Catalog 2013-2014

Education

253.535.7272
www.plu.edu/education
educ@plu.edu

Quick Facts

http://www.plu.edu/education/quick-facts/home.php

Undergraduate Admissions

http://www.plu.edu/education/Admissions/Undergraduate%20Certification.php

B.A.E. - Elementary Education

http://www.plu.edu/education/Programs/BAE-Elementary-Education.php

B.A.E. - Secondary Education

http://www.plu.edu/education/Programs/BAE-Secondary%20Education.php

B.A.E. - Outreach Education

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION (B.A.E.) DEGREE
Major in Education
43-54 semester hours depending on specific program
Eligibility Requirements for Admission to B.A.E. Program

All individuals seeking to enter an undergraduate degree program must apply to the department. A completed application must be submitted to the department by the first Friday in March for Fall Term admission.

A completed application will include the following requirements:

  • Evidence of verbal and quantitative ability as illustrated by a passing score on each of the three sections of the Washington Educators Skills Test Basic (WEST-B). Test dates are available during the year; check http://www.west.nesinc.com for the dates and to register.
  • Official transcripts of all college/university work (must be from a regionally accredited college/university; foreign transcripts must have a professional evaluation for regional university equivalency)
  • Junior standing (60 or more semester hours)
  • Cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.75
  • Psychology 101 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher
  • Writing 101 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher
  • MATH 123 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher must be taken prior to admission to the Elementary Education program in the Department of Education.
  • Two letters of recommendation: one academic/professional reference and one that speaks to the candidate’s work with young people
  • Essay of 500-750 words identifying and discussing three values that will guide your educational practice.
  • Interview
  • Application forms and procedures for admission to professional studies in education are available on the department’s website www.plu.edu/education/Admissions/home.php
  • The admission criteria will be used to assess the student's academic and professional readiness.

Continuation in a program of study in the department is subject to continuous assessment of student development and performance. Candidates are required to demonstrate the mastery of knowledge, skills, professionalism, attitudes, and dispositions required for effective practice. Records will be reviewed at the end of each semester to ensure candidates are meeting standards throughout the program.

Degree Requirements
  • All coursework is completed with a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or above and the student’s degree has been posted.
  • All coursework used to fulfill education program requirements as part of an academic major, minor, emphasis, or endorsement have been completed with a C grade or better.
  • All coursework designated by EDUC, SPED, or EPSY have been completed with a B- grade or better.
  • All additional courses related to and required for education programs and teacher certification have been completed with a grade of C or better. For elementary education candidates these include: MATH 123 or equivalent; MATH 124 or equivalent; life science; physical science; KINS 322 or equivalent; ARTD 340 or equivalent; and MUSI 341 or equivalent.
  • Passage of the WEST-E in at least one endorsement area.

NOTE: Each endorsement requires passing the designated WEST-E (and ACTFL if pursuing World Languages).

The WEST-E (and ACTFL if necessary) must be taken and passed prior to student teaching.

Eligibility for Certification

Candidates become eligible for certification when they have met the requirements for a B.A.E. and passed the Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) required by the state of Washington and scored by Pearson. The B.A.E. requirements are separate from the teacher certification. Though they may lead to teacher certification, the student must complete the edTPA in order to be eligible to earn the B.A.E.

Residency Teaching Certificate

Candidates who successfully complete a program of professional studies in the department, who meet all related academic requirements for a degree or a certificate, and who meet all state requirements will be recommended by the department for a Washington State residency teaching certificate. Additional state requirements include a minimum age of 18, good moral character and personal fitness as evidenced by completion of state Character and Fitness Supplement and Washington State Patrol/FBI background check via fingerprint clearance, assessment by means of passing scores on WEST-B, WEST-E/ACTFL exams, and completion of state certification application and payment of state certification fee. Information regarding all state requirements and procedures for certification is available from the Certification Officer in the department. State requirements are subject to immediate change. Candidates should meet with department advisors each semester and the Certification Officer for updates in program or application requirements.

Note: The department will make every reasonable attempt to obtain and distribute the most current information regarding Washington State certification requirements, but cannot guarantee that state requirements will remain unchanged.

ELEMENTARY CERTIFICATION AND ENDORSEMENT OPTIONS

The basic undergraduate elementary education program consists of a four-term program starting in the Fall Term of each year.

Elementary Professional Education Sequence
51 semester hours

MATH 123 must be taken prior to admission to the program MATH 124 is recommended to be taken prior to admission and must be completed before the end of Semester II. Candidates must also complete ARTD 340, MUSI 341, KINS 322, a life science, and a physical science prior to program completion.

First Year: Fall Semester I
11 semester hours
  • EDUC 390: Inquiry into Learning I: Investigation into Learning and Development (4)
  • EDUC 392: Inquiry into Learning II: Investigation into Learning and Development (4)
  • EDUC 394: Technology and Teaching (2)
  • EDUC 320: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
First Year: Spring Semester II
16 semester hours
  • EDUC 408: Literacy in a K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 410: Science/Health in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 424: Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse Learners (4)
  • SPED 424: Learners with Special Needs in the General Education Classroom (4)

Note: MATH 124: Modern Elementary Math II must be taken by end of Semester II.

Second Year: Fall Semester III
12 semester hours
  • EDUC 406: Mathematics in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 412: Social Studies in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 425: Inquiry into Teaching II: Diverse Learners (4)

Passing scores on the WEST-E endorsement test for elementary education must be presented before a student can start in Term III. If pursuing a second endorsement, candidates must also submit passing scores on the WEST-E in the second endorsement area prior to enrolling in Term IV. If pursuing a world language as a second endorsement, candidates must also submit passing scores of at least advanced low on the ACTFL Oral and Written Proficiency Exams prior to enrolling in Term IV.

Second Year: Spring Semester IV
12 semester hours
  • EDUC 430: Student Teaching in K-8 Education (10)
  • EDUC 450: Inquiry into Learning and Teaching: Reflective Practice and Seminar (2)
Dual Elementary and Special Education Professional Education Sequence
74 semester hours

In this teacher certification program candidates pursue an endorsement in special education (P-12) and elementary education while earning a B.A.E. degree.

The students are encouraged to take following courses prior to admission to the program:

  • MATH 123 or equivalent
  • MATH 124 or equivalent
  • ARTD 340 or equivalent
  • KINS 322 or equivalent
  • Life Science
  • Physical Science
First Year: Fall Semester I
13 semester hours
  • EDUC 390: Inquiry into Learning I: Investigation into Learning and Development (4)
  • EDUC 392: Inquiry into Learning II: Investigation into Learning and Development (4)
  • EDUC 394: Technology and Teaching (2)
  • EDUC 320: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
  • SPED 315: Assessment and Evaluation in Special Education (2)
First Year: J-Term I
4 semester hours
  • SPED 404: Communication and Collaboration (2)
  • SPED 450: Early Childhood Special Education (2)
First Year: Spring Semester II
16 semester hours
  • EDUC 410: Science/Health in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 408: Literacy in a K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 424: Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse Learners (4)
  • SPED 424: Learners with Special Needs in the General Education Classroom (4)
First Year: Summer
3 semester hours
  • SPED 322: Moderate Disabilities and Transitions (3)
Second Year: Fall Semester III
17 semester hours
  • EDUC 406: Mathematics in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 412: Social Studies in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 425: Inquiry into Teaching II: Diverse Learners (4)
  • SPED 430: Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (3)
  • SPED 431: Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (2)
Second Year: J-Term II
6 semester hours
  • SPED 442: Technology in Special Education (2)
  • SPED 454: Students with Physical Challenges (2)
  • MUSI 341: Music for Classroom Teachers (2)

Passing scores on the WEST-E endorsement tests for elementary education and special education must be presented before a student can enroll in Term IV.

Second Year: Spring Semester IV
15 semester hours
  • EDUC 434: Student Teaching – Elementary (Dual) (6)
  • SPED 459: Student Teaching in Special Education (6)
  • EDUC 450: Inquiry into Learning and Teaching: Reflective Practice Seminar (2)
  • SPED 460: Special Education Student Teaching Seminar: Issues in Practice (1)

The Professional Education sequence forms the foundation of the program for all candidates seeking certification as an elementary education (K-8) multi-subject teacher. Undergraduate candidates have several options for building a program upon the professional education sequence, including:
  • They may earn a residency teaching certificate and elementary K-8 endorsement. This requires the completion of the professional education sequence for elementary education, 20 semester hour academic emphasis area and passing scores on the TPA.
  • They may earn a residency teaching certificate with elementary K-8 and P-12 special education endorsements. This requires the completion of the professional education sequence for elementary education candidates and the completion of coursework required for endorsement in special education and passing scores on the edTPA.

Note: Information about all state endorsements can be obtained online at www.plu.edu/education and from the assistant director of admission and advising in the School of Education and Kinesiology.

Candidates pursuing a residency teaching certificate and an elementary K-8 endorsement must also complete a 20 semester hour academic emphasis. In some cases, emphasis areas may be pursued as a second endorsement through the completion of additional coursework, passing the WEST-E, passing the ACTFL (if pursuing a world language) and completing student teaching. All exams (WEST-E and if pursuing a world language, ACTFL) must be completed prior to student teaching. The number of endorsements that can be pursued in the B.A.E. certification is two, the only exception being the combination of elementary education/early childhood education/early childhood special education.

EMPHASIS AREAS FOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJORS

www.plu.edu/education/Teacher%20Endorsements/home.php

Elementary Education/Early Childhood Education/Early Childhood Special Education Professional Education Sequence
73 semester hours
This program offers candidates an option of completing the requirements of the Early Childhood Education/Early Childhood Special Education (P-3) endorsement program concurrently with the requirements for the Elementary Education Teacher Education Program. Coursework would be offered concurrent with elementary education program coursework. Successful completion of all coursework along with passing scores on the edTPA will allow the candidate to have additional endorsements on the Washington State residency teaching certificate.

Entering candidates who have an Early Childhood Education AA-DTA degree or equivalent from an accredited institution could be awarded up to 6 semester hours of the ECE/ECSE endorsement program based on transcript review and earning a 3.00 grade point average in early childhood coursework taken during the candidate’s first term at PLU.

Students are encouraged to take the following courses prior to admission to the program:

  • MATH 123 or equivalent
  • MATH 124 or equivalent
  • ARTD 340 or equivalent
  • KINS 322 or equivalent
  • Life Science
  • Physical Science
First Year: Fall Semester I
15 semester hours
  • EDUC 390: Inquiry into Learning I: Investigation into Learning and Development (4)
  • EDUC 392: Inquiry into Learning II: Investigation into Learning and Development (4)
  • EDUC 394: Technology and Teaching (2)
  • EDUC 320: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
  • EDUC 414: Foundations in ECE/ECSE (4)
First Year: J-Term I
4 semester hours
  • SPED 450: Early Childhood Special Education (2)
  • EDUC 416: Assessment in Early Childhood (2)
First Year: Spring Semester II
16 semester hours
  • EDUC 410: Science/Health in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 408: Literacy in a K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 424: Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse Learners (4)
  • SPED 424: Learners with Special Needs in the General Education Classroom (4)
Second Year: Summer
7 semester hours
  • EDUC/SPED 419: Child Guidance & Positive Behavior Support (3)
  • EDUC 417: Curriculum, Instructional Strategies, and Progress Monitoring (4)
Second Year: Fall Semester III
15 semester hours
  • EDUC 406: Mathematics in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 412: Social Studies in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 425: Inquiry into Teaching II: Diverse Learners (4)
  • EDUC 415: Working with Families of Young Children (3)

Passing scores on the WEST-E endorsement tests for elementary education, early childhood education, and early childhood special education must be before a student can start in Term III. One of these tests may be taken for the first time during Term III.

Second Year: Spring Semester IV
16 semester hours
  • EDUC 430: Student Teaching in K-8 Education (10)
  • EDUC/SPED 458: Student Teaching in Early Childhood Education/Early Childhood Special Education (3)
  • EDUC 450: Inquiry into Learning and Teaching: Reflective Practice Seminar (2)
  • SPED 460: Special Education Student Teaching Seminar: Issues in Practice (1)
Elementary/Reading Professional Education Sequence

MATH 123 must be taken prior to admission to the program MATH 124 is recommended to be taken prior to admission and must be completed before the end of Semester II.

Candidates must also complete ARTD 340, MUSI 341, PHED 322, a life science, and a physical science prior to program completion.

First Year: Fall Semester I
11 semester hours
  • EDUC 390: Inquiry into Learning I: Investigation into Learning and Development (4)
  • EDUC 392: Inquiry into Learning II: Investigation into Learning and Development (4)
  • EDUC 394: Technology and Teaching (2)
  • EDUC 320: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
First Year: J-Term I
4 semester hours
  • EDUC 428: Children’s Literature in K-8 Curriculum (2)
  • EDUC 429: Adolescent Literature in Secondary Curriculum (2)
First Year: Spring Semester II
16 semester hours
  • EDUC 410: Science/Health in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 408: Literacy in a K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 424: Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse Learners (4)
  • SPED 424: Learners with Special Needs in the General Education Classroom (4)

NOTE: MATH 124: Modern Elementary Math II must be taken by end of Semester II.

Second Year: Summer I
12 semester hours
  • EDUC 411: Strategies for Language & Literacy Development (4)
  • EDUC 413: Language & Literacy Development: Assessment & Instruction (4)
  • EDUC 431: Children’s Writing (2)
  • EDUC 490: Acquisition & Development of Language (2)
Second Year: Fall Semester III
16 semester hours
  • EDUC 406: Mathematics in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 412: Social Studies in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 425: Inquiry into Teaching II: Diverse Learners (4)
  • EDUC 438: Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction K-12 (4)

Passing scores on the WEST-E endorsement test for elementary education must be presented before a student can enroll in Term IV. If pursuing reading as a second endorsement, candidates must also submit passing scores on the WEST-E in reading prior to enrolling in Term IV.

Second Year: Spring Semester IV
12 semester hours
  • EDUC 430: Student Teaching in K-8 Education (10)
  • EDUC 450: Inquiry into Learning and Teaching: Reflective Practice and Seminar (2)
EMPHASIS AREAS

 
Candidates in the elementary education program must select an area of emphasis. The courses listed for each content area are required if the emphasis will be pursued as a second endorsement. If candidates pursue only the emphasis, she/he may choose any courses from the list that equal or a minimum of 20 semester hours for candidates entering the B.A.E. program in Fall 2012 and beyond.

Biology
  • BIOL 225: Molecules, Cells, and Organisms (4)
  • BIOL 226: Genes, Evolution, Diversity, and Ecology (4)
  • BIOL 354: Natural History of Vertebrates (4)
  • BIOL 462: Plant Diversity and Distribution (4)
  • CHEM 115: General Chemistry I (4)
  • MATH 140: Analytic Geometry and Functions (4)
Chemistry
  • CHEM 115: General Chemistry I with lab (4)
  • CHEM 116: General Chemistry II with lab (4)
  • CHEM 331 & 333: Organic Chemistry I with lab (5)
  • CHEM 332 & 334: Organic Chemistry II with lab (5)
  • MATH 140: Analytic Geometry and Functions (4)
  • PHYS 125 & 135: College Physics I with lab (5)
Chinese
  • CHIN 101: Elementary Chinese (4)
  • CHIN 102: Elementary Chinese (4)
  • CHIN 201: Intermediate Chinese (4)
  • CHIN 202: Intermediate Chinese (4)
  • CHIN 371: Chinese Literature in Translation (4)
  • EDUC 850: Acquisition Language Development
  • EDUC 851: Methods and Leadership: Differentiating Instruction
Earth and Space Science
  • GEOS 102: General Oceanography (4)
  • GEOS 105: Meteorology (4)
  • GEOS 201: Geologic Principles (4)
  • PHYS 110: Astronomy (4)
  • GEOS 103: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Geological Hazards (4)
  • GEOS 104: Conservation of Natural Resources (4)
English Language Arts
  • ENGL 241: American Traditions in Literature (4)
  • ENGL 251: British Traditions in Literature (4)
  • ENGL 328: Theories of Reading & Writing (4)
  • ENGL 393: The English Language (4)
  • EDUC 428: Children’s Literature in K-8 (2)
  • EDUC 429: Adolescent Literature in Secondary (2)
  • COMA 212: Public Speaking (2)
  • COMA 213: Communication Writing (2)
English Language Learners (Taught in summer through Professional Partnerships and Development)
  • EDUC 850: Acquisition Language Development (2)
  • EDUC 851: Methods and Leadership: Differentiating Instruction (4)
  • EDUC 852: Reading and Writing: Literacy Development (3)
  • EDUC 853: English Structure: Knowledge of Language Systems (3)
  • EDUC 854: Listening and Speaking: Oral Proficiency Development (3)
  • EDUC 855: Assessment: Issues, Instruments, and Methods (2)
  • EDUC 856: Cross-Cultural Issues: Language, Culture, Teaching, and Learning (1)
  • EDUC 205: Multicultural Perspectives in the Classroom (4)
  • ENGL 328: Theories of Reading and Writing (4)
French
  • FREN 101: Elementary French (4)
  • FREN 102: Elementary French (4)
  • FREN 201: Intermediate French (4)
  • FREN 202: Intermediate French (4)
  • FREN 321: Civilization and Culture (4)
  • EDUC 850: Acquisition Language Development (2)
  • EDUC 851: Methods and Leadership: Differentiating Instruction (4)
German
  • GERM 101: Elementary German I (4)
  • GERM 102: Elementary German II (4)
  • GERM 201: Intermediate German I (4)
  • GERM 202: Intermediate German II (4)
  • GERM 321: German Civilization to 1750 (4) or GERM 322: German Civilization Since 1750 (4)
  • EDUC 850: Acquisition Language Development
  • EDUC 851: Methods and Leadership: Differentiating Instruction
Health & Fitness 

May only be pursued as an emphasis. A B.A.K. with Certification and endorsement in Health and Fitness Education can be pursued through the Department of Kinesiology.

  • KINS 279: Teaching Physical Activity (2)
  • KINS 293: Teaching Methods: Fitness Activities (2)
  • KINS 320: Nutrition, Health & Performance (4)
  • KINS 322: Elementary Physical Education (2)
  • KINS 326: Adapted Physical Activity (4)
  • KINS 366: Health Psychology (4)
  • KINS 395: Comprehensive School Health (4)
  • KINS 425: Health Promotion/Wellness Intervention (2)
History
  • ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics (4)
  • HIST 107/108: History of Western Civilization I (4)
  • HIST 251/252/253: American History (4)
  • HIST 335/337/338/339/340/344: Non-Western History (4)
  • HIST 460: History of the Western and Pacific Northwestern US (4)
  • POLS 151: American Government (4)
Mathematics
  • MATH 151: Introduction to Calculus (4)
  • MATH 152: Calculus II (4)
  • MATH 203: History of Mathematics (4)
  • MATH 317: Introduction to Proof in Mathematics (4)
  • MATH 321: Geometry (4)
  • MATH 341: Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (4)
Middle-Level Humanities
  • COMA 212: Public Speaking (2)
  • ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics (4)
  • ENGL 328: Theories of Reading and Writing (4)
  • HIST 251/252/253: American History (4)
  • HIST 335/337/338/339/340/344: Non-Western History (4)
  • HIST 460: History of the Western and Pacific Northwestern US (4)
  • POLS 151: American Government (4)
Middle-Level Mathematics
  • MATH 123: Modern Elementary Mathematics (4)
  • MATH 151: Introduction to Calculus (4)
  • MATH 152: Calculus II (4)
  • MATH 203: History of Mathematics (4)
  • MATH 317: Introduction to Proof in Mathematics (4)
  • MATH 242: Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (4)
  • MATH 321: Geometry (4)
Middle-Level Science
  • BIOL 225: Molecules, Cells, and Organisms (4)
  • CHEM 115: General Chemistry with lab (4)
  • GEOS 103: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Geologic Hazards (4)
  • GEOS 104: Conservation of Natural Resources (4)
  • MATH 140: Precalculus (4)
  • PHYS 110: Astronomy (4)
  • PHYS 125 & 135: College Physics I with lab (5)
Music

May only be pursued as an emphasis. A B.M.E can be pursued through the Department of Music.

  • MUSI 120A/B: Music and Culture (4)
  • MUSI 115: Introduction to Keyboarding (1)
  • MUSI 124: Theory I (3)
  • MUSI 125: Ear Training I (1)
  • MUSI 126: Ear Training II (1)
  • One of the following:
    • MUSI 101: Introduction to Music (4)
    • MUSI 103: History of Jazz (4)
    • MUSI 104: Music and Technology (4)
    • MUSI 105: The Arts of China (4)
    • MUSI 106: Music of Scandinavia (4)
  • Private Instruction: MUSI 202-219 (4)
  • Performance MUSI 360-383 (4)
  • Music Electives (2)
Physics
  • MATH 151: Introduction to Calculus (4)
  • MATH 152: Calculus II (4)
  • MATH 253: Multivariable Calculus (4)
  • PHYS 125 & 135: College Physics I with lab (5)
  • PHYS 126 & 136: College Physics II with lab (5)
  • PHYS 223: Elementary Modern Physics (4)
Science
  • BIOL 225: Molecules, Cells and Organisms (4)
  • CHEM 115: General Chemistry I with lab (4)
  • GEOS 103: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, & Geologic Hazards(4)
  • GEOS 104: Conservation of Natural Resources (4)
  • MATH 140: Precalculus (4)
  • PHYS 110: Astronomy (4)
  • PHYS 125 & 135: College Physics I with lab (5)
Social Studies
  • ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics (4)
  • HIST 460: History of the Western and Pacific Northwestern U.S. (4)
  • HIST 251/252/253: American History (4)
  • HIST 107/108: History of Western Civilizations I & II (4)
  • HIST 335/337/338/339/340/344: Non-Western History (4)
  • POLS 151: American Government (4)
  • SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology (4)
Spanish
  • HISP 101: Elementary Spanish (4)
  • HISP 102: Elementary Spanish (4)
  • HISP 201: Intermediate Spanish (4)
  • HISP 202: Intermediate Spanish (4)
  • HISP 301/321/322/341: Culture (4)
  • HISP 325/421/422/431/432/441: Literature (4)
  • EDUC 850: Acquisition Language Development
  • EDUC 851: Methods and Leadership: Differentiating Instruction
Theater Arts
  • COMA 212: Public Speaking (4)
  • DANC 170: Introduction to Dance (4)
  • ENGL 301: Shakespeare (4)
  • THEA 160: Introduction to Theatre (4)
  • THEA 250: Acting I: Fundamentals (4)
  • THEA 255: Stage Technology (4)
  • THEA 360: Theatre History I (4)
Visual Arts
  • ARTD 101: Drawing 1 (4)
  • ARTD 110: Graphic Design 1 (4)
  • ARTD 180/181: History of Western Art (4)
  • ARTD 220: Photography 1: BW Photography (4)
  • ARTD 250: Sculpture 1 (4)
  • ARTD 365: Painting 1 (4)
  • ARTD 380: Modern Art (4)
SECONDARY CERTIFICATION AND ENDORSEMENT OPTIONS

All undergraduate candidates seeking the path that leads to secondary certification in a content area (except those seeking certification in music and health/fitness education) are required to complete the following four-term program of study.

Professional Education Sequence
43 semester hours
First Year: Semester I
11 semester hours
  • EDUC 320: Issues of Child Abuse & Neglect (1)
  • EDUC 390: Inquiry into Learning I: Investigation into Learning and Development (4)
  • EDUC 392: Inquiry into Learning II: Investigation into Learning and Development (4)
  • EDUC 394: Technology and Teaching: Laboratory (2)
First Year: Semester II
12 semester hours
  • EDUC 424: Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse Learners (4)
  • EPSY 368: Educational Psychology (4)
  • SPED 424: Learners with Special Needs in the General Education Classroom (4)
Second Year: Semester III
8 semester hours
  • EDUC 425: Inquiry into Teaching II: Diverse Learners (4)
  • One course from EDUC 440 to 449 (4)

Candidates must present passing scores on the WEST-E endorsement tests for the secondary endorsement being pursued before starting in Term III. If the endorsement is a world language, the candidate must also provide passing scores on the ACTFL.

Second Year: Semester IV
12 semester hours
  • EDUC 468: Student Teaching -Secondary (10)
  • EDUC 450: Inquiry into Learning and Teaching: Reflective Practice and Seminar Education (2)
Secondary and Special Education Professional Education Sequence
50 semester hours

An undergraduate student who is pursuing a B.A.E. degree in Secondary Education also has the option of earning a Special Education (P-12) endorsement by complete the following Special Education course sequence. Must have another endorsement in addition to Special Education (SPED).

First Year: Fall Semester I
13 semester hours
  • EDUC 390: Inquiry into Learning I: Investigation into Learning and Development (4)
  • EDUC 392: Inquiry into Learning II: Investigation into Learning and Development (4)
  • EDUC 394: Technology and Teaching: Laboratory (2)
  • EDUC 320: Issues of Child Abuse & Neglect (1)
  • SPED 315: Assessment and Evaluation in Special Education (2)
First Year: J-Term I
5 semester hours
  • SPED 404: Communication and Collaboration (2)
  • SPED 442: Technology in Special Education (2)
First Year: Spring Semester II
12 semester hours
  • EDUC 424: Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse Learners (4)
  • EPSY 368: Educational Psychology (4)
  • SPED 424: Learners with Special Needs in the General Education Classroom (4)
Second Year: Summer Session
3 semester hours
  • SPED 322: Moderate Disabilities and Transitions (3)
Second Year: Fall Semester III
13 semester hours
  • EDUC 425: Inquiry into Teaching II: Diverse Learners (4)
  • One course from EDUC 440 to 449 (4)
  • SPED 430: Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (3)
  • SPED 431: Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (2)
Second Year: J Term
4 semester hours
  • SPED 450: Early Childhood Special Education (2)
  • SPED 454: Students with Physical Challenges (2)

Candidates must present passing scores on the WEST-E endorsement tests for the secondary endorsement and special education being pursued before enrolling in Term IV. If the endorsement is a world language, the candidate must also provide passing scores on the ACTFL.

Second Year: Spring Semester IV
15 semester hours
  • EDUC 466: Student Teaching -Secondary (Dual) (7)
  • SPED 459: Student Teaching in Secondary School (5)
  • EDUC 450: Inquiry into Learning and Teaching: Reflective Practice Seminar (2)
  • SPED 460: Special Education Student Teaching Seminar: Issues in Practice (1)

The professional education sequence forms the foundation of the program for all candidates seeking certification in a content area (except music and physical education candidates). Undergraduate candidates seeking certification/ endorsement in a content area (usually to teach in grades 5-12) have several options for building a program upon the professional education sequence, including:

  • They may earn a residency teaching certificate with an endorsement in secondary level content area. This requires the completion of the professional education sequence for secondary education candidates and a teaching or academic major that meets state endorsement requirements and earning passing scores on the edTPA. 
  • They may earn a residency teaching certificate with an endorsement in secondary level content area and an endorsement in special education. This requires the completion of the professional education sequence for secondary education candidates, a teaching or academic major and coursework required for endorsement in special education and earning passing scores on the edTPA.
  • Certification in Music or Health and Fitness Education: Undergraduates have the option of completing programs that lead to a bachelor’s degree in music education or health/fitness education with certification. All individuals seeking a Bachelor of Music Education or a Bachelor of Arts in Kinesiology with Certification must apply and be accepted into the School of Education and Kinesiology. They must also complete the following courses:
    • Music Education majors must complete EDUC 391 (offered every fall), EPSY 361 (offered every spring), EDUC 320, and all other course requirements specified by the Department of Music.
  • Physical Science Education majors must complete: EDUC 390, EDUC 392, EDUC 320, and all other requirements specified by the Department of Kinesiology.
  • Note: Secondary teaching majors are designed to align with state endorsement requirements and to meet specific departmental standards for majors and minors. Course and hour requirements for teaching and/or academic majors vary.
Biology (grades 5-12)
  • BIOL 225: Molecules, Cells, and Organisms (4)
  • BIOL 226: Genes, Evolution, Diversity, and Ecology (4)
  • BIOL 462: Plant Diversity and Distribution (4)
  • MATH 140: Precalculus (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • BIOL 328: Microbiology (4)
    • BIOL 348: Advanced Cell Biology (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • BIOL 332: Genetics (4)
    • BIOL 407: Molecular Biology (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • BIOL 424: Ecology (4)
    • BIOL 475: Evolution (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • BIOL 324: Natural History of Vertebrates (4)
    • BIOL 325: Invertebrate Zoology (4)
    • BIOL 361: Comparative Anatomy (4)
    • BIOL 441: Mammalian Physiology (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • CHEM 105: Chemistry of Life (4)
    • CHEM 115: General Chemistry I (4)
    • Four credits of BIOL elective
Chemistry (grades 5-12)
  • CHEM 115: General Chemistry I (4)
  • CHEM 116: General Chemistry II (4)
  • CHEM 331: Organic Chemistry I (4)
  • CHEM 332: Organic Chemistry II (4)
  • CHEM 333: Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (1)
  • CHEM 334: Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (1)
  • CHEM 320: Analytical Chemistry (4)
  • CHEM 341: Physical Chemistry (4)
  • CHEM 342: Physical Chemistry (4)
  • CHEM 343: Physical Chemistry Laboratory (1)
  • CHEM 344: Physical Chemistry Laboratory (1)
  • CHEM 403: Biochemistry (4)
  • PHYS 153: General Physics I (4)
  • PHYS 154: General Physics II (4)
  • PHYS 163: General Physics I Laboratory (1)
  • PHYS 164: General Physics II Laboratory (1)
  • MATH 151: Introduction to Calculus (4)
Chinese (grades P-12)
  • CHIN 101: Elementary Chinese (4)
  • CHIN 102: Elementary Chinese (4)
  • CHIN 201: Intermediate Chinese (4)
  • CHIN 202: Intermediate Chinese (4)
  • CHIN 301: Composition and Conversation I (4)
  • CHIN 302: Composition and Conversation II (4)
  • CHIN 371: Chinese Literature in Translation (4)
  • EDUC 850: Acquisition Language Development
  • EDUC 851: Methods and Leadership: Differentiating Instruction
Earth and Space Science (grades 5-12)
  • GEOS 102: General Oceanography (4)
  • GEOS 104: Conservation of Natural Resources (4)
  • GEOS 105: Meteorology (4)
  • GEOS 201: Geologic Principles (4)
  • PHYS 110: Astronomy (4)
  • PHYS 125: College Physics I (4)
  • PHYS 136: College Physics II (4)
  • PHYS 135: College Physics I Laboratory (1)
  • PHYS 136: College Physics II Laboratory (1)
  • MATH 140: Precalculus (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • BIOL 111: Biology and the Modern World (4)
    • BIOL 116: Introductory Ecology (4)
    • BIOL 225: Molecules, Cells, and Organisms (4)
    • BIOL 226: Genes, Evolution, Diversity, and Ecology (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • CHEM 104: Environmental Chemistry (4)
    • CHEM 115: General Chemistry (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • GEOS 103: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Geologic Hazards (4)
    • GEOS 107: Global Climate Change (4)
    • GEOS 109: The Geology of Energy (4)
    • GEOS 324: Igneous Petrology (2)
    • GEOS 325: Structural Geology (4)
    • GEOS 326: Optical Mineralogy (2)
    • GEOS 327: Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (4)
    • GEOS 328: Paleontology (4)
    • COMA 212: Public Speaking (2)
English Language Arts (grades 5-12)
  • ENGL 241: American Traditions in Literature (4)
  • ENGL 251: British Traditions in Literature (4)
  • ENGL 301: Shakespeare (4)
  • ENGL 393: The English Language (4)
  • ENGL 328: Theories of Reading and Writing (4)
  • Choose one of the following: ENGL 232: Women’s Literature (4)
  • ENGL 341: Feminist Approaches to Literature (4)
  • ENGL 343: Post-Colonial Literature and Theory (4)
  • ENGL 342: American Ethnic Literatures (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
  • ENGL 216: Topics in Literature: Emphasis on Cross-Cultural Perspectives (4)
  • ENGL 217: Topics in Literature: Emphasis on Alternative Perspectives (4)
  • ENGL 233; Post-Colonial Literature (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • ENGL 221: Research and Writing (4)
    • ENGL 325: Personal Essay (4)
    • ENGL 326: Writing for Children (4)
    • ENGL 327: Intermediate Poetry Writing (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • THEA 250: Acting I: Fundamentals (4)
    • THEA 270: Dramatic Literature (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • COMA 213: Communication Writing (2)
    • COMA 312: Advanced Public Speaking (2)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • ENGL 333: Children’s Literature (4)
    • ENGL 334: Special Topics in Children’s Literature (4)
    • EDUC 428 & 429: Children’s Literature in the K-8 Curriculum (2) and Adolescent Literature in the Secondary Curriculum (2)
English Language Learners (grades P-12)
  • EDUC 850: Acquisition Language Development (2)
  • EDUC 851: Methods and Leadership: Differentiating Instruction (4)
  • EDUC 852: Reading and Writing: Literacy Development (3)
  • EDUC 853: English Structure: Knowledge of Language Systems (3)
  • EDUC 854: Listening and Speaking: Oral Proficiency Development (3)
  • EDUC 855: Assessment: Issues, Instruments, and Methods (2)
  • EDUC 856: Cross-Cultural Issues: Language, Culture, Teaching, and Learning (1)
  • EDUC 205: Multicultural Perspectives in the Classroom (4)
  • ENGL 328: Theories of Reading and Writing (4)
French (grades P-12)
  • FREN 101: Elementary French (4)
  • FREN 102: Elementary French (4)
  • FREN 201: Intermediate French (4)
  • FREN 202: Intermediate French (4)
  • FREN 301: Composition and Conversation II (4)
  • FREN 302: Composition and Conversation II (4)
  • FREN 321: Civilization and Culture (4)
  • EDUC 850: Acquisition Language Development (2)
  • EDUC 851: Methods and Leadership: Differentiating Instruction (4)
German (grades P-12)
  • GERM 101: Elementary German I (4)
  • GERM 102: Elementary German II (4)
  • GERM 201: Intermediate German I (4)
  • GERM 202: Intermediate German II (4)
  • GERM 301: Composition and Conversation I (4)
  • GERM 302: Composition and Conversation II (4)
  • GERM 321: German Civilization to 1750 (4)
  • EDUC 850: Acquisition Language Development (2)
  • EDUC 851: Methods and Leadership: Differentiating Instruction (4)
History (grades 5-12)
  • HIST 460: History of the Western and Northwestern US (4)
  • POLS 151: American Government (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • HIST 107: History of Western Civilizations (4)
    • HIST 108: History of Western Civilizations (4)
    • HIST 215: Modern World History (4)
  • Choose two of the following:
    • HIST 251: Colonial American History (4)
    • HIST 252: 19th Century American History (4)
    • HIST 253: 20th Century American History (4)
  • 8 semester hours from upper-division US/European History
  • 8 semester hours from upper-division Non-Western History
  • Choose one of the following:
    • ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics (4)
    • ECON 102: Principles of Macroeconomics (4)
Mathematics (grades 5-12)
  • MATH 151: Introduction to Calculus (4)
  • MATH 152: Calculus II (4)
  • MATH 203: History of Mathematics (4)
  • MATH 242: Introduction to Mathematics Statistics (4)
  • MATH 245: Discrete Mathematics (4)
  • MATH 253: Multivariable Calculus (4)
  • MATH 317: Introduction to Proof in Mathematics (4)
  • MATH 321: Geometry (4)
  • MATH 331: Linear Algebra (4)
  • MATH 242: Introduction to Mathematics Statistics (4)
  • MATH 433: Abstract Algebra (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • MATH 351: Differential Equations (4)
    • MATH 356: Numerical Analysis (4)
    • PHYS 153 & 163: General Physics I (4) and General Physics I Laboratory (1)

Middle-Level Humanities (grades 4-9)
  • ENGL 241: American Traditions in Literature (4)
  • ENGL 251: British Traditions in Literature (4)
  • ENGL 328: Theories of Reading and Writing (4)
  • HIST 460: History of the Western and Northwestern US (4)
  • COMA 212: Public Speaking (2)
  • POLS 151: American Government (4)
  • Choose two of the following:
  • HIST 251: Colonial American History (4)
  • HIST 252: 19th Century American History (4)
  • HIST 253: 20th Century American History (4)
  • Choose two of the following:
  • HIST 335: The History of the Caribbean (4)
  • HIST 337: The History of Mexico (4)
  • HIST 338: Modern China (4)
  • HIST 339: Revolutionary China (4)
  • HIST 340: Modern Japan (4)
  • HIST 344: The Andes in Latin American History (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
  • ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics (4)
  • ECON 102: Principles of Macroeconomics (4)
Middle-Level Mathematics (grades 4-9)
  • MATH 123: Modern Elementary Math I (4)
  • MATH 124: Modern Elementary Math II (4)
  • MATH 151: Introduction to Calculus (4)
  • MATH 152: Calculus II (4)
  • MATH 203: History of Mathematics (4)
  • MATH 242: Introduction to Mathematics Statistics (4)
  • MATH 245: Discrete Mathematics (4)
  • MATH 317: Introduction to Proof in Mathematics (4)
  • MATH 321: Geometry (4)
  • MATH 331: Linear Algebra (4)
Middle-Level Science (grades 4-9)
  • GEOS 102: General Oceanography (4)
  • GEOS 103: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Geologic Hazards (4)
  • GEOS 104: Conservation of Natural Resources (4)
  • BIOL 125: Molecules, Cells, and Organisms (4)
  • CHEM 115: General Chemistry with Lab (4)
  • PHYS 125 & 135: College Physics with Lab (5)
  • PHYS 110: Astronomy (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • GEOS 105: Meterology (4)
    • GEOS 201: Geologic Principles (4)
Physics (grades 5-12)
  • MATH 151: Introduction to Calculus (4)
  • MATH 152: Calculus II (4)
  • MATH 253: Multivariable Calculus (4)
  • PHYS 153 & 154: General Physics I with Lab (5)
  • PHYS 163 & 164: General Physics II with Lab (5)
  • PHYS 240: Engineering Statics (4)
  • PHYS 331: Electromagnetic Theory (4)
  • PHYS 336: Classical Mechanics (4)
  • PHYS 354: Mathematics Physics I (4)
Science (grades 5-12)
  • BIOL 125: Molecules, Cells, and Organisms (4)
  • CHEM 115: General Chemistry I (4)
  • GEOS 102: General Oceanography (4)
  • GEOS 103: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Geologic Hazards (4)
  • GEOS 104: Conservation of Natural Resources (4)
  • GEOS 105: Meterology (4)
  • GEOS 201: Geologic Principles (4)
  • MATH 140: Precalculus (4)
  • PHYS 110: Astronomy (4)
  • PHYS 125 & 135: College Physics I w Lab (5)
Social Studies (grades 5-12)
  • POLS 151: American Government (4)
  • Choose two of the following:
    • Anthropology Course (4)
    • Psychology Course (4) (may not use PSYC 101)
    • Sociology Course
  • Choose two of the following:
    • HIST 251: Colonial American History (4)
    • HIST 253: 20th Century U.S. History (4)
    • HIST 460: History of the Western and Northwestern U.S. (4)
  • Choose two of the following:
    • HIST 107: Western Civilizations (4)
    • HIST 108: Western Civilizations (4)
    • HIST 215: Modern World History (4)
    • HIST 252: 19th-Century U.S. History (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • HIST 335: The History of the Caribbean (4)
    • HIST 337: The History of Mexico (4)
    • HIST 338: Modern China (4)
    • HIST 339: Revolutionary China (4)
    • HIST 340: Modern Japan (4)
    • HIST 344: The Andes in Latin American History (4)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics (4)
    • ECON 102: Principles of Macroeconomics (4)
Spanish (grades P-12)
  • HISP 101: Elementary Spanish (4)
  • HISP 102: Elementary Spanish (4)
  • HISP 201: Intermediate Spanish (4)
  • HISP 202: Intermediate Spanish (4)
  • HISP 301: Hispanic Voices for Social Change (4)
  • EDUC 850: Acquisition Language Development (2)
  • EDUC 851: Methods and Leadership: Differentiating Instruction (4)
Special Education (grades P-12)
  • SPED 315: Assessment & Evaluation in Special Education (2)
  • SPED 322: Moderate Disabilities and Transitions (3)
  • SPED 404: Communication and Collaboration (2)
  • SPED 424: Learners with Special Needs in the General Education Classroom (4)
  • SPED 430: Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities (4)
  • SPED 442: Technology in Special Education (2)
  • SPED 450: Early Childhood Special Education (2)
  • SPED 454: Students with Physical Challenges (2)
Theatre Arts
  • COMA 212: Public Speaking (2)
  • DANC 170: Introduction to Dance (4)
  • ENGL 301: Shakespeare (4)
  • THEA 160: Introduction to Theatre (4)
  • THEA 225: Theatre Practicum (1)
  • THEA 250: Acting I - Fundamentals (4)
  • THEA 255: Stage Technology (4)
  • THEA 330: Script Analysis (4)
  • THEA 350: Acting II - Scene Study (4)
  • THEA 360: Theatre History I (4)
  • THEA 365: Theatre History II (4)
  • THEA 425: Theatre Practicum (1)
Visual Arts (grades P-12)
  • ARTD 101: Drawing (4)
  • ARTD 180: History of Western Art I (4)
  • ARTD 181: History of Western Art II (4)
  • ARTD 220: Photography I - BW Photography (4)
  • ARTD 250: Sculpture I (4)
  • ARTD 280: Art Methodology and Theory (4)
  • ARTD 340: Elementary Art Education (2)
  • ARTD 365: Painting I (4)
  • ARTD 440: Secondary Art Education (2)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • ARTD 102: 2D Design/Color Theory (4)
    • ARTD 110: Graphic Design I (4)
    • ARTD 202: 3D Design (4)
    • ARTD 210: Graphic Design 2 (4)
    • ARTD 310: Design Graphics 3 (4)
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
Major in Outreach Education (pending approval by PLU Board of Regents Fall 2013)
55 semester hours

The Outreach Education major is designed to complement the current elementary education major and has the same entrance requirements. This major prepares candidates for non-school type of educative jobs. The course of study includes:

  1. content-related information for specific area of interest;
  2. educational theory and methods classes; and
  3. two new courses specifically designed for students who plan to use their education background for educational work in non-school community institutions, such as: museums, environmental education centers, performing arts organizations, businesses, etc.

This education background along with the student's area of academic emphasis will be taken into consideration for the job-shadow and internship components of this program.

Required Content Area and Minor

Students must complete a minor in the content area most closely related to their area of outreach education interest. For example, if a student is interested in working in a historical museum, the student would do a minor in history; if a student is interested in working in an art museum, the area of the minor would be in art. The area of the minor will be determined in consultation with an advisor.

Education Sequence Classes

In general, students will follow the sequence show earlier in this section for elementary education students with the addition of two courses (EDUC 195, EDUC 360) and different field experiences.

Before Education Sequence
  • EDUC 195: Survey of Education and Community Involvement (4)
First Year: Fall Semester I
  • EDUC 390: Inquiry into Learning I (4)
  • EDUC 392: Inquiry into Learning II (4)
  • EDUC 320: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
  • EDUC 394: Technology and Teaching (2)
  • Practicum: Outreach Education majors will work in schools during this field experience. Experience in the classroom is an important component for understanding education in general, connecting with the schools, developing presentation skills (how to read your audience), and to develop management skills when working with a group of diverse learners and behaviors.
First Year: Spring Semester II
  • EDUC 408: Literacy in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 410: Science and Health in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 424: Inquiry into Teaching I (4)
  • SPED 424: Learners with Special Needs (4)
  • Practicum: This is same practicum taken by all Hub II certification students.
Year Two: Fall Semester III
  • EDUC 360: Tools for Community Involvement (4)
  • EDUC 412: Social Studies in K-8 Education (4)
  • EDUC 425: Inquiry into Teaching II (4)
  • Practicum: Job shadowing experience with a number of different outreach education programs.
Year Two: Spring Semester IV
  • EDUC 495: Internship (placement in an outreach education program) (10 hrs)
  • EDUC 450: Seminar (2)
PREPARATION FOR TEACHING IN PRIVATE AND/OR CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS

Candidates interested in teaching in private or Christian schools will begin their professional preparation by completing all requirements for the Washington State Residency Certificate. In addition, they are required to take the Religion minor (Teacher Education option) noted under the Religion department course offerings, plus add a private school practicum to their program.

EARLY ADVISING

As early as possible during their study at PLU, prospective department majors should meet with the assistant director of admissions and advising to discuss the various options and to determine their program of study.

CERTIFICATION OPTIONS FOR PERSONS WHO HOLD A BACCALAUREATE DEGREE FROM A REGIONALLY-ACCREDITED INSTITUTION

Persons who hold a baccalaureate degree (or higher) from a regionally accredited institution and who wish to pursue a teaching certificate should make an appointment with the assistant director of admissions and advising for a planning session. Options for these individuals include:

ALTERNATIVE ROUTES TO CERTIFICATION PROGRAM
19 semester hours

This 12-month cohort program leads to residency certification and selected endorsements.

PROFESSIONAL/NATIONAL BOARD OF PROFESSIONAL TEACHING STANDARDS CERTIFICATES
www.plu.edu/education/PPD/home.php 
Professional Teaching Certificate

Teachers must earn their Professional Certificate during their first few years of teaching. This Certificate is earned via a passing score on the ProTEACH assessment. Check with OSPI for specific timelines and requirements.  Within a five-year period, after completing the probationary period for teaching in one district, teachers in Washington must earn a Professional Certificate (WAC 18-79A-145), PLU offers a preparation program to assist teachers in preparation and submission of the ProTEACH assessment. More information is available on the School of Education and Kinesiology website.

Qualifications for the Professional Certificate

To qualify for a Professional Certificate, an individual must have completed provisional status as a teacher in a public school pursuant to RCW 28A.405.220 or the equivalent in a state board of education approved private school.

Additional Endorsement Options for Educators
http://www.plu.edu/education/Programs/Add-On-Endorsement.php

To view graduate-level work in the School of Education and Kinesiology, go to the Graduate and Post-Baccalaureate section of this catalog.