Catalog 2013-2014

Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.)

253.535.7672
www.plu.edu/nursing
nurs@plu.edu

The School of Nursing offers three program options leading to the Master of Science in Nursing degree, each differing in the degree requirements for entry.

  • Traditional Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) program is designed for prepared registered nurses with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.)
  • The RN-B to M.S.N. program is designed for registered nurses with a baccalaureate degree in a non-nursing field.
  • The Entry-Level Master of Science in Nursing (EL-M.S.N.) program is a 27-month accelerated program designed for students with a prior non-nursing baccalaureate degree to earn RN licensure and achieve the Advanced Generalist M.S.N. degree.
Accreditation

The School of Nursing is a member of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and is approved by the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission. The Master of Science in Nursing program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). The Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) curriculum meets the requirements for the national certification examinations as an FNP. The Care and Outcomes Manager (COM) curriculum allows for foci that meets the requirements for Clinical Nurse Leader and Certified Nurse Educator certification.

M.S.N. Application Priority Deadlines

M.S.N. candidates may apply for admission at any time during the year; however, application by the indicated program-specific priority deadline will enhance applicants' potential for admission and for arranging financial assistance.

  • B.S.N. to M.S.N.: November 15/Rolling admissions for the following Summer (June). March 1/Rolling admissions for the following Fall Semester.
  • RN-B to M.S.N.: November 15/Rolling admissions for the following Summer (June).
  • Entry-Level M.S.N.: November 15/Rolling admissions for the following Summer (June).
Admission Criteria

 The following are the minimum criteria for consideration of admission to the Master of Science in Nursing program. Admission to the School of Nursing program is competitive; meeting minimum criteria does not guarantee admission.

  • Completion of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited college or university.
  • B.S.N. to M.S.N. applicants only: Hold a baccalaureate degree in nursing from a nationally accredited school of nursing.
  • B.S.N to M.S.N. and RN-B applicants only: Hold an active, unencumbered Washington State RN license.
  • A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 (B) on a 4.00 scale for all college work.
  • Minimum grade of 3.00 (B) on a 4.00 scale in each prerequisite course.
  • Submission of PLU Graduate Application forms and $40 non-refundable fee.
  • Submission of School of Nursing Addendum packet, which includes:
    • Questions Relative to Licensure;
    • Policy/Procedures for students who have attended another school of nursing; and
    • Policy/Procedures Regarding English Proficiency;
    • Physical/Psychological Expectations of Nurses preparing for Professional Practice.
  • Official transcripts from each college and university attended.
  • Official Graduate Record Exam (GRE) results from within five years. Minimum scores:   
    • 500 in both the verbal and quantitative section (or 150 verbal, 150 quantitative on the new scale) and 4.00 in analytical writing.
  • Professional résumé.
  • Statement of professional goals.
  • Two letters of recommendation.
  • Civil, administrative and criminal history clearance in all states as well as any other applicable territory or country.
  • Fluency in speaking, reading, writing and comprehending graduate-level English (see policy and procedures in the Graduate Application Addendum).
  • Any applicant who has previously attended any school or college of nursing must submit additional documentation (see policy and procedures in the Graduate Application Addendum).
Program Prerequisites

 All prerequisite courses must be completed at an accredited college or university with a minimum grade of 3.00 (B) or higher on a 4.00 scale before beginning the nursing program. No technical college courses fulfill prerequisite requirements. Prerequisites vary for the three M.S.N. program options; see individual program descriptions for a detailed list of prerequisite course requirements.

Advance Deposit

There are limitations on the numbers of students accepted into the M.S.N. programs and concentrations each year. Applicants accepted into the program are required to make a non-refundable $300 advance tuition payment to confirm their acceptance of an offer of admission within two weeks of their acceptance date.

Program Requirements

All admitted nursing students must provide valid documentation of the following by designated dates and before enrollment in any practicum/clinical course:

  • Immunization and health status;
  • CPR certification;
  • Comprehensive personal health insurance; and
  • Civil, administrative, and criminal history clearance in all states, as well as any other applicable territory or country.

In addition to these requirements, all B.S.N. to M.S.N. and RN-B to M.S.N. students in M.S.N. concentration coursework must also provide documentation of:

  • Unrestricted licensure as a registered nurse in the State of Washington and professional liability insurance.
Advising

The admission coordinator for the School of Nursing typically completes initial advising and program planning with applicants and admitted students. M.S.N. applicants are strongly encouraged to seek advising prior to applying to the program. Upon matriculation, all students are assigned a graduate faculty advisor.

Non-Matriculated Students

B.S.N.-prepared registered nurses may, with permission of the dean of the School of Nursing, enroll in up to nine semester hours of M.S.N. courses on a non-matriculated basis with School of Nursing approval. Non-matriculated students are by definition non-degree seeking individuals; and, therefore, not eligible for admission into any School of Nursing programs. For more information on non-matriculated status, see the Graduate School policies.

M.S.N. PROGRAM FOR B.S.N. (PREPARED REGISTERED STUDENTS)

The traditional Master of Science in Nursing program is designed for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) prepared registered nurses. The sequence of study recognizes the academic and professional success of the nursing graduate as groundwork for graduate study. A limited number of candidates is admitted each year and admission is competitive.

The Master of Science (M.S.N.) degree prepares professional nurses for roles such as advanced generalist, family nurse practitioner, Clinical Nurse Leader, as well as clinical nurse educator. The program also prepares the graduate for doctoral studies. The M.S.N. curriculum is evidence-based and practice-oriented, and consists of a common core (theory, advanced practice roles, evaluation and outcomes research, leadership and management, and advanced health promotion), specialty didactic and clinical/practicum experiences, and a capstone course (Scholarly Inquiry or Thesis). Each M.S.N. student completes coursework leading to either the Family Nurse Practitioner concentration or the Care and Outcomes Manager concentration. The latter may be further differentiated through focus areas, including Clinical Nurse Leader, nursing administrator, or clinical nurse educator. In contrasts to the Entry-Level M.S.N. applicant, prospective regular-entry M.S.N. students apply for admission and direct-entry into either the Care and Outcomes Manager (COM) or the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) concentration.

M.S.N. core and concentration requirements may be completed in four to five full-time semesters over two years. Part-time study is an option for students in the B.S.N. to M.S.N. route. Graduate-level nursing classes are structured to accommodate the part-time working nurse.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING CONCENTRATIONS
Care and Outcomes Manager (COM) Concentration

The M.S.N. Care and Outcomes Manager (COM) program is designed to equip nurses with the knowledge and skills to lead change, promote health and elevate care in various roles and settings. The curriculum prepares the M.S.N. COM graduate to provide flexible leadership and critical action within complex, changing systems, including health, educational, and organizational systems. The core M.S.N. curriculum prepares an advanced generalist, who has the knowledge and skills required for all masters-prepared nurses as determined by the AACN Essentials of Master's Education in Nursing (2011). The COM coursework is organized around learning modules that allow the program to be further tailored toward a specific role. Role specialization can include: nurse educator, Clinical Nurse Leader® (CNL), or nurse administrator. Students who focus on the nurse educator role are additionally required to take NURS 550 (Curriculum and Instruction) and focus their minimum 360 hour clinical practica in the education role to meet the nurse educator core competencies. In the CNL focus students meet the competencies for the clinical nurse leader role during the 400 hours of clinical practica and complete a 300 hour immersion in the CNL role. Students choosing to focus in nursing administration take approved graduate business courses; at the minimum, one course for three semester hours, as well as doing all their COM practica in the nursing administration role.

Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Concentration

This course of study focuses on client-centered clinical practice, and prepares nurses to respond to the needs of today's and tomorrow's health care consumers, to manage direct care based on advanced assessment and diagnostic reasoning, to incorporate health promotion and disease prevention interventions into health care delivery, and to recognize their potential for professional growth, responsibility and autonomy. Successful completion of the Family Nurse Practitioner program qualifies students to sit for national certifying examinations for family nurse practitioner, making them eligible under Washington State law for Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner (ARNP) licensure.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
33 to 48 semester hours

Prerequisite Course for Traditional M.S.N.: Introductory Statistics (including inferential and descriptive)

M.S.N. CORE
19 semester hours
  • NURS 523: Role of the Advanced Nurse (3)
  • NURS 524: Advanced Health Promotion (2)
  • NURS 525: Theoretical Foundations (3)
  • NURS 526: Nursing Leadership and Management (3)
  • NURS 527: Evaluation and Outcomes Research (3)
  • NURS 540: Illness/Disease Management (2)
  • NURS 580: Advanced Pathophysiology (3)
M.S.N. Capstone
2 to 4 semester hours
  • NURS 596: Scholarly Inquiry (2) or
  • NURS 599: Thesis (4)
Concentration Coursework
12 to 23 semester hour
s, as outlined below for the COM and FNP
Care and Outcomes Manager (COM) Concentration
12 semester hours

Required Courses:

  • NURS 530: Resource Management (3)
  • NURS 531: Care & Outcomes Manager Practicum I (3)
  • NURS 532: Care & Outcomes Manager Practicum II (6)

Additional courses are required for other COM role specializations. Please note that students who do not complete a role specialization graduate from the COM concentration as Advanced Generalist. 

M.S.N. Care and Outcomes Manager Sample Curriculum
12 to 15 months
33 semester hours (minimum)
First Year: Summer Session
  • NURS 580: Advanced Pathophysiology (3)
First Year: Fall Semester
  • NURS 523: Roles of the Advanced Nurse (3)
  • NURS 525: Theoretical Foundations (3)
  • NURS 526: Leadership and Management (3)
First Year: January Term
  • NURS 524: Advanced Health Promotion (2)
  • NURS 540: Illness and Disease Management (2)
First Year: Spring Semester
  • NURS 527: Evaluation and Outcomes Research (3)
  • NURS 530: Resource Management (3)
  • NURS 531: Care and Outcomes Manager Practicum I (3)
Second Year: Summer Session
  • NURS 532: Care and Outcomes Manager Practicum II (6)
  • NURS 596: Scholarly Inquiry (2)
M.S.N. Family Nurse Practitioner Sample Curriculum
24 Months
46 semester credits (minimum)
First Year: Summer Semester
  • NURS 580: Advanced Pathophysiology (3)
First Year: Fall Semester
  • NURS 523: Roles of the Advanced Nurse (3)
  • NURS 525: Theoretical Foundations (3)
  • NURS 526: Leadership and Management (3)
First Year: January Term
  • NURS 524: Advanced Health Promotion (2)
  • NURS 540: Illness and Disease Management (2)
First Year: Spring Semester
  • NURS 527: Evaluations and Outcomes Research (3)
  • NURS 530: Resource Management (3)
  • NURS 531: Care and Outcomes Manager Practicum I (3)
Second Year: Summer Semester
  • NURS 582: Advanced Health Assessment (2 to 4)
Second Year: Fall Semester
  • NURS 583: Clinical Parmacotherapeutics (3)
  • NURS 584: Family Nurse Practitioner I (6)
Second Year: Spring Semester
  • NURS 585: Family Nurse Practitioner II (6)
  • NURS 596: Scholarly Inquiry (2) OR NURS 599: Thesis (4)
RN-B TO M.S.N. PROGRAM FOR REGISTERED NURSES WITH A NON-NURSING BACHELOR’S DEGREE

The RN-B to M.S.N. Program is designed to allow registered nurses with a previous non-nursing bachelor's or higher degree to earn the M.S.N. degree in the Care and Outcomes Manager, Advanced Generalist area of focus; this program does not confer the B.S.N. degree. The sequence of study recognizes the academic success of the non-nursing graduate and RN licensure as groundwork for graduate study. The program is academically intensive to assure the student of adequate development as a master's prepared advanced generalist by the completion of the RN-B to M.S.N. program, but is structured to maximize the participant's ability to sustain employment. A limited number of candidates is admitted each year and admission is competitive.

All students are admitted to the RN-B to M.S.N. program in the Advanced Generalist focus, which is part of the Care and Outcomes Manager (COM) Concentration; prospective students are advised that completion of a B.S.N. degree is a requirement for direct-admission to a specialty program (FNP or COM in a focus area). Nevertheless, currently-enrolled RN-B to M.S.N. students who demonstrate a strong potential for success in a specialty may, when space allows, apply to be considered for selection into clinical specializations, such as FNP, COM-Clinical Nurse Educator focus, etc. RN-B to M.S.N. students must apply and be selected for a change of COM focus area or concentration at the completion of the first semester of M.S.N. core coursework. Students who do not apply or are not selected for participation in an alternative COM focus area or the FNP concentration remain in the COM-Advanced Generalist M.S.N. program. Admission to the RN-B to M.S.N. program does not guarantee progression into any other COM focus area or specializations (FNP, Educator, etc.); admission to specialties is highly selective and space is not guaranteed or reserved for RN-B to M.S.N. students. Students admitted to a specialty will incur additional time and expense, and depending on the specialty, are advised that intensive practica may impact their ability to work outside the program.

RN-B to M.S.N. students follow the traditional M.S.N. Advanced Generalist curriculum (see above), with the additional requirement of NURS 430: Situations with Communities (5 semester hours). NURS 430 is offered Spring and Fall Semesters at PLU. Enrollment in NURS 430 at PLU requires approval; space is limited). Nursing courses taken off-campus toward fulfillment of this requirement must be approved for equivalency by the dean of the School of Nursing prior to admission to the program.

RN-B TO M.S.N. PROGRAM SAMPLE CURRICULUM
32 semester hours (graduate-level, at minimum)
Prerequisite Courses
  • Introductory Statistics (including inferential and descriptive)
  • Human Anatomy and Physiology I (with lab)
  • Human Anatomy and Physiology II (with lab)
  • Introductory Microbiology (with lab)
  • Lifespan Developmental Psychology
RN-B to M.S.N. Program Requirement
  • NURS 430: Nursing Situations with Communities (5)
Year One: Summer (COM-Advanced Generalist)
  • NURS 580: Advanced Pathophysiology (3)
Year One: Fall Semester (M.S.N. Core)
  • NURS 523: Roles of the Advanced Nurse (3)
  • NURS 525: Theoretical Foundations (3)
  • NURS 526: Leadership and Management (3)
Year One: January Term (M.S.N. Core)
  • NURS 524: Advanced Health Promotion (2)
  • NURS 540: Illness and Disease Management (2)
Year One: Spring Semester (COM - Advanced Generalist)
  • NURS 527: Evaluation and Outcomes Research (3)
  • NURS 530: Resource Management (2)
  • NURS 531: Care and Outcomes Manager Practicum I (3)
Year Two: Summer Session (COM-Advanced Generalist)
  • NURS 532: Care and Outcomes Manager Practicum II (6)
  • NURS 596: Scholarly Inquiry (2)
ENTRY-LEVEL MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING PROGRAM

Care and Outcomes Manager Concentration, Advanced Generalist Focus

The Entry-Level M.S.N. is a cohort program designed to prepare candidates with a previous bachelor’s or higher degree to gain RN licensure and the M.S.N. degree. The sequence of study recognizes the academic success of the non-nursing graduate by providing a focused immersion into nursing followed by graduate study. Students do not receive a B.S.N. degree, but following successful completion of the first 15-months of study, they are eligible to sit for the NCLEX-RN for registered nurse licensure and to continue in the M.S.N. program in the Care and Outcomes Manager (COM) concentration, Advanced Generalist focus. A limited cohort is admitted each year and admission is competitive.

The Entry-Level M.S.N. program is clinically and academically intensive to assure the student of adequate exposure to the RN role and responsibilities, as well as to develop the student as master’s-prepared Advanced Generalist by the completion of the Entry-Level M.S.N. program. All students are admitted to the Entry-Level program in the Advanced Generalist focus, which is part of the Care and Outcomes Manager (COM) concentration. M.S.N. Entry-Level M.S.N. students may to apply to be considered for selection into other clinical specializations, such as FNP, COM-Clinical Nurse Educator focus, etc. Students who do not apply for, or are not selected for, participation in the alternative COM focus area or the FNP concentration remain in the COM-Advanced Generalist M.S.N. program.

Entry-Level M.S.N. students must maintain full-time status throughout their entire program of study. Prior to entering graduate-level studies, Entry-Level M.S.N. students participate in a 15-month intensive program at the undergraduate level leading to RN eligibility, during which time they are unable to maintain employment; after obtaining RN licensure midway through the program, the students are encouraged and expected to work part-time as nurses while enrolled full-time in graduate-level courses. Students are expected to complete the entire 27-month program with their cohort.

Please note: Students withdrawing from the Entry-Level M.S.N. program after RN licensure, but before completing the graduate degree, may not be able to sustain/obtain licensure in the State of Washington and other states.

ENTRY-LEVEL M.S.N. PRE-LICENSURE AND ADVANCED GENERALIST FOCUS CURRICULUM
55 semester hours (pre-licensure)
30 semester hours (post-licensure, at minimum)
Prerequisite Courses
  • Introductory Statistics (including inferential and descriptive) (4)
  • Human Anatomy and Physiology I (with lab) (5)
  • Human Anatomy and Physiology II (with lab) (5)
  • Introductory Microbiology (with lab) (4)
  • Lifespan Developmental Psychology (4)
Year One: Summer (Pre-Licensure)
  • NURS 220: Nursing Competencies I (4)
  • NURS 270: Health Assessment and Promotion (4)
  • NURS 320: Nursing Competencies II (2)
  • NURS 580: Advanced Pathophysiology (3)
Year One: Fall (Pre-Licensure)
  • NURS 260: Professional Foundations I (4)
  • NURS 330: Pharmacology & Therapeutic Modalities (4)
  • NURS 340: Nursing Situations w/ Individuals: Adult Health I (4)
  • NURS 350: Nursing Situations w/ Individuals: Mental Health (4)
Year One: January (Pre-Licensure)
  • NURS 380: Nursing Situations with Families: Childrearing (Peds) (4)
Year One: Spring (Pre-Licensure)
  • NURS 370: Nursing Situations w/ Families: Childbearing (OB) (4)
  • NURS 430: Nursing Situations with Communities (5)
  • NURS 440: Nursing Situations w/ Individuals: Adult Health II (4)
  • NURS 441: Situations Seminar (1)
Year Two: Summer (Pre-Licensure)
  • NURS 480: Professional Foundations II (2)
  • NURS 499: Nursing Synthesis (6)
After completing the pre-licensure curriculum and upon successfully obtaining RN licensure in Washington State, students continue the Entry-Level M.S.N. curriculum in the COM-Advanced Generalist focus (see below). Admission to the Entry-Level M.S.N. program does not guarantee progression into any other COM focus area or specializations (FNP, Educator, etc.). Entry-Level M.S.N. students must apply and be selected for a change of COM focus area or concentration at the completion of their first post-RN licensure semester. The availability of seats in other COM focus areas or the FNP concentration is not guaranteed or implied; when and if available, seats are limited and selection is therefore highly competitive.
Year Two: Fall (Licensure Pending, M.S.N. Core)
  • NURS 523: Roles of the Advanced Nurse (3)
  • NURS 525: Theoretical Foundations (3)
  • NURS 526: Leadership and Management (3)
Year Two: January (Post-Licensure, M.S.N. Core)
  • NURS 524: Advanced Health Promotion (2)
  • NURS 540: Illness/Disease Management (2)
Year Two: Spring (COM - Advanced Generalist)
  • NURS 527: Evaluation and Outcomes Research (3)
  • NURS 530: Resource Management (2)
  • NURS 531: Care and Outcomes Manager Practicum I (3)
Year Three: Summer (COM-Advanced Generalist)
  • NURS 532: Care & Outcomes Manager Practicum II (6)
  • NURS 596: Scholarly Inquiry (2)

Nursing (NURS) Graduate-Level Courses

NURS 220: Nursing Competencies I

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies of therapeutic communication, and technical skills associated with health management. Includes a clinical practicum 50-64 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 205, 206; CHEM 105, PSYC 101. Pre- or Co-requisites: BIOL 201, PSYC 320. (4)

NURS 260: Professional Foundations I

Focuses on nursing as a profession and discipline. The nursing process is introduced as a framework for critical thinking and caring. Open to non-nursing students with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: NURS 220. (4)

NURS 270: Health Assessment and Promotion

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to perform health assessments and promote health across the life span. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent with NURS 260 and 280. (4)

NURS 320: Nursing Competencies II

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies of advanced technical skills associated with health management. Prerequisites: NURS 260, 270, 280, Junior I status. (2)

NURS 330: Pharmacology and Therapeutic Modalities for Nursing

Focuses on pharmacological principles of major drug classifications, therapeutic modalities, and alternatives to pharmacological interventions. Prerequisite for majors: NURS 280, achievement of Junior I status. Non-majors must receive permission from the instructor. (4)

NURS 340: Nursing Situations with Individuals: Adult Health I

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with individuals experiencing selected alterations in health. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 320 and 330, achievement of Junior I status. (4)

NURS 350: Nursing Situations with Individuals: Mental Health

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with individuals experiencing mental health issues. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 330, achievement of Junior I status. (4)

NURS 370: Nursing Situations with Families: Childbearing

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with childbearing families. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 320, 330, 340, 350, achievement of Junior II status. (4)

NURS 380: Nursing Situations with Families: Childrearing

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with infants, children, adolescents and their families. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 320, 330, 340, 350, achievement of Junior II status. (4)

NURS 430: Nursing Situations with Communities

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with the community as client. Includes a clinical 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 420, achievement of Senior I status. (5)

NURS 440: Nursing Situations with Individuals: Adult Health II

Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to apply the nursing process to situations with individuals experiencing complex alterations in health. Includes a clinical practicum 84-112 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 360, 370, and 380, achievement of Senior I status. (4)

NURS 441: Senior Seminar

Exploration and integration of core knowledge and competencies related to complex alterations in the health of individuals experiencing complex alterations in health. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 440 and achievement of Senior I status. (1)

NURS 480: Professional Foundations II

Critical evaluation of role transition into professional nursing. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in NURS 499, achievement of Senior II status. (2)

NURS 499: Capstone: Nursing Synthesis - SR

Synthesis of core knowledge, competencies, professional values, and leadership skills in nursing situations mentored by a professional nurse preceptor. Includes a clinical practicum 252-356 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 420, 430, 440, 441, prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 460 and 480, and achievement of Senior II status. (6)

NURS 523: Roles of the Advanced Nurse

Facilitates the development and transition into the advanced nursing roles through analysis of ethical, professional, social and practice perspectives. (3)

NURS 524: Advanced Health Promotion

Identification of health risks and protective strategies for diverse populations. (2)

NURS 525: Theoretical Foundations

Preparation for critique, evaluation, and use of a range of relevant theories that provide guiding perspectives for the provision of client-centered, clinically measurable advanced nursing practice. (3)

NURS 526: Nursing Leadership and Management

Introduction to policy, organization, and financing of health care. Preparation for provision of quality cost-effective care, participation in the design and implementation of care, and assumption of the leadership role in managing resources. (3)

NURS 527: Evaluation and Outcomes Research

Preparation for the critique and use of new knowledge to provide, change, and evaluate advanced nursing practice focused on client-centered, clinically demonstrable care. (3)

NURS 530: Resource Management

Management of resources in the planning, coordination, and/or delivery of health care with an outcome perspective at the system level. Financial and human resources and systems management will be examined from a quality perspective. (3)

NURS 531: Care and Outcomes Manager Practicum I

Direct and/or indirect care given in a defined specialty setting with focus on evaluation and outcomes. Includes clinical practicum of 60-240 hours. Prerequisite: NURS 523. Variable credit with School of Nursing approval. (1 to 5)

NURS 532: Care and Outcomes Manager Practicum II

Direct care or indirect clinical management, supervision, or education to achieve client goals by implementing approaches, interventions, outcomes, and evaluation method. Includes clinical of 60-300 hours. Pre- or Co-requisite: NURS 538. Variable credit with School of Nursing approval. (1 to 6)

NURS 538: Program Development

Integrate theoretical models, clinical parameters, and program planning principles through the construction of a detailed program for care and outcomes management. Clinical component present. Pre- or co-requisite: NURS 530 and prerequisite NURS 531. (3)

NURS 540: Illness and Disease Management

Builds on the foundations of pathophysiology, pharmacology, and health assessment and focuses on the attainment of positive clinical outcomes for a cohort or population. Includes clinical practicum of 30-60 hours. (2)

NURS 550: Curriculum and Instruction

Examination of the theory and practice of curriculum planning, development, implementation, and evaluation. Theoretical and philosophical principles of the teaching/learning process. Analysis of adult teaching strategies and the process of self and student evaluations. (3)

NURS 580: Advanced Pathophysiology

Focuses on normal physiologic and pathologic mechanisms of disease. Primary components of the foundation for clinical assessment, decision making, and management. (3)

NURS 582: Advanced Health Assessment

Development and performance of the skills needed for advanced health assessment of individuals, families, or communities throughout the lifespan. Includes clinical practicum of 30-120 hours. Prerequisites: Basic health assessment skills. (2 to 4)

NURS 583: Clinical Pharmacotherapeutics

Focuses on the pharmacokinetic basis for and pharmacotherapeutic management of simple and complex disease processes. Includes ethical, legal, and procedural aspects of prescriptive authority. Pre- or co-requisite: NURS 580. (3)

NURS 584: Family Nurse Practitioner I

Application of theory and research in the management of health problems across the lifespan. Demonstration of diagnostic reasoning related to health care conditions. Seminar and clinical of 240 hours. Prerequisites: NURS 582 and pre- or co-requisite NURS 583. (6)

NURS 585: Family Nurse Practitioner II

Application of theory and research in the management of increasingly complex health problems across the lifespan. Demonstration of diagnostic reasoning for a wide range of acute and chronic conditions. Seminar and clinical. Includes clinical practicum of 180 hours. Prerequisite: NURS 584. (5)

NURS 591: Independent Study

Opportunities for advanced study in selected topic related to student's area of interest. Consent of dean required. (1 to 4)

NURS 593: Advanced Specialty Practice

Application of advanced practice nursing in clinical specialty practice. Includes clinical practicum of 60-480 hours. Prerequisite: Completion of all core requirements. (1 to 6)

NURS 595: Internship

To permit graduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

NURS 596: Scholarly Inquiry in Nursing Practice

Development and submission of professional paper or project related to one's area of specialization based on an evaluation and outcomes model. Cross-listed with NURS 599. (2)

NURS 599: Thesis

Faculty-guided application of the research process. May involve replication of previous study, secondary analysis of research data, an evaluation project, or an original investigation. Prerequisites: Completion of core courses, approval by School of Nursing. Minimum program requirement is four credits. Once enrolled, must continue to enroll for at least one credit each semester of the academic year until thesis is completed. Capstone course. Course may be taken more than once; this is a four-credit course; if repeated, credits may vary. (1 to 4)