn firsthand about poverty and participate in community projects. (4)

SOCW 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

SOCW 245: Human Behavior and the Social Environment - SO

Students examine developmental theory through the lens of an ecological systems perspective and a biopsychosocial-spiritual framework, emphasizing power, privilege, and cultural differences (particularly race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation) as applied to individuals, families, groups, institutions, organizations, and communities locally and globally. Volunteer experience is required. (4)

SOCW 250: Social Policy I: History of Social Welfare - SO

Exploration of power, privilege and oppression emphasizing political process and global social change in the development of the American welfare state and the profession of social work. Students reflect critically upon personal and social values, social welfare systems and their performance, the impact of political ideology and compromise on vulnerable populations, and the function of professional social work. (4)

SOCW 287: Special Topics in Social Work

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCW 288: Special Topics in Social Work

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCW 289: Special Topics in Social Work

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCW 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

SOCW 320: Child Welfare, A Global Perspective

An examination of child welfare, including child abuse and neglect; child welfare services, including CPS, permanency planning, foster care, adoption; and the current status of child well-being around the world, exploring the impact on children of such issues as poverty, war, nutrition, HIV/AIDS, access to education, access to health care, care for orphans, street children. (4)

SOCW 325: Social, Educational, and Health Services in Tobago - C

Explore strengths and needs of Tobago and effects of history and colonialism on the development of community problems. Through service learning, interaction with agency staff and community members, readings and reflections, develop an understanding of the meaning of service in another culture and deepen one's own ethic of meaningful service. (4)

SOCW 329: Compassionate Practice: Spirituality and Contemplation in the Helping Professions

An introduction to spirituality and contemplation designed for students who anticipate their career in the helping professions including, but not limited to, social work, psychology, nursing, sociology, and education. Students will have an opportunity to explore and develop their own spiritualities and also learn to incorporate spirituality and contemplation in their professional client assessment, and personal, professional development. (4)

SOCW 345: Gerontology

Explore the reality of growing order in America and around the world. Learn about adult development, needs and services for older adults, and advocacy with them. Consider providers of services to elderly adults. Ponder how society cares for older people. Calculate the fate of Social Security as baby boomers age. Explore Gerontology as a field of social work practice. Service Learning is a vital component. (4)

SOCW 350: Social Policy II: Social Policy Analysis

Students develop legislative policy practice and advocacy skills, and examine the impact of policy implementation, administration, and governmental structure on services to vulnerable populations. Critical thinking is used to analyze contemporary global and local policy in income assistance, health/mental health, child welfare, homelessness, and services to seniors. Prerequisite: SOCW 250. (4)

SOCW 360: Social Work Practice I: Interviewing and Overview of Generalist Practice

Students learn the conceptual framework of generalist practice and apply the ecological systems perspective to practice. This course introduces engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation in the context of social work both locally and globally. Students are able to learn intentional interviewing skills and apply those skills within various models of practice and across cultures. Prerequisite: SOCW 245. (4)

SOCW 375: Social Services in the Community

Completion of a minimum of 50 hours of work in a community setting. Through written work, students reflect on their experiences, their personal growth, and the mission of the agency. May be repeated for credit up to two semester hours. Prerequisite: SOCW 175 or 245 or 360. (1)

SOCW 387: Special Topics in Social Work

Selected topics as announced by the department. Topics relevant to current trends and issues in the field of social work. (2 to 4)

SOCW 388: Special Topics in Social Work

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCW 389: Special Topics in Social Work

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCW 460: Social Work Practice II: Families and Groups

Grounded in the framework of generalist social work practice, the second social work practice course examines theoretical models and practice skills for assessment and intervention with families and groups. Emphasizes the importance of culturally sensitive practice. Introduces students to group dynamics and group development. Prerequisite: SOCW 245, 360. (4)

SOCW 465: Social Work Practice III: Macropractice

Using the generalist social work practice framework, students develop engagement, assessment, intervention and evaluation skills for local and global practice with organizations, and communities. As professional social workers, students map community assets, examine community development, and advocate for diverse and marginalized groups. Students recognize social service organizations as a changing context for professional practice and research. Prerequisites: SOCW 245, 250, 350, 360, and 460.(4)

SOCW 475: Field Experience I

Students are placed in social service agencies where, under supervision, they demonstrate the generalist skills of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation of practice. They apply ethical principles in interactions with clients and staff, demonstrate critical thinking, engage and embrace diversity, demonstrate and apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment. Pass/Fail. Prerequisites: SOCW 245, 350, and 360; to be taken concurrently with SOCW 460 and 485; requires consent of instructor. (3)

SOCW 476: Field Experience II

Continuation of SOCW 475. Students practice and refine the generalist skills of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation. Through their deepening identification with the social work profession, they analyze how their agency responds to changing contexts and reflect on ways to engage in policy and advocacy practice. Pass/Fail. Must be taken concurrently with SOCW 465 and 486. (3)

SOCW 485: Field Experience Seminar I

Students integrate the theories and skills from their coursework with experiences in their field settings, applying theories of human behavior and the social environment. They write and analyze a case and practice self-reflection by developing a plan to evaluate their own practice. Must be taken concurrently with SOCW 475. (1)

SOCW 486: Field Experience Seminar II

Students continue to grow in their professional identification and behavior. They make a formal case presentation to professional social workers, demonstrating their application of knowledge, values, and skills and their competence in engagement, assessment and intervention. They evaluate their own practice. Must be taken concurrently with SOCW 476. (1)

SOCW 487: Special Topics in Social Welfare

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCW 488: Special Topics in Social Welfare

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCW 489: Special Topics in Social Welfare

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SOCW 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (1 to 4)

SOCW 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

SOCW 498: Capstone Proposal - SR

Students select a topic for their capstone, complete a preliminary literature review, and develop an outline for their final capstone, to be completed in SOCW 499. Prerequisites: SOCW 245, 350, and 360. (1)

SOCW 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR

This integrative seminar requires students to explore a field of generalist practice across all of the competencies of the social work profession, including reciprocal relationships between research and practice, the policies that impact practice, global perspectives, typical ethical issues, role of diversity, evidence-based interventions and ways they may evaluate their practice. This culminates in a paper and public presentation. Prerequisites: SOCW 245, 350, 360, 460, 475, 498, and SOCI 232. (3)

SPED 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

SPED 195: Individuals with Disabilities - A

An introductory course focusing upon persons with disabilities. Overview of legal issues, characteristics, and current issues. Fulfills alternative assessment requirement. (4)

SPED 287: Special Topics in Special Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SPED 288: Special Topics in Special Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SPED 289: Special Topics in Special Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SPED 315: Assessment and Evaluation in Special Education

This course covers critical content in the area of assessment and evaluation of special needs populations. Types of assessments, issues of technical adequacy, and special education law are all covered. (2)

SPED 322: Moderate Disabilities and Transitions

Exploration of issues related to identification of and service delivery to this population. Specialized instruction, management techniques, and issues of transitioning from schools to community. A field experience component will be required. (3)

SPED 399: Practicum in Special Education

Experience with children and youth who have special needs. One hour credit given after successful completion of 45 clock hours and specific course competencies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (1 or 2)

SPED 404: Communication and Collaboration

Focus on knowledge and skills necessary for effective collaboration and supervision with parents, professionals, and paraeducators. (2)

SPED 414: Foundations in Early Childhood Special Education

This course introduces the concepts of how children ages birth through grade three grow, develop and learn; the role of the family in the education of young children; and the importance of providing developmentally age and culturally appropriate learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, emotional and physical development of all young children. The course covers the historical context and rationale for providing educational programs to this age group and includes the laws and policies that currently affect delivery of services. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed course: EDUC 414. (4)

SPED 415: Working with Families of Young Children

This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to engage families and to promote and support a family’s involvement in their child’s educational experiences. Students will learn effective ways to work with families and adults from a variety of cultural/linguistic/socio-economic backgrounds and families of children with special needs to develop appropriate individualized learning plans. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed course: EDUC 415. (3)

SPED 416: Assessment in Early Childhood

In this course, students will learn the many purposes of assessment and become familiar with some of the assessment strategies and tools used most frequently for each purpose. Cross-listed course: EDUC 416. (2)

SPED 419: Child Guidance and Positive Behavior Support

This course is designed to introduce students to theories and skills needed to promote the development of self-regulation, emotional, and social skills in young children and to effectively manage disruptive behaviors in early childhood classroom settings. The course includes strategies for understanding the reasons for challenging behavior, observing and documenting specific behaviors, designing and delivering developmentally appropriate intervention, and advocating for children. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed course: EDUC 419. (3)

SPED 423: Methods of Teaching Students with Mild Disabilities

Focus on instructional strategies and service delivery models effective in teaching students with mild disabilities, included: individualized education programs, curriculum assessment, specially designed instruction and curriculum modification. (4)

SPED 424: Learners with Special Needs in the General Education Classroom

This course focuses on developing teacher candidates' understanding of the perspectives on learning and school and classroom experiences of learners with special needs. Topics include working with other professionals, families and communities, critical inquiry into the differential placement of students, the development of individualized educational plans as a team, and the implementation of these plans. Required of all education majors and taken concurrently with Term II courses: EDUC 424, EDUC 408, and EDUC 412. (4)

SPED 430: Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

In-depth exploration of issues related to the identification of and service delivery to students with emotional and behavioral disabilities. Emphasis on specialized management techniques needed to teach this population. A field experience will be required. (3)

SPED 431: Issues in Autism Spectrum Disorders

This course will provide an overview of Autism Spectrum Disorder for educators as well as other related professionals who may work with or serve children and families with this diagnosis. This course will explore the characteristics of children, youth and adults with autism, evidence-based practices for prevention and intervention, problems and issues in the field, methods of positive behavior support and collaborating with families. Prerequisite: SPED 315 or permission of the instructor. (2)

SPED 442: Technology in Special Education

Current issues and uses of computer technology for learners with special needs. Emphasis on computer assisted instruction, and assistive technology services and devices. (2)

SPED 450: Early Childhood Special Education

Current issues related to young children with special needs. Focus on instructional methods, materials, curriculum, and assessment of this population. (2)

SPED 454: Students with Physical Challenges

Examination of knowledge and skills needed for meeting the psychological, social, and educational needs of individuals who are physically challenged and/or medically fragile. (2)

SPED 458: Student Teaching in Early Childhood Special Education

Teaching in early childhood settings serving children, ages birth to eight, with and without disabilities. Nine weeks. Candidates getting both the ECE/ECSE and special education endorsements will spend part of this time in a special education setting. Concurrent enrollment with EDUC 434 and 450. Cross-listed course: EDUC 458. (3)

SPED 459: Special Teaching in Special Education

Teaching in a K-8 special education setting; 9 weeks. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 434 and EDUC 450. (6)

SPED 460: Special Education Student Teaching Seminar: Issues in Practice

A seminar for special education student teachers focusing on current issues in special education. Taken concurrently with student teaching Term IV Hub and EDUC 450. (1)

SPED 489: Special Topics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SPED 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

SPED 497: Independent Study

Projects of varying length related to trends and issues in special education and approved by an appropriate faculty member and the dean. (1 or 2)

STAT 145: Statistics for Biologists MR, NS

An introduction to statistics with a focus on topics and data relevant to biologists. Descriptive statistics and data representations, correlation and regression, experimental design, basic probability, binomial and normal distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, chi-squared test, ANOVA. Cross-listed with MATH 145. Prerequisite: MATH 140 or proficiency through MATH 140 as determined by the math placement exam. (4)

STAT 231: Introductory Statistics - MR

Descriptive statistics: measures of central tendency and dispersion. Inferential statistics: generalizations about populations from samples by parametric and nonparametric techniques. Methods covered will include estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation analysis, regression, chi square, and ANOVA analysis. Includes a required computer lab. Students should register for the lab corresponding to their lecture section. May not be taken for credit after MATH/STAT 242 has been taken. (4)

STAT 232: Introductory Statistics for Psychology Majors - MR

Descriptive statistics: measures of central tendency and dispersion. Inferential statistics: generalizations about populations from samples by parametric and nonparametric techniques. Methods covered will include estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation analysis, regression, chi square, and ANOVA analysis. Includes a required computer lab. Students should register for the lab corresponding to their lecture section. This section is intended for Psychology majors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or equivalent. (4)

STAT 233: Introductory Statistics for Sociology Majors - MR

Descriptive statistics: measures of central tendency and dispersion. Inferential statistics: generalizations about populations from samples by parametric and nonparametric techniques. Methods covered will include estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation analysis, regression, chi square, and ANOVA analysis. Includes a required computer lab. Students should register for the lab corresponding to their lecture section. This section is intended for Sociology majors. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or equivalent. (4)

STAT 242: Introduction to Mathematical Statistics

Data description, probability, discrete and continuous random variables, expectation, special distributions, statements of law of large numbers and central limit theorem, sampling distributions, theory of point estimators, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, regression (time permitting). Cross-listing with MATH 242. Previously was STAT/MATH 341. Prerequisite: MATH 151. (4)

STAT 287: Special Topics in Statistics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

STAT 288: Special Topics in Statistics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

STAT 289: Special Topics in Statistics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

STAT 291: Directed Study - MR

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

STAT 342: Probability and Statistical Theory

Continuation of STAT 242. Topics may include: joint and conditional distribtuions, correlation, functions of random variables, moment generating functions, inference in regression and one-way ANOVA, Bayesian and non-parametric inference, convergence of distributions. Cross-listed with MATH 342. Prerequisite: MATH 152 and four hours from STAT 231, 232, 233 or MATH/STAT 242. MATH 253 (or concurrent enrollment) is recommended. (4)

STAT 387: Special Topics in Statistics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

STAT 388: Special Topics in Statistics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

STAT 389: Special Topics in Statistics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

STAT 487: Special Topics in Statistics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

STAT 488: Special Topics in Statistics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

STAT 489: Special Topics in Statistics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

STAT 491: Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

STAT 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

THEA 160: Introduction to Theatre - AR

This introductory course to theatre surveys the general nature of dramatic presentation; including elements of dramatic structure, types of drama, and the contributions of the actor, director, designer, technician, and audience. (4)

THEA 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

THEA 215: Voice and Movement I

This course introduces Fitzmaurice Voicework, which is a combination of modified yoga, Shiatsu, and Reichian bodywork combined with classical voice training techniques, to promote awareness of an actor's voice and body. Material is explored through partnered work, observation, and discussion. (4)

THEA 225: Theatre Practicum

One semester hour credit may be earned each semester, but only 4 semester hours may be used to meet university requirements. Students put classroom theory to practical application by individually completing a project relating to an aspect of theatre. An instructor in the area of interest must approve the project and agree to provide guidance. Required of all Design/Tech Majors. (1)

THEA 250: Acting I - Fundamentals AR

This is an introductory course to acting. Students perform several scenes and monologues and learn the basic skills of scene selection, memorization, imagination, character, presentation, and delivery. (4)

THEA 255: Stage Production - AR

Basic theory and procedure of all backstage elements in the theatre, costumes, scenery, props, lights, makeup, and management. (4)

THEA 260: Stagecraft

This course will be a combination of lecture and hands on experience in the execution of scenic designs for the stage. It will provide students with instruction on safety procedures, construction techniques and materials, theatrical rigging, welding, and organizational planning of theatrical production. (4)

THEA 265: Fundamentals of Design

This course introduces the basic skills needed for scenic, lighting, and costume design. Students will learn to apply the elements of design and composition to exercises in research, hand drafting, renderings, and model building, for the express purpose of communication and collaboration. (4)

THEA 271: China Through Film - AR, C

An exploration of the history and recent directions of Chinese cinema, the relationship between film and other Chinese media, film and the Chinese government, and the particular appeal of Chinese film on the international market. No prior study of Chinese required. Cross-listed with CHIN 271. (4)

THEA 275: Scenic Painting

Students will learn the color theory and techniques used for painting scenery in theatrical applications. (2)

THEA 280: Computer-Aided Drafting

Introduces the use of Vectorworks to create light plots or scenic draftings for theatrical applications. Prerequisite: THEA 265. (2)

THEA 287: Special Topics in Theatre

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

THEA 288: Special Topics in Theatre

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

THEA 289: Special Topics in Theatre

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

THEA 290: Stage Management

Introduces the study and practice of stage management with an emphasis on understanding the basic functions of the stage manager in the theatrical production phase. (2)

THEA 315: Voice and Movement II

Builds on the basics of Voice and Movement I, as new methods of voice and movement are explored for creative inspiration and character development. Aspects of speech and text are an integral part of the course, as the student studies the International Phonetic Alphabet. Prerequisites: THEA 215. (4)

THEA 320: Makeup I

This course will familiarize the student with the basic techniques in theatrical makeup application. (2)

THEA 321: Makeup II

Builds on techniques introduced in Makeup I. Specialized work in planning and application of techniques, from straight makeup through aging, three-dimensional and special effects. Prerequisite: THEA 301. (2)

THEA 330: Script Analysis

Students engage in intensive discussion of the major theories of drama and apply those theories to the analysis of selected plays and productions from a number of historical periods. (4)

THEA 346: The Audition

Teaches audition techniques necessary to successful auditions for work in professional theatre productions. Audition material, techniques and research into challenges and opportunities in a professional career in the theatre and related fields are studied. (2)

THEA 350: Acting II - Scene Study

The students gain practical experience in the art of the actor through performance of partnered scenes from modern and contemporary theatre. This course focuses on the importance of analysis and the examination of current acting theory. Prerequisite: THEA 250 or consent of instructor. (4)

THEA 355: Lighting Design - AR

Examines the controllable properties of light and to apply them to the functions of theatrical lighting. Students will learn to express their ideas through research, critical analysis, presentation, and practical lab exercises. (4)

THEA 360: Theatre History I

This course surveys the history of theatre from its origins through the end of the 18th century. Students will examine theatre as an institution that both reflects historical moments and participates in the forming of social values and ideas. (4)

THEA 365: Theatre History II

This course surveys the history of theatre from the end of the 18th century through the present day. Students will examine theatre as an institution that both reflects historical moments and participates in the forming of social values and ideas. (4)

THEA 380: Directing I

Introduces the process of making choices about scripts, script analysis, casting, focus of scenes, and the mood, rhythm, pace and main idea of productions. This is a participatory course that includes readings, attendance at plays, exercise work, and scene direction. Prerequisite: THEA 250. (4)

THEA 387: Topics in Theatre

This course will be offered as needed, and it will allow the faculty and guest artists to explore areas of expertise and interest that are not normally taught as part of the curriculum. Concentrated study of a major theatrical period, movement, author, theme, genre, performance style, culture or technology (2 to 4)

THEA 388: Special Topics in Theatre

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

THEA 389: Special Topics in Theatre

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

THEA 390: Visual History: Period Costume and Décor

Surveys the architecture, interiors, clothing, culture, and aesthetic of the western world from the Greek Era to the Present. Students will be able to identify period through exposure to art, historical documents, and popular perspectives. (4)

THEA 425: Theatre Practicum

One semester hour may be earned each semester, but only four semester hours may be used to meet university requirements. Students put classroom theory to practical application by individually completing a project relating to an aspect of theatre. An instructor in the area of interest must approve the project and agree to provide guidance. Required of all Design/Tech Majors. (1)

THEA 450: Acting III - Shakespeare

This is an advanced course in acting designed to focus on language, interpretation, and enhancing audience appreciation and understanding. Advanced techniques in text analysis, focusing on scansion, the study of Shakespeare's folio, and in-depth scene study and performance. Prerequisites: THEA 220 and THEA 250, or consent of instructor. (4)

THEA 453: Costume Design - AR

Development of artistic and technical abilities in the field of costume design incorporating history, patterns, and renderings. (4)

THEA 455: Scenic Design - AR

Studies the process used by scenic designers to create a physical environment for the stage. Students will learn to analyze a theatrical text, formulate and express an approach through research, and execute their ideas through models and simple drafting. Prerequisite: THEA 265. (4)

THEA 480: Directing II

Builds on techniques learned in Directing I to develop stage productions. This includes interpreting text, analyzing premise, developing visual concepts, translating words and concepts into actions, and the process of communication between actors and designers. The course culminates in the direction of a one-act play. Prerequisite: THEA 370. (4)

THEA 487: Special Topics in Theatre

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

THEA 488: Special Topics in Theatre

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

THEA 489: Special Topics in Theatre

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

THEA 491: Independent Studies

Investigations or research in area of special interest not covered by regular courses; open to qualified junior or senior students. Requires pre-registration approved by a departmental sponsor. (1 to 4)

THEA 496: Advanced Scenographic Design

Each student will assume the role of lighting, scenic, or costume designer and collaboratively work to develop a design concept for a theatrical work. The students will complete a design process with advanced renderings, models, drafting, paperwork, and documentation. Prerequisites: THEA 265, THEA 453, and either THEA 355 or 455. (4)

THEA 499: Capstone - SR

This will serve as the culminating project for the theatre major. With approval and guidance from the theatre faculty, the student will develop and execute a substantial individual project that will reflect both the academic and practical knowledge gained through the study of the art of theatre. (2)

WMGS 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

WMGS 201: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies - A

An interdisciplinary introduction to the themes, issues, and methodological approaches that are central to the study of women, feminism, gender construction, and sexuality. Open to all students: required for WMGS majors and minors. (4)

WMGS 287: Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

WMGS 288: Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

WMGS 289: Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

WMGS 301: Feminist and Gender Theories

This course for majors and minors explores feminist and gender theories from global and diverse perspectives. Activities and assignments enable students to develop interdisciplinary research and practice within social justice frameworks. Prerequisites: WMGS 201, major/minor status, or permission of instructor. (4)

WMGS 387: Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

WMGS 388: Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

WMGS 389: Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

WMGS 487: Special Topics in Women's and Genderal Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

WMGS 488: Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

WMGS 489: Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

WMGS 491: Independent Study: Service Learning

Readings, research projects, or service learning projects in areas or issues of Women's and Gender Studies, under the supervision of a faculty member. (1 to 4)

WMGS 495: Internship

A pragmatic, employer-based experience in which students apply knowledge already acquired, build competence, and test values in setting like those in which they may seek employment. Internships require the approval of a WMGS faculty member who will supervise the work of the agency or organization supervisor who will directly supervise the student. (2 or 4)

WMGS 499: Senior Capstone - SR

As the culminating experience in the Women's and Gender Studies major, student will (1) participate in a seminar and (2) complete an academic project based on an internship and/or service learning experience. Students will work with faculty mentors to apply WMGS theories and methods to their academic projects. Prerequisites: WMGS 201 and at least 20 hours toward the WMGS major. (4)

WRIT 101: FYEP 101:Writing Seminar - WR

See General Education Program Requirements, The First-Year Experience. (4)

WRIT 201: Writing Seminars for International Students - WR

Organized thematically, these courses emphasize both the mechanics and process of writing. Students are placed in WRIT 201 or WRIT 202 according to ability. (4)

WRIT 202: Advanced Writing Seminar for International Students - WR

Organized thematically, this advanced course emphasizes both the mechanics and process of writing. Students are placed according to ability. (4)

Graduate Course Directory

BMSF 505: Financial Econometrics

Econometric methods in finance including specification, estimation, and testing in regression models as applied to financial problems. Analysis and forecasting of financial data including regression time series models. Detailed coverage of ARIMA models, nonstationary time-series, cointegration, and ARCH-GARCH models. Students use analytical software and basic programming/modeling skills on numerous real data sets. (4)

BMSF 507: Mathematical and Stochastic Foundations for Finance

Mathematical tools essential for finance, including matrix algebra, constrained optimization, ordinary and partial differential equations, numerical methods for optimization and differential equations, and statistics. Using financial examples, the focus is on stochastic process and stochastic calculus. Topics include: general probability theory, martingales, Brownian motion and diffusion, jump processes, and Ito's lemma. Students gain modeling skills using analytical software. (4)

BMSF 512: Financial Accounting: Reporting & Analysis I

Intermediate financial accounting, including financial reporting (IFRS and GAAP), financial statements analysis, analysis of inventories, assets, taxes, debt, and off-balance sheet assets, and liabilities. Emphasis on ratio and financial analysis, and the quality of reported data. (4)

BMSF 514: Foundations of Finance

Foundations of finance across a wide spectrum of topics including the essentials of corporate finance, equity investments, fixed income, derivatives, alternative investments, and portfolio management. (4)

BMSF 518: Financial Accounting: Reporting & Analysis II

Accounting topics including inventory, assets, inter-corporate investments, stock compensation, pensions, accounting for multinational firms, and financial statement analysis relevant to valuation. Includes accounting for business combinations. (4)

BMSF 530: Financial Markets, Institutions, Intermediaries

Money and banking systems, both domestic and international. Efficiency and effectiveness of different markets and the institutions that regulate and control them. Includes the study of domestic (e.g., Fed, Treasury, SEC, FINRA, FDIC, SIPC) and international (e.g., BIS, IMF, World Bank) institutions, as well as the role of financial intermediaries (e.g., investment banks). Essentials of securities regulation (e.g., Securities Acts of 1933/4, Regulation FD, Sarbanes-Oxley, Gramm-Leach-Billey, Dodd-Frank, Volcker Rule). (4)

BMSF 532: Valuation, Fixed Income, Derivatives, Alternatives

Valuation of investments, divisions, and firms, with an emphasis on projecting and discounting cash flows. Examines EVA, real options, and alternative methods of valuation with an emphasis on using Excel modeling. Fixed income and hybrid securities are examined including the valuation impacts of their features as well as fixed income portfolios and risk analysis (duration, convexity, immunization). In-depth analysis of derivative securities. Introduces several alternative investments including real estate, venture capital, private equity, private firms, and commodities. (4)

BMSF 534: Portfolio Theory and Management

Portfolio theory and application. Includes the development of investment policy statement including asset allocation and security selection tools. Study of the management of individual/family/institutional/pension portfolios across asset classes (equity, fixed income, alternatives) with regard to risk management, tax efficiency, liquidity, and execution of portfolio decisions. Covers performance reporting and attribution, and manager selection processes. (4)

BMSF 536: Advanced Corporate Finance

Issues faced by corporate financial managers within the firm at the firm- and investment levels. Covers firm financing structure, optimal capital structure derivation, financing alternatives, costs of financial distress, and financial securities (stocks, bonds, hybrids). Investment-level topics include tools for analyzing and financing projects, and intra-firm financial structuring alternatives. (4)

BMSF 538: Risk Management

Comprehensive risk management frameworks to categorize and understand financial and non-financial risk. Includes the measurement of risk, as well as the tools used to manage and multigate risk, including the use of derivatives. Covers the roles and aims of regulatory agencies and structures in managing risk. (2)

BMSF 548: Topics in Finance

Covers contemporary and critical topics in finance. Specific topics, readings, and projects are determined by the instructor. May be repeated up to maximum of 4 hrs. (1 to 4)

BMSF 591: Independent Study

Individualized reading and studies. Minimum supervision after initial planning of student's work. Rarely granted and requires approval of MSF director and consent of instructor. (1 to 4)

BMSF 595: Internship

Application of finance in field setting. Credit granted determined by hours spent in working environment and depth of project associated with course of study. Pass/Fail. (1 to 4)

BMSF 599: Capstone: Integration & Graduate Research in Finance

Program integration and research project in finance. (2 or 4)

BUSA 509: Global Business Perspectives

Cultural and environmental contexts for global business. Developing perspectives, personal competencies, and organizational capabilities for business success across borders and cultures. On-campus course followed by an international experience prior to graduation. (3) BUSA 509 Global Business Perspectives Lab: International experience. Pass/Fail. (0)

BUSA 510: Legal, Ethical and Social Responsibilities of Business

Explores legal, ethical, and social implications of business decision-making. Provides a framework of the legal environment in which business decisions are made. Explores implications of business decisions that incorporate concern for natural and social environments as well as the economic environment. (3)

BUSA 511: Accounting for Decision Making

An examination of financial and managerial accounting topics, including financial reporting, budgeting, and cost behavior. The focus is on using accounting to support ethical business decision-making. (3)

BUSA 513: Marketing Management

A practical approach to understanding and applying customer-directed marketing strategies for achieving organizational goals. Students will examine theoretical concepts and apply contemporary approaches to the marketing of services, products and ideas in business, public, and nonprofit organizations. (3)

BUSA 515: Organizations and Leadership

The leader’s role in creating organizational designs, processes and cultures that effectively engage rapidly shifting external realities, promote collaboration and problem solving, and enable organizations to continuously experiment, improve, and increase capabilities. Competencies for developing and managing people to meet performance requirements and organization cultural fit. (3)

BUSA 517: Understanding and Managing Financial Resources

Advanced treatment of corporate finance topics including cash flow forecasting, planning, budgeting, valuation models, cost of capital, leverage, and risk and return. Additional topics include ratio analysis, computer simulation, financial feasibility assessment, balance sheet analysis, determinants of interest rates, and the impact of business cycle fluctuations on shareholder value. (3)

BUSA 519: Corporate Information Systems Management

Examines the strategic role of information technology and systems in enabling decision-making and organizational effectiveness for competitive advantage. Discusses a broad range of information management topics including the impacts of information technology on organization and business models, corporate IT infrastructure and governance, sourcing and funding IT, and IT service and project delivery. Prerequisites: BUSA 509, BUSA 511. (3)

BUSA 521: Supply Chain and Operations Management

Manufacturing and service operations, and technologies within the enterprise and across the extended value chains. Topics include operations and quality management, value chain strategy, project management, integrating extended operations, international operations, current issues and the synergistic role of systems. Prerequisites: BUSA 509, 511. (3)

BUSA 522: The Global, Social, Political Environment of the Firm

Examination of the context within which individual firm decisions must be made. Topics include globalization, diversity within and among nations, the regulatory environment of the firm, the social, political and economic aspects of trade, the flow of capital, determinants of inflation and interest rates, business cycles, and related issues. Employs statistical and case analysis of how aggregate events have firm specific impacts. (3)

BUSA 523: Managing Innovation

Multidisciplinary approach to theories and practices of managing innovation and change for sustainable competitive advantage. Focus is on the planning and implementation of innovations, technologies, processes, or systems that pose significant uncertainty and the necessity for fundamental change in the organization's design, culture, and industry structure. Prerequisites: BUSA 522 or ECON 520, BUSA 509, 510, 511, 513, 515, 517. (3)

BUSA 535: Financial Investments

In depth evaluation of fundamental principles governing the valuation of individual investments and portfolios. Topics include valuation models, business cycles, real estate, commodity prices, determinants of interest rates and earnings, behavioral finance, risk and return, investment strategy, global markets, pension funds, and demographic influences on markets. Prerequisites: BUSA 522 or ECON 520, BUSA 517. (3)

BUSA 542: Leading Change

Leader competencies and practices for analyzing needs for organizational change, creating a shared vision, crafting implementation plans for multiple interventions, developing enabling structures and processes, enlisting political support and involving people, and for evaluating and institutionalizing changes. Prerequisite: BUSA 515. (3)

BUSA 549: Strategic Management of Human Capital

Issues and practices in the strategic management of human capital. Human resource strategy formulation, implementation, and evaluation in terms of return on investment and other impacts on firm performance. Human resource best practices for developing and sustaining a high-involvement workforce to achieve competitive advantage. Prerequisite: BUSA 515. (3)

BUSA 550: Leading Family and Closely-Held Enterprises

Explores issues unique to managing, working within, or advising closely held businesses. Role of closely held firms in global economy; control, fairness, and equity issues; succession; unique aspects of family firms including family dynamics inside and outside of the business. Prerequisites: BUSA 509, 510. (3)

BUSA 555: Knowledge Management

Provides a global and holistic perspective for leveraging knowledge through the integration of organizational theory, people, business processes and technology. Provides an integrated approach in managing an enterprise’s intellectual capital. Examines the implementation of knowledge management in business and nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: BUSA 509 or 515. (3)

BUSA 558: New Venture Management

Examines the entrepreneurial skills and conditions needed for effective business start-ups whether independent or within larger organizations. Prerequisite: BUSA 509, 511. (3)

BUSA 560: Managing Health Care Enterprises

Surveys policy and operational issues facing managers in the rapidly changing health care environment. Explores challenges of managing in health care settings, including hospitals, medical practice organizations, long-term care facilities and clinics. Discusses health care related organizations such as health insurance companies, consulting firms, managed care organizations, pharmaceutical companies, and other organizations that support the health care industry. Prerequisite: BUSA 515. (3)

BUSA 565: Marketing Strategy

Addresses development and execution of marketing strategies in a customer-driven marketplace. Explores theories, methods, analytical techniques, and current best practices for developing and implementing marketing strategies. Focus is on integrating marketing knowledge into applied strategy for the firm. Applies creative thinking and problem-solving skills to "real world" situations. Course includes classic readings, cases, and experiential learning. Prerequisite: BUSA 513. (3)

BUSA 570: Technology Management

Examines the critical role that technology plays in achieving organizational effectiveness and competitive advantages. Topics include planning, developing, sourcing, and controls of technology and systems, technology transfer and commercialization, technology road mapping, technology integration, marketing of technology, science and technology policy, and global issues in technology management. Prerequisite: BUSA 519. (3)

BUSA 577: Project Management

Study of project management principles and techniques including planning, network building, project control, reporting and closing to address the unique conditions and challenges associated with designing and managing major non-repetitive undertakings. Prerequisite: BUSA 515. (3)

BUSA 587: Special Topics in Business Administration

To provide graduate students with new, one-time and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. Selected advanced topics. (1 to 4)

BUSA 588: Special Topics in Business Administration

To provide graduate students with new, one-time and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. Selected advanced topics. (1 to 4)

BUSA 589: Special Topics in Business Administration

To provide graduate students with new, one-time and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. Selected advanced topics. (1 to 4)

BUSA 590: Strategic Management in a Global Context

An integrated study of business strategy formulation and implementation under conditions of continuing economic, technological, and competitive change in the global marketplace. Explores industry, competitive, and company analysis. Emphasis on path-finding to identify strategic choices that create sustainable advantage. Prerequisites: BUSA 509, 510, 511, 513, 515, 517, 519, 521, and 522 or ECON 520. (3)

BUSA 591: Independent Study

Individualized reading and studies. Minimum supervision after initial planning of student’s work. Rarely granted and requires prior approval of MBA director and consent of instructor. (1 to 4)

BUSA 595: Internship

Application of business knowledge in field setting. Credit granted determined by hours spent in working environment and depth of project associated with course of study. Pass/fail. (1 to 4)

COMA 543: Conflict and Negotiation

This course examines the sources and development of conflict and develops negotiation as a tool for managing conflict situations. Emphasis is on understanding conflict interactions and reaching agreement through negotiation. (3)

COMA 591: Independent Study

To provide individual graduate students graduate-level study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

ECON 500: Applied Statistical Analysis

An intensive introduction to statistical methods. Emphasis on the application of inferential statistics to concrete situations. (3)

ECON 503: Economics for Finance

Macro and micro-economics including market forces of supply and demand, the goal of the firm, national income and accounts, business cycles, the monetary system, inflation, international trade and capital flows, currency exchange rates, monetary and fiscal policy, economic growth, effects of government regulation and the impact of economic factors on investment markets. (4)

ECON 516: International Economics

Regional and international specialization, comparative costs, international payments and exchange rates; national policies that promote or restrict trade. (4)

ECON 520: Economic Policy Analysis

An intensive introduction to the concepts of macroeconomics and microeconomics with an emphasis on policy formation within a global framework. (3)

EDUC 503: On-Campus Workshops in Education

On-campus graduate workshops in education for varying lengths of time; enrollment subject to advisor's approval.

EDUC 503A: Tutorial in Reading Instruction

MA for Residency Certification Program course

EDUC 510: Teaching Reading and Language Arts

Investigates how children learn to read, improve their fluency, and strengthen their vocabulary and comprehension. Includes required reading tutoring practicum. (3)

EDUC 511: Strategies for Language/Literacy Development

The developmental nature of literacy learning with emphasis on the vital role of language and the interrelatedness and interdependence of listening, speaking, reading, and writing as language processes. (4)

EDUC 513: Language/Literacy Development: Assessment and Instruction

Understanding of a wide variety of strategies and tools for assessing and facilitating students' development in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Prerequisite: EDUC 510; highly recommended to be taken at the end of the track sequence. Cross-listed with SPED 513. (4)

EDUC 520: Current Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect

Issues of child abuse, neglect, harassment and violence. Includes identification and reporting procedures, and the legal and professional responsibilities of all mandated reporters. (1)

EDUC 528: Reading and Writing Across the K-8 Curriculum

Investigates genres of contemporary children's literature and how to develop a personal repertoire of reading material for classroom use. Also examines strategies for teaching writing in K-8 classroom. (2)

EDUC 529: Reading and Writing Across the Secondary Curriculum

Explores strategies for integrating young adult reading materials and written work and reading and writing instruction in all secondary content areas. (2)

EDUC 538: Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction (K-12)

The use of language as a tool for learning across the curriculum, and the roles of language in all kinds of teaching and learning in K-12 classrooms. Strategies for reading/writing in content areas, thematic teaching, topic study, and integrating curriculum. (4)

EDUC 544: Sociocultural Foundations of Education

Examines the purposes of K-12 schools, the root causes of the achievement gap, and the ways accomplished teachers adapt to the changing sociocultural context of schooling. (2)

EDUC 545: Inquiry and Action into Social Issues and Problems

Seminar synthesizing inquiry into social problems in educational and community settings. Critical examination of contemporary social issues that affect the success of youth and adults. (2)

EDUC 555A: Family and Community Engagement

Examines the roles and responsibilities of instructional leaders in promoting family and community engagement strategies that establish social networks of shared responsibility for student learning and development. Topics covered include building safe, communicative and culturally responsive school climates, initiating effective family involvement practices and fostering successful school-community partnerships. (1)

EDUC 555B: Family and Community Engagement

Examines the roles and responsibilities of instructional leaders in promoting family and community engagement strategies that establish social networks of shared responsibility for student learning and development. Topics covered include building safe, communicative and culturally responsive school climates, initiating effective family involvement practices and fostering successful school-community partnerships. (1)

EDUC 556: Critical Issues in Secondary Teaching

Introduces what successful secondary teachers know and are able to do in the areas of curriculum and assessment, instructional methods, and classroom management. (2)

EDUC 558: Reflective Seminar in Teacher Leadership

Assists candidates in preparing and presenting their culminating inquiry project on instructional leadership. The course promotes reflective dialogue and analysis of the formal and informal learning opportunities presented in the program with special attention devoted to candidates' ongoing professional growth and development. (4)

EDUC 560: Practicum

Guided instructional assistance and tutoring in schools. Designed for M.A.E.Program. (2)

EDUC 561: Instructional Methodologies for Secondary Teachers

This course will introduce the instructional methodologies being used currently in secondary schools, including curriculum design, instructional strategies, the use of assessments, and specific methodologies for content area instruction. (4)

EDUC 562: Schools and Society

Individual and cooperative study of the socio-cultural and cultural, political, legal, historical, and philosophical foundations of current practices of schooling in America. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.E./Cert Program or consent of instructor. (3)

EDUC 563A: Integrating Seminar: Application of Technology Tools for Teachers

Students work cooperatively and individually to integrate education course work, field experience, and individual perspective during graduate degree programs. May be repeated for credit. (2)

EDUC 563B: Integrating Seminar: Internship

A seminar focusing on development of professionalism and competence in inquiry and reflective practice. (2)

EDUC 564: The Arts, Mind, and Body

An exploration of methods to facilitate creativity and meaning-making in the classroom through visual, musical, non-verbal/physical movement, and dramatic arts. (2)

EDUC 565: Elementary Reading, Language Arts, Social Studies

Practice designing, implementing, and assessing lessons and units that integrate reading, language arts, and social studies content in K-8 classrooms. Introduces exemplary reading, language arts, and social studies classroom materials and examines what successful classroom managers in K-8 classrooms know and are able to do. (2)

EDUC 566: Elementary Math and Science

Practice designing, implementing, and assessing math and science lessons and units in K-8 classrooms. Introduces exemplary math and science classroom materials and examines what successful classroom managers in K-8 classrooms know and are able to do. (2)

EDUC 568: Internship in Teaching

Internship in classroom settings. Fourteen weeks of teaching under the direct supervision of cooperating teachers and university supervisors. Designed for students in the M.A.E./Cert program. (6)

EDUC 570: Introduction to Educational Leadership

Discussion of major leadership theories; qualities and skills necessary to develop as a strong educational leader; research in successful leadership strategies. (3)

EDUC 571: Schools and Their Communities

Understanding the role of strong community/family relationships in successful educational leadership. Teaming and collaboration, building community resource networks, and understanding the role of diversity as critical strategies in effective educational leadership. (3)

EDUC 574: Instruction and Curriculum: Theory and Development

Theories and development of effective instructional methodology and best practices for successful student learning. Strategies for effective instructional leaders to support teachers and students in the learning and teaching processes. Includes strategies for at-risk and special education. (3)

EDUC 575: Managing School Change and Reform

The nature and challenges of the process of change in an educational setting; the role of federal and state legislation and its impact on special populations. (2)

EDUC 576: Personnel Development

Effective leadership strategies for professional development, mentoring/coaching, supervision; contract law, hiring and firing of school personnel. (3)

EDUC 577: School Finance

Budget and finance operations of a school and district. To include federal, state, and local support; financial planning and budget; site-based budgeting; and purchasing, accounting, and auditing. (2)

EDUC 578: School Law

Overview of school law; impact on all legal aspects of schooling. Includes educational implications of constitutional, case, and statutory law as it affects teachers, students, parents, and others. Includes legal aspects on special education in the areas of due process, discipline, and instruction. (3)

EDUC 580: Instructional Theory and Practice I: Culture, Context and Community

Addresses how learning is impacted by the social, cultural and economic context in which it occurs. The course examines the instructional implications of theory and research on culturally relevant and responsive teaching, classroom climate and community building, and other contextual factors that impact student academic achievement. (4)

EDUC 581: Instructional Theory and Practice II: Thinking, Doing and Knowing

Investigates how theory and research on cognition, learning and brain development inform instructional practice. In particular, the course examines the design of inclusive, developmentally appropriate and technologically enhanced instructional environments, effective teaching models in the subject matter disciplines, and the continuous integration of curriculum, instruction and assessment. (4)

EDUC 582: Instructional Leadership I: Standards-based Teaching, Learning, & Assessment

Introduces candidates to the principles and practices of effective instructional leadership in K-12 schools. Topics covered include curriculum development and alignment as standards-based teaching, learning and assessment; the demonstration and assessment of instructional effectiveness; and the collection, analysis and presentation of student achievement data utilizing best practices in technology. (4)

EDUC 583: Instructional Leadership II: Teacher Development and the School Improvement Process

Examines the role of instructional leaders in the school improvement planning process and the development and stewardship of professional learning communities. Attention is specifically devoted to the instructional leaders' roles as mentors, coaches and facilitators, including theories and best practices of adult learning and communication, team building, and teacher advocacy and development. (4)

EDUC 584: Schools and Districts as Learning Organizations

Analyzes how schools and school districts produce, manage and apply knowledge in pursuit of identified organizational reform goals and professional development initiatives. Topics covered include organizational change and capacity building, educational policy and reform, and the power and politics of organizational decision-making. (2)

EDUC 585: Comparative Education

Comparison and investigation of materials and cultural systems of education throughout the world. Emphasis on applying knowledge for greater understanding of the diverse populations in the K-12 educational system. (3)

EDUC 587: History of Education

A study of great men and women whose lives and writings have shaped and continue to shape the character of American education. (3)

EDUC 588: ST: Leadership in Higher Education

Leadership development for administrators and faculty. Focus on higher education leadership models as they relate to PLU. Restricted to PLU administrators and faculty. (1 to 4)

EDUC 589: Philosophy of Education

Philosophical and theoretical foundations of American education as well as the social philosophy of growing diverse populations in the K-12 schools. (3)

EDUC 590: Culminating Seminar

M.A.E./Certification candidates finalize their professional growth plans by revisiting foundational questions from the beginning of the program, reviewing key concepts from individual courses, re-examining PLU's emphasis on "educating for lives of thoughtful inquiry, service, and care," and comparing and contrasting their internship experiences. (4)

EDUC 591: Independent Study

To provide individual graduate students graduate-level study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

EDUC 593: Culminating Professional Portfolio

The Culminating Professional Portfolio (CPP) reflects a candidate's professional growth resulting from completed educational coursework and clinical experience. The CPP contains performance-based documentation of each candidate's knowledge, skills, dispositions, and professional behaviors. Rubrics are aligned with ISLLC and PESB Standards. Students present their electronic portfolios at a practitioner reviewed showcase conference. Pass/fail only. (2)

EDUC 595: Internship in Educational Administration

Students will register for two semester hours in each of two semesters. Internship in educational administration jointly planned and supervised by the School of Education and Kinesiology and public and/or private school administrators in full compliance with state requirements. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program or to the credentialing program; completion of educational administration concentration; consultation with advisor. (2, 2)

EDUC 596: Reflective Seminar

Students register for one semester hour in each of two semesters. Professional seminars are scheduled and presented by candidates, their university professors, and professional colleagues in the schools in partnership. Prerequisites: Completion of coursework in educational administration concentration. (1,1)

EDUC 597: Independent Study

Projects of varying length related to educational issues or concerns of the individual participant and approved by an appropriate faculty member and the dean. (1 to 4)

EDUC 598: Studies in Education

A research paper or project on an educational issue selected jointly by the student and the graduate advisor. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program; EDUC 544, 545; minimum of 26 hours of coursework leading to the M.A.; consultation with the student's advisor. Pass/Fail only. (3)

EDUC 599: Thesis

The thesis problem will be chosen from the candidate's major field of concentration and must be approved by the candidate's graduate committee. Candidates are expected to defend their thesis in a final oral examination conducted by their committee. Pass/fail only. (3 or 4)

ENGL 504: Summer Residency I

16 hours of required workshops. 20 additional hours of lectures and mini-courses (topics in genre/topics in craft), readings. Design an independent course of study with a mentor for the upcoming year. (4)

ENGL 505: Summer Residency II

16 hours of required workshops. 20 additional hours of lectures and mini-courses (topics in genre/topics in craft), readings. Design an independent course of study with a mentor for the upcoming year. (4)

ENGL 506: Summer Residency III

16 hours of required workshops, 20 additional hours of lectures and mini-courses (topics in genre/topics in craft), readings. Design an independent course of study with a mentor for the upcoming year. (4)

ENGL 507: Summer Residency IV

Teaching a class based on critical paper or outside experience. Public reading from creative thesis. Participation in workshops and classes. Graduation. (4)

ENGL 511: Writing Mentorship I

One-on-one correspondence with a professional mentor in a genre or genres of choice. Approximately 15 hours of work per week on creative and critical writing. 8 mailings. Emphasis on original work. 24 required texts with approximately 40 pages of critical writing. (4 credits fall, 4 credits spring)

ENGL 512: Writing Mentorship II

One-on-one correspondence with a professional mentor in a genre or genres of choice. Approximately 15 hours of work per week on creative and critical writing. 5 mailings. Continued emphasis on original work. 15 required texts with approximately 25 pages of critical writing. Implementation of a field experience (approximately 100 hours) to be set up in collaboration with the director of the program, who will act as advisor on the project. (4 credits fall, 4 credits spring)

ENGL 513: Writing Mentorship III

One-on-one correspondence with a professional mentor in a genre or genres of choice. Approximately 15 hours of work per week on creative and critical writing. 3 mailings. Emphasis on critical paper (20-40 pages). (4)

ENGL 591: Independent Study

To provide individual graduate students graduate-level study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

ENGL 595: Internship

To permit graduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

ENGL 598: Non-thesis Research Project

To provide graduate students with graduate-level non-thesis research opportunities. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Project: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

ENGL 599: Thesis

One-on-one correspondence with a professional mentor in a genre of genres of choice. 3 mailings. Emphasis on organization of creative thesis (book-length manuscript), final revision, planning for public presentation (class or lecture). (8)

EPSY 540: Teacher Portfolio Assessment

Introduces candidates to the art and practice of 21st Century evidence-based professional portfolio development. The primary focus of the course is on the collection, analysis and presentation of candidates' instructional impact on student learning according to the descriptors of practice featured in Standard V of the Washington State Professional Educators Standards Board "System of Preparing and Certifying Educators." Candidates must demonstrate competency to pass this and other summer classes - EDUC 580 and 581. (2)

EPSY 540X: Demonstrating Teacher Competency and Student Achievement

Addresses how learning is impacted by the social, cultural and economic context in which it occurs. The course examines the instructional implications of theory and research on culturally relevant and responsive teaching, classroom climate and community building, and other contextual factors that impact student academic achievement. (2 to 10)

EPSY 541A: Assessing Student and Staff Instructional Needs

Focuses on the ongoing assessment of student learning and staff instructional needs. Topics covered include planning the assessment-centered classroom, improving instructional practice through purposeful observation and mentoring, promoting and evaluating effective instructional strategies and aligning curriculum, instruction and assessment. (1)

EPSY 541B: Assessing Student and Staff Instructional Needs

Focuses on the ongoing assessment of student learning and staff instructional needs. Topics covered include planning the assessment-centered classroom, improving instructional practice through purposeful observation and mentoring, promoting and evaluating effective instructional strategies and aligning curriculum, instruction and assessment. (1)

EPSY 542: Group Dynamics and Instructional Leadership

Explores interpersonal dynamics that impact instructional leadership and community building in schools. Topics covered include modes of communication, group norms, role identification, intercultural understanding, social capital, emotional intelligence, conflict and conflict mediation. (2)

EPSY 566: Advanced Cognition, Development and Learning

The study of principles and current thought and research in cognition, development, and learning. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA/Cert program or consent of instructor. (2)

EPSY 587: Special Topics in Educational Psychology

To provide graduate students with new, one-time and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EPSY 588: Special Topics in Educational Psychology

To provide graduate students with new, one-time and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. Selected advanced topics. (1 to 4)

EPSY 589: Special Topics in Educational Psychology

To provide graduate students with new, one-time and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. Selected advanced topics. (1 to 4)

EPSY 597: Independent Study

Projects of varying length related to educational issues or concerns of the individual participant and approved by an appropriate faculty member and the dean. (1 to 4)

MFTH 500: Human Development

Individual personality development, normal and abnormal manifestations, over the life span. (4)

MFTH 503: Systems Approach to Marriage and Family Therapy

An introduction to the systems paradigm and post-modern ideas for treatment strategy and intervention. (4)

MFTH 504: Family Development

Exploration of how family life cycle stages are affected by divorce, remarriage, ethnicity, feminist issues, and other unplanned events. (4)

MFTH 505: Research Methods in Marriage and Family Therapy

Basic research concepts including formulating research questions, research design, analysis of data, and theory construction. Emphasis on understanding and evaluating rather than conducting research. (3)

MFTH 507: Comparative Marriage and Family Therapy

Intensive comparative study of the theoretical rationale of the prominent schools of thought within the field of marriage and family therapy. Prerequisite: MFTH 503. (4)

MFTH 510: Human Sexuality, Sex Therapy, and Couples Therapy

An overview of the diversity of human sexuality, sexual identity and gender identity expression, and a study of basic clinical approaches to individual and relational sexual issues and challenges as well as couples therapy models. Issues of discomfort and biases around sexuality are also addressed. (4)

MFTH 511: Psychosocial Pathology: Relationship to Marriage and Family

Exploration of the treatment techniques and assumptions of leading family therapists regarding such psychosocial dysfunctions as divorce, family violence, delinquency, psychosomatic symptoms, drug addiction, and disturbed adolescents. Prerequisite: MFTH 503. (4)

MFTH 512: Professional Studies in Marriage and Family Therapy

Study of professional ethics and Washington State laws which affect clinical practice, including family law, legal responsibilities, and interprofessional cooperation. (4)

MFTH 519: Practicum I

First semester of practica required as part of the continuous process toward developing specific therapeutic competencies in work with individuals, couples and families. (2)

MFTH 520: Theory I

First semester of theory taken in conjunction with MFTH 519. (2)

MFTH 521: Practicum II

Second semester of practica required as part of the continuous process toward developing specific therapeutic competencies in work with individuals, couples, and families. (2)

MFTH 522: Theory II

Second semester of theory taken in conjunction with MFTH 521. (2)

MFTH 523: Practicum III

Third semester of practica required as part of the continuous process toward developing specific therapeutic competencies in work with individuals, couples, and families. (2)

MFTH 524: Theory III

The three semesters of theory taken in conjunction with MFTH 519, 521, and 523 constitute an in-depth study of one approach toward marriage and family therapy with an emphasis on applying theory in practice. (2)

MFTH 525: Practicum IV

The four semesters of practica are part of a continuous process toward developing specific therapeutic competencies in work with individuals, couples, and families. The practica present a competency-based program in which each student is evaluated regarding: (a) case management skills; (b) relationship skills; (c) perceptual skills; (d) conceptual skills; (e) structuring skills; and (f) professional development skills. Practica requirements include 100 hours of supervision of 500 client contact hours. Faculty are AAMFT-Approved Supervisors or the equivalent and use live supervision and video tapes of student sessions as the primary methods of clinical supervision. (2)

MFTH 526: Development of a Personal Integrated Theory

The fourth semester of theory taken in conjunction with MFTH 525 is an in-depth study of the student's preferred ideas, style, methods, and values. Students develop an integrated personal approach to marriage and family therapy that synthesizes their learning in the program. (2)

MFTH 527: Extended Practicum V

For students who wish to complete their required practica in five rather than four semesters. This course is an extension of the previously described practica courses. (2)

MFTH 590: Graduate Seminar

Selected topics as announced. (1 to 4)

MFTH 599: Thesis

To permit graduate students to demonstrate their ability to do independent research. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Thesis: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (4)

NURS 220: Nursing Competencies I

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies of therapeutic communication, and technical skills associated with health management. Includes a clinical practicum 50-64 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 205, 206; CHEM 105, PSYC 101. Pre- or Co-requisites: BIOL 201, PSYC 320. (4)

NURS 260: Professional Foundations I

Focuses on nursing as a profession and discipline. The nursing process is introduced as a framework for critical thinking and caring. Open to non-nursing students with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: NURS 220. (4)

NURS 270: Health Assessment and Promotion

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to perform health assessments and promote health across the life span. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent with NURS 260 and 280. (4)

NURS 320: Nursing Competencies II

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies of advanced technical skills associated with health management. Prerequisites: NURS 260, 270, 280, Junior I status. (2)

NURS 330: Pharmacology and Therapeutic Modalities for Nursing

Focuses on pharmacological principles of major drug classifications, therapeutic modalities, and alternatives to pharmacological interventions. Prerequisite for majors: NURS 280, achievement of Junior I status. Non-majors must receive permission from the instructor. (4)

NURS 340: Nursing Situations with Individuals: Adult Health I

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with individuals experiencing selected alterations in health. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 320 and 330, achievement of Junior I status. (4)

NURS 350: Nursing Situations with Individuals: Mental Health

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with individuals experiencing mental health issues. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 330, achievement of Junior I status. (4)

NURS 370: Nursing Situations with Families: Childbearing

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with childbearing families. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 320, 330, 340, 350, achievement of Junior II status. (4)

NURS 380: Nursing Situations with Families: Childrearing

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with infants, children, adolescents and their families. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 320, 330, 340, 350, achievement of Junior II status. (4)

NURS 430: Nursing Situations with Communities

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with the community as client. Includes a clinical 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 420, achievement of Senior I status. (5)

NURS 440: Nursing Situations with Individuals: Adult Health II

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with individuals experiencing complex alterations in health. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 360, 370, and 380, achievement of Senior I status. (4)

NURS 441: Senior Seminar

Exploration and integration of core knowledge and competencies related to complex alterations in the health of individuals experiencing complex alterations in health. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 440 and achievement of Senior I status. (1)

NURS 480: Professional Foundations II

Critical evaluation of role transition into professional nursing. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in NURS 499, achievement of Senior II status. (2)

NURS 499: Capstone: Nursing Synthesis - SR

Synthesis of core knowledge, competencies, professional values, and leadership skills in nursing situations mentored by a professional nurse preceptor. Includes a clinical practicum 252-356 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 420, 430, 440, 441, prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 460 and 480, and achievement of Senior II status. (6)

NURS 523: Roles of the Advanced Nurse

Facilitates the development and transition into the advanced nursing roles through analysis of ethical, professional, social and practice perspectives. (3)

NURS 524: Advanced Health Promotion

Identification of health risks and protective strategies for diverse populations. (2)

NURS 525: Theoretical Foundations

Preparation for critique, evaluation, and use of a range of relevant theories that provide guiding perspectives for the provision of client-centered, clinically measurable advanced nursing practice. (3)

NURS 526: Nursing Leadership and Management

Introduction to policy, organization, and financing of health care. Preparation for provision of quality cost-effective care, participation in the design and implementation of care, and assumption of the leadership role in managing resources. (3)

NURS 527: Evaluation and Outcomes Research

Preparation for the critique and use of new knowledge to provide, change, and evaluate advanced nursing practice focused on client-centered, clinically demonstrable care. (3)

NURS 530: Resource Management

Management of resources in the planning, coordination, and/or delivery of health care with an outcome perspective at the system level. Financial and human resources and systems management will be examined from a quality perspective. (3)

NURS 531: Care and Outcomes Manager Practicum I

Direct and/or indirect care given in a defined specialty setting with focus on evaluation and outcomes. Includes clinical practicum of 60-240 hours. Prerequisite: NURS 523. Variable credit with School of Nursing approval. (1 to 5)

NURS 532: Care and Outcomes Manager Practicum II

Direct care or indirect clinical management, supervision, or education to achieve client goals by implementing approaches, interventions, outcomes, and evaluation method. Includes clinical of 60-300 hours. Pre- or Co-requisite: NURS 538. Variable credit with School of Nursing approval. (1 to 6)

NURS 538: Program Development

Integrate theoretical models, clinical parameters, and program planning principles through the construction of a detailed program for care and outcomes management. Clinical component present. Pre- or co-requisite: NURS 530 and prerequisite NURS 531. (3)

NURS 540: Illness and Disease Management

Builds on the foundations of pathophysiology, pharmacology, and health assessment and focuses on the attainment of positive clinical outcomes for a cohort or population. Includes clinical practicum of 30-60 hours. (2)

NURS 550: Curriculum and Instruction

Examination of the theory and practice of curriculum planning, development, implementation, and evaluation. Theoretical and philosophical principles of the teaching/learning process. Analysis of adult teaching strategies and the process of self and student evaluations. (3)

NURS 580: Advanced Pathophysiology

Focuses on normal physiologic and pathologic mechanisms of disease. Primary components of the foundation for clinical assessment, decision making, and management. (3)

NURS 582: Advanced Health Assessment

Development and performance of the skills needed for advanced health assessment of individuals, families, or communities throughout the lifespan. Includes clinical practicum of 30-120 hours. Prerequisites: Basic health assessment skills. (2 to 4)

NURS 583: Clinical Pharmacotherapeutics

Focuses on the pharmacokinetic basis for and pharmacotherapeutic management of simple and complex disease processes. Includes ethical, legal, and procedural aspects of prescriptive authority. Pre- or co-requisite: NURS 580. (3)

NURS 584: Family Nurse Practitioner I

Application of theory and research in the management of health problems across the lifespan. Demonstration of diagnostic reasoning related to health care conditions. Seminar and clinical of 240 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 582 and pre- or co-requisite NURS 583. (6)

NURS 585: Family Nurse Practitioner II

Application of theory and research in the management of increasingly complex health problems across the lifespan. Demonstration of diagnostic reasoning for a wide range of acute and chronic conditions. Seminar and clinical. Includes clinical practicum of 180 hours. Prerequisite: NURS 584. (5)

NURS 591: Independent Study

Opportunities for advanced study in selected topic related to student's area of interest. Consent of dean required. (1 to 4)

NURS 593: Advanced Specialty Practice

Application of advanced practice nursing in clinical specialty practice. Includes clinical practicum of 60-480 hours. Prerequisite: Completion of all core requirements. (1 to 6)

NURS 595: Internship

To permit graduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

NURS 596: Scholarly Inquiry in Nursing Practice

Development and submission of professional paper or project related to one's area of specialization based on an evaluation and outcomes model. Cross-listed with NURS 599. (2)

NURS 599: Thesis

Faculty-guided application of the research process. May involve replication of previous study, secondary analysis of research data, an evaluation project, or an original investigation. Prerequisites: Completion of core courses, approval by School of Nursing. Minimum program requirement is four credits. Once enrolled, must continue to enroll for at least one credit each semester of the academic year until thesis is completed. Capstone course. Course may be taken more than once; this is a four-credit course; if repeated, credits may vary. (1 to 4)

SPED 520: Teaching Elementary Students with Special Needs

Introduction and overview of services for students with special needs in elementary programs. Includes procedural and substantive legal issues in special education, program modification, and classroom management. (2)

SPED 530: Assessment of Students with Special Needs

Examines the use of assessment information for making educational decisions about students. (2)

SPED 531: Severe and Profound Disabilities

Introduction to the physical, social, and educational needs of individuals with severe and profound disabilities. (2)

SPED 577: The Inclusive Classroom

Introduction to the principles and practices of inclusive education. (2)

SPED 583: Current Issues in Exceptionality

The characteristics of exceptional students and current issues involving the educator's role in dealing with their special needs. (2)

SPED 588: Legal, Ethical, and Administrative Issues in Special Education

Investigation of special education administrative practices, pupil placement procedures, student staffing, program reimbursement procedures, and federal funding models. (2)