Catalog 2013-2014

Anthropology

253.535.7595
www.plu.edu/anthropology/
anthro@plu.edu

Anthropology as a discipline tries to bring all of the world's people into human focus. Though anthropology does look at "stones and bones," it also examines the politics, medicines, families, arts, and religions of peoples and cultures in various places and times. This makes the study of anthropology a complex task, for it involves aspects of many disciplines, from geology and biology to art and psychology.

Anthropology is composed of four fields. Cultural or social anthropology studies living human cultures in order to create a cross-cultural understanding of human behavior. Archaeology has the same goal, but uses data from the physical remains of the past cultures to reach it. Linguistic anthropology studies human language. Biological anthropology studies the emergence and subsequent biological adaptations of humanity as a species.

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
Major in Anthropology

36 semester hours

Required: ANTH 102, 103, 480, 499.
Choose: ANTH 101 or 104; 4 semester hours from 330-345 (peoples courses); 4 semester hours from ANTH 350-465 (topics courses); 8 additional hours in anthropology, at least 4 of which must be above ANTH 300.

MINOR
20 semester hours

Required: ANTH 102.
Choose: ANTH 101 or 103 or 104; 4 semester hours from ANTH 330–345; 4 semester hours from ANTH 350–499; and 4 additional semester hours in anthropology.

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS

In recognition of outstanding work, the designation with departmental honors may be granted by vote of the anthropology faculty based on the student’s performance in the following areas:

  • Anthropology course work requires minimum 3.50 GPA.

  • Demonstration of active interest in anthropological projects and activities outside of class work.

  • Completion of a senior thesis. A paper describing independent research must be conducted under the supervision of departmental faculty. A proposal must be approved by the faculty by the third week of class of the fall semester for May and August graduates, and the third week of class of the spring semester for December and January graduates.

  • The departmental honors designation will appear on the transcript of a student graduating with an anthropology major.

Anthropology (ANTH) Undergraduate-Level Courses

ANTH 101: Introduction to Human Biological Diversity - SM

Introduction to biological anthropology with a special focus on human evolution, the fossil evidence for human development, the role of culture in human evolution, and a comparison with the development and social life of the nonhuman primates. (4)

ANTH 102: Introduction to Human Cultural Diversity - C, SO

Introduction to social-cultural anthropology, concentrating on the exploration of the infinite variety of human endeavors in all aspects of culture and all types of societies; religion, politics, law, kinship and art. (4)

ANTH 103: Introduction to Archaeology and World Prehistory - SO

Introduction to the ideas and practice of archaeology used to examine the sweep of human prehistory from the earliest stone tools to the development of agriculture and metallurgy and to enrich our understanding of extinct societies. (4)

ANTH 104: Introduction to Language in Society - SO

Introduction to anthropological linguistics and symbolism, including the origin of language; sound systems, structure and meaning; language acquisition; the social context of speaking; language change; nonverbal communication; and sex differences in language use. (4)

ANTH 190: FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

ANTH 192: Practicing Anthropology: Makah Culture Past and Present - A, SO

Study of Makah culture through archaeology and history and by interacting with the Makah. Active and service learning in Neah Bay, visiting the Makah Nation. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (4)

ANTH 210: Global Perspectives: The World in Change - C, SO

A survey of global issues: modernization and development; economic change and international trade; diminishing resources; war and revolution; peace and justice; and cultural diversity. (Although this course is cross-listed with HIST/POLS 210, students receive anthropology credit only when this course has a faculty member from anthropology.) (4)

ANTH 220: Peoples of the World - SO

Exploration of the world's cultures through anthropological films, novels, and eyewitness accounts. Case studies chosen from Africa, Native America, Asia, the Pacific, and Euro-America provide an insider's view of ways of life different from our own. (2)

ANTH 225: Past Cultures of Washington State - A, SO

Native Americans have lived in Washington State for more than 12,000 years. Cultures of coastal interior peoples are examined through time until the emergency of the distinctive cultures observed by the earliest European visitors to the area. Particular attention is focused on the impact of archaeology on contemporary peoples. (2)

ANTH 230: Peoples of the Northwest Coast - A, SO

A survey of the ways of life of the native peoples of coastal Washington, British Columbia, and Southeastern Alaska from European contact to contemporary times, including traditional methods of fishing, arts, potlatches, status systems, and wealth and their impact on the modern life of the region. (2)

ANTH 287: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 288: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 289: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

ANTH 305: Exploring Anthropology - Conceptual and Procedural Approaches

Exploration of how humans, culture, and society are understood and studied anthropologically. Students will learn anthropological concepts and approaches associated with the four sub-disciplines, procedures for conducting anthropological projects, qualitative and quantitative analyses, and anthropological ethics. Prerequisites: ANTH 102, at least one more anthropology course, or consent of instructor. (4)

ANTH 330: Cultures and Peoples of Native North America - A, SO

A comparative study of Native North American cultures from their arrival on the continent through today. Examination of U.S. and Canadian laws, policies, and conflicts, issues of sovereignty, and religious rights. (4)

ANTH 332: Prehistory of North America - SO

An archaeological reconstruction of economic, social, political, and religious life in North America from the time the first settlers entered the continent during the Ice Ages to the Mound Builders of later times and ultimately to the first contact with European settlers. (4)

ANTH 334: The Anthropology of Contemporary America - A, SO

An investigation of American social patterns and problems designed to give insights from a cross-cultural perspective; exploration of American solutions to common human problems; a determination of what is unique about the "American Way." (4)

ANTH 335: The Aztecs, Mayans and Their Predecessors - C, SO

This course is an archaeological and ethnohistoric survey of the emergence and nature of complex societies in ancient Mesoamerica. Besides the Aztecs and Mayans, other fascinating cultures of study include the Olmecs, Teotihaucanos, and the Toltecs. Emphasis is placed on how these Meosamerican societies were structured and how they changed over time. (4)

ANTH 336: Peoples of Latin America - C, SO

Millions of Americans have never been north of the equator. Who are these "other" Americans? This survey course familiarizes the student with a broad range of Latin American peoples and problems. Topics range from visions of the supernatural to problems of economic development. (4)

ANTH 337: Culture and Prehistory of Central Mexico - C, SO

This course is an in-country examination of the rich past and present cultural variation of Central Mexico. It is structured around discussions and lectures in various modern venues and the impressive archaeological remains in Mexico City, and the states of Morelos, and Oaxaca. (4)

ANTH 338: Jewish Culture - A, SO

An exploration of American Jewish culture through its roots in the lifeways of Eastern European Ashkenazic Jews and its transformation in the United States. Emphasis on Jewish history, religion, literature, music, and humor as reflections of basic Jewish cultural themes. (4)

ANTH 340: The Anthropology of Africa - C, SO

Study of Africa's diverse cultures. Focus on early studies of villages and topics such as kinship, religion, and social structure, and on more recent studies of urban centers, the impact of colonialism, popular culture, and post-colonial politics. (4)

ANTH 342: Pacific Island Cultures - C, SO

Peoples of Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia. Developments in the Pacific region are explored, including economic development, migration, environmental degradation, political movements, gender roles, the impact of Western media, tourism, and cultural revivalism. How shifting theoretical models have informed the representation of Pacific cultures will also be considered. (4)

ANTH 343: East Asian Cultures - C, SO

A survey of the cultures and peoples of Eastern Asia, concentrating on China but with comparative reference to Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Cultural similarities as well as differences between these nations are stressed. Topics include religion, art, politics, history, kinship, and economics. (4)

ANTH 345: Contemporary China - C, SO

An immersion into the culture and society of the People's Republic of China; contemporary politics, kinship, folk religion, human relations; problems and prospects of development and rapid social change. (4)

ANTH 350: Women and Men in World Cultures - C, SO

An overview of the variation of sex roles and behaviors throughout the world; theories of matriarchy, patriarchy, mother goddesses, innate inequalities; marriage patterns, impact of European patterns; egalitarianism to feminism. (4)

ANTH 352: The Anthropology of Age - C, SO

This course examines the broad diversity of how cultures define the behavioral strategies of people as they age, how aging differentially is experienced by men and women, and how intergenerational family relationships change as individuals make transitions between life stages. Global issues of health, development, and human rights are considered. (4)

ANTH 360: Ethnic Groups - A, SO

Examines the nature of ethnic groups in America and abroad; the varying bases of ethnicity (culture, religion, tribe, "race," etc.); problems of group identity and boundary maintenance; ethnic symbols; ethnic politics; ethnic neighborhoods; and ethnic humor. (4)

ANTH 365: Prehistoric Environment and Technology: Lab Methods in Archaeology - SO

Laboratory interpretation of archaeological materials. Techniques used in interpreting past human ecology, technology, and economy. Analytical procedures for bone, stone, ceramic, and metal artifacts; analysis of debris from food processing activities. Analysis of materials from archaeological sites. (1 to 4)

ANTH 368: Edible Landscapes, The Foraging Spectrum - C, SO

The course examines foragers in Africa, North America, and Australia. Using classic ethnographic literature, it provides a cultural ecological perspective of foraging societies in a variety of environments. It also examines how foraging studies inform archaeological research, and the challenges that these peoples now face in a rapidly changing world. (4)

ANTH 370: The Archaeology of Ancient Empires - C, SO

The origins of agriculture, writing, cities, and the state in many parts of the world, comparing and contrasting the great civilizations of antiquity, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, Asia, Mesoamerica, and South America. (4)

ANTH 376: Nation, State, and Citizen - C, SO

How did "the nation" come to be the dominant legitimization of "the state"? What technologies of power are contemporary states based on? How do states define their ideal citizens and citizens reshape their state? Specific topics may include refugees, transnational identities, colonialism, and neo-liberalism. (4)

ANTH 380: Sickness, Madness and Health - C, SO

A cross-cultural examination of systems of curing practices and cultural views of physical and mental health; prevention and healing; nature and skills of curers; definitions of disease; variation in diseases; impact of modern medical and psychological practitioners. (4)

ANTH 385: Marriage, Family and Kinship - C, SO

Explores the nature of domestic groups cross-culturally, including the ways in which religion, myth, magic, and folklore serve to articulate and control domestic life; how changing systems of production affect marriage and domestic forms; and how class and gender systems intertwine with kinship, domestic forms, and the meaning of "family." (4)

ANTH 387: Special Topics in Anthropology - SO

Selected topics as announced by the department. Course will address important issues in archaeology and cultural anthropology. (1 to 4)

ANTH 388: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 389: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 392: Gods, Magic and Morals - C, SO

Anthropology of religion; humanity's concepts of and relationships to the supernatural; examination of personal and group functions that religions fulfill; exploration of religions both "primitive" and historical; origins of religion. Cross-listed with RELI 392. (4)

ANTH 465: Archaeology: The Field Experience - SO

Excavation of a historic or prehistoric archaeological site, with emphasis on basic excavation skills and record keeping, field mapping, drafting, and photography. The laboratory covers artifact processing and preliminary analysis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (1 to 8)

ANTH 480: Anthropological Inquiry

Historic and thematic study of the theoretical foundations of sociocultural anthropology; research methods; how theory and methods are used to establish anthropological knowledge. Required of majors in their junior or senior year. (4)

ANTH 487: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 488: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 489: Special Topics in Anthropology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ANTH 491: Independent Studies: Undergraduate Readings

Reading in specific areas or issues of anthropology under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: departmental consent. (1 to 4)

ANTH 492: Independent Studies: Undergraduate Fieldwork

Study of specific areas or issues in anthropology through field methods of analysis and research supported by appropriate reading under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: departmental consent. (1 to 4)

ANTH 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

ANTH 499: Capstone: Seminar in Anthropology - SR

Examine anthropological methods and apply anthropological theory to an investigation of a selected topic in contemporary anthropology. Required of majors in their junior or senior year. Prerequisite for non-majors: departmental approval. (4)