Production History

The Theatre program at PLU has a robust production history. Please take some time to browse our past shows. Click on the galleries below to see photos of our theatre program at work.

2013-2014

Mainstage Productions

Kiss Me, Kate

October 11-13 and 18-20

Combine Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew with Porter’s music and lyrics to get Kiss Me, Kate a fun, melodious and sophisticated musical. This play-within-a-play shows each cast member’s on-stage life becoming complicated by events happening offstage. Musical numbers include Why Can’t You Behave, So In Love Am I, Wunderbar, and Brush Up Your Shakespeare. Winner of five Tony Awards for Best Musical, Best Produced Show, Best Script, Best Score and Best Costumes, it was originally produced in 1948 and has long been considered one of Broadway’s treasures.

Night of Musical Theatre

October 25, 26 at 7:30 p.m. and October 27 at 2pm 

This annual musical review features numbers from numerous musical theatre productions. This exclusively student-produced collaboration is sure to have you singing along. BY DONATION.

Inspecting Carol

December 11, 12, 13 and 14 at 7:30 p.m. and December 14 and 15 at 2 p.m.

Lori Lee Wallace, Director

Get your holiday cheer on with this hilarious, madcap comedy! Behind the scenes of a struggling theatre’s annual slapdash production of A Christmas Carol, rehearsals are at a standstill. Tim is no longer Tiny, Scrooge wants to do the play in Spanish (Feliz Navidad), and their funding is on hold pending an inspection. This laugh out loud spoof makes for a night at the theatre that is anything but show business as usual.

In the Garden of Live Flowers

March 7, 8, 14, 15 at 7:30 p.m. and March 16 at 2 p.m.

As author Rachel Carson struggles to complete her book, Silent Spring, she simultaneously fights both her progressing breast cancer and various factions of American enterprise that launch a crusade against her reputation. Carson’s solace is found in Alice in Wonderland, her girlhood literary hero, alter-ego and imaginative guide her subconscious clings to.  Carson’s story converges with a fantastical landscape enlivened by literary, film and cultural references that theatricalize the revolutionary science of Silent Spring.

Macbeth

May 9, 10, 16, 17 at 7:30 p.m. and May 18th at 2 p.m.

Lori Lee Wallace, Director

Considered one of Shakespeare’s darkest and most powerful tragedies. The play dramatizes the corrosive psychological and political effects produced when the Scottish lord Macbeth, chooses evil as the way to power. He commits regicide to become king and furthers his moral descent with a reign of murderous terror. In the end, he loses everything that gives meaning and purpose to his life, before losing his life itself.

Studio Theater

Proof

November 15 and 16 at 7:30 p.m.

Mitchell Helton ‘15, Director

Catherine, the daughter of Robert, a recently deceased mathematical genius and professor at the University of Chicago, struggles with her own mathematical genius and mental illness. The play won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and Tony Award for Best Play. Produced by Vpstart Crow.

The APO One-Acts – “Gone Mad, Will Return”

January 23- 25 at 7:30 p.m.

Completely student produced, this January term festival features three one-act plays that are directed, performed and often written solely by students. Tickets: $5 General Admission, $3 with PLU ID. Tickets available at the door.

  • Naomi in the Living Room by Christopher Durang, directed by Jessi Marlow ’16
  • Hamletmachine by Heiner Müller, directed by Amelia Heath ’15
  • [This Space Intentionally Left Blank] to be written by the cast and crew of [This Space Intentionally Left Blank], directed by David Gordon ’14

Waiting for Godot

April 4 and 5 at 7:30 p.m.

Josh Paramentor ‘15, Director

An absurdist play by Samuel Beckett, in which two characters, Vladimir and Estragon, wait endlessly and in vain for the arrival of someone named Godot. Godot’s absence, as well as numerous other aspects of the play, has led to many different interpretations since the play’s 1953 premiere. It was voted “the most significant English language play of the 20th century.” Produced by Vpstart Crow. May be inappropriate for 12 and under.

2012-2013

Our Town

by Thornton Wilder
Lori Lee Wallace, Director

Oct. 18-20, 26 & 27, 7:30pm and Oct. 28, 2pm

Our Town reveals the ordinary lives of people in the small town of Grover’s Corners, New Hampshire. Defying most conventional theatrical genres, it is neither a comedy nor a tragedy, neither a romance nor a farce. Wilder’s fundamental message in Our Town is that people should appreciate exchanges of everyday life while they live them.

Buried Child

by Sam Shepard
Frank Roberts ’13, Director

December 5-9, 7:30pm

Buried Child, winner of the 1979 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, depicts the fragmentation of the American nuclear family in the context of the 1970s rural economic slowdown, the breakdown of traditional family structures and values, and the disillusionment of the American dream.

How I Learned to Drive

by Paula Vogel
Lori Lee Wallace, Director

March 7,8*,9, 15 & 16, 7:30pm and March 17, 2pm

How I Learned to Drive is a Pulitzer Prize winning drama set in rural Maryland, “before the malls took over.” The play recounts the relationship between a young girl, from a tightly knit lower-middle-class family, and her uncle-by-marriage. It is often described as one of the most disturbing love stories in theatre. Although the play’s subject matter is serious, Vogel includes several comedic devices, which illustrate the basic humanity that binds all of the characters in the play.

Dance 2013

Dance 2013 showcases the versatility and artistry
of student performance and talent in a stunning collection of various dance genres featuring student, guest and faculty compositions

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee

by Rebecca Feldman, William Finn, Rachel Sheinkin and Jay Reiss
Jeff Clapp, Director

May 9-11, 17 & 18, 7:30pm and May 19, 2pm

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee is a hilarious tale of overachievers’ angst, chronicling the experience of six adolescent outsiders vying for the spelling championship of a lifetime. The show’s Tony Award winning creative team has created the unlikeliest of hit musicals about the unlikeliest of heroes: a quirky yet charming cast of outsiders for whom a spelling bee is the one place where they can stand out and fit in at the same time.

Student Series

Night of Musical Theatre

The APO OneActs

Crave

2011-2012

Mainstage Productions

the fantasticks

Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp

October 13, 14, 15, 21, 22 at 7:30pm; October 23 at 2pm
The Studio Theater

The Fantasticks tells the story of a young boy and girl who fall madly in love at the hands of their meddling parents, but soon grow restless and stray from one another. Will their separation provide a deeper appreciation for the love they once shared–or create a permanent gulf between them? The Fantasticks is a quintessential celebration of love in all its gorgeous simplicity and heartbreaking complexities. The show’s original off-Broadway production ran a total of 42 years and 17,162 performances, making it the world’s longest-running musical.

a midsummer night's dream

Directed by Jordan Beck ’12, Theatre B.F.A.

December 7, 8, 9, 10 at 7:30pm; December 11 at 2pm

Eastvold Mainstage Theater

Since its first documented performance in 1605, A Midsummer Night’s Dream has been delighting audiences around the world through film, television, opera, ballet, books and even after all these years – the theatrical stage. It’s a story of four young people who are denied the right to marry the people they love. These lovers wander into the dark, dangerous woods hoping to escape the rules of civilization, but in these woods, outside of the bounds of human law, dangerous and inhuman shadows feud. The fairy King and Queen rage war over the rights to a small child, and this bleeds into the lives of the all the mortals who naively enter their domain- the realm of the moon, of nature, and of dreams. Written by one of the most beloved dramatists of all time, William Shakespeare, this classic comedy explores the dangers and exhilarations of dreams, the power and nature of desire, and “the course of true love,” which “never did run smooth.”

Rabbit Hole

Directed by Professor Brian Desmond

March 8, 9*, 10, 16, 17 at 7:30pm; March 18 at 2pm
The Studio Theater

* Part of the 2011-2012 Focus Series. The Focus Series presents each SOAC discipline dynamically interpreting this year’s common theme of Compassion.

Rabbit Hole, which won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize, is a “transcendent and deeply affecting new play” that “shifts perfectly from hilarity to grief” (Entertainment Weekly). It’s a story of loss, heartbreak, and forgiveness as a family attempts to move on after a life-shattering accident. David Rooney (Variety) writes, “David Lindsay-Abaire has crafted a drama that’s not just a departure but a revelation – an intensely emotional examination of grief, laced with wit, insightfulness, compassion, and searing honesty.”

dance 2012

Directed by Professor Maureen McGill

April 20, 21 at 7:30pm
Eastvold Mainstage Theater

In this highly anticipated annual campus event, the PLU Dance Ensemble presents an invigorating and arresting series of dance numbers sure to delight all.

almost, Maine

Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp

May 10, 11, 12, 18, 19 at 7:30pm
May 20 at 2pm
Eastvold Mainstage Theater

On a cold, clear, moonless night in the middle of winter, all is not quite what it seems in the remote, mythical town of Almost,Maine. As the northern lights hover in the star-filled sky above, Almost’s residents find themselves falling in and out of love in unexpected and often hilarious ways. Knees are bruised. Hearts are broken. But the bruises heal, and the hearts mend–almost – in this delightful midwinter night’s dream.

Other Productions

Dinner with Friends by Donald Margulies, Directed by Kate Howland ’12

NOMT 2011- Elaborate Lives; A Musical Review Directed by Jack Sorensen ’13

2011-12 APO One-Act Festival: Recklessness By Eugene O’ Neil, Directed by Frank Roberts ’13

Otter Pops by Alex Eddy, Directed by Cori DeVerse ’13

Poor Little Doggy by Myia Johnson ’13, Directed by T.R. Robinson ’13

The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Abridged) by Adam Long, Daniel Singer, and Jess Winfield, Directed by Abigail Pishaw ’12

2010-2011

Mainstage Productions

The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940, by John Bishop. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp.

The Seagull, by Anton Chekhov. Directed by Noam Blanks ’11.

The Floating World, by Paula Vogel & Thornton Wilder.

Adapted and Directed by Professor Brian Desmond.

Dance 2011, Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.

The Full Monty, by David Yazbek and Terrence McNally. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp.

Other Productions

NOMT 2010- Louder than Words, Directed by Julia Stockton ’12.

2011 APO One-Act Festival Killing Time:

Waiting by Ethan Cohen, dir. Mark Adam Rud ’12.

Suzy Lee’s Egg Errand, by T.R. Robinson ’13, Directed by Jordan Fermstad ’11.

The man with the flower in his mouth, by Luigi Pirandello. Directed by Lars Foster Jorgensen ’11.


The Unexpected Man, by Yasmina Reza. Directed by Angie Tennant ’12.

2009-2010

Mainstage Productions

Wintertime, by Charles Mee. Directed by Professor Brian Desmond.

The Last Days of Judas Iscariot, by Stephen Adly Guirgis. Directed by Travis Clark Morris ‘10.

The Cripple of Inishmaan, by Martin McDonagh. Directed by Professor Brian Desmond.

Dance 2010. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.

A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp.

Other Productions

Lullaby of Broadway: A Night of Musical Theatre. Directed by Clare Marie Edgerton ‘10.

The APO One-Act Play Festival: World Premieres.
Rocko’s Post-Modern Life, by Paul Elvis Richter ‘10. Directed by Rose Gonzales ‘10.

Robbing Midnight, by Angie Tennant ‘12. Directed by Abigail Pishaw ‘12.

Straight Date, by Justin Huertas ’09. Directed by David Alan Ellis ‘11.

Vpstart Crow Presents: bash: latterday plays, by Neil Labute. Directed by Travis Clark Morris ‘10.

One Song at a Time: A Benefit Concert for Haiti and Chile. Directed by Erin Dorn ‘10.

Man to Man, by Manfred Karge. Directed by Bristol Whalen ‘10.

Numerous Clay Crows Improvisation Events.

2008-2009

Mainstage Productions

The Miser, by Molière. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp.

The Skin of our Teeth, by Thornton Wilder. Directed by Kristina Corbitt ‘10.

A Dream Play, by August Strindberg. Adapted and Directed by Professor Brian Desmond.

Dance 2009, Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.

Company, by Stephen Sondheim and George Furth. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp.

Music Direction by Justin Huertas ‘09.

Other Productions

Vpstart Crow Presents: Actor!, by Frederick Stroppel. Directed by Steven Davis ‘08.

Not Your Grandma’s Showtunes 3: A Musical Theatre Cabaret Showcase.

Heart & Music: A Night of Musical Theatre. Directed by Lauren Nance ‘09.

Vpstart Crow Presents: Oleanna, by David Mamet. Directed by Niclas R. Olson ‘09.

The APO One-Act Play Festival: 
Does It Make a Sound?


Act Without Words I, by Samuel Beckett. Directed by Jonathan Lee ‘09.

Breakthrough: A Musical Revue. Directed by Erin K. Dorn ‘10.

Heliocentric, by Dylan Twiner ‘10. Directed by Kirsten Helland ‘10.

Vpstart Crow Presents: No Exit, by Jean-Paul Sartre. Directed by Bradley Stieger ‘09.

 
The First Warning, by August Strindberg. Directed by Laura Barnes ‘09.

Last Waltz on a Midnight Violin. Written and Directed by Niclas R. Olson ‘09.

Not Your Grandma’s Showtunes 4: A Musical Theatre Cabaret Showcase.



Numerous Clay Crows Improvisation Events.

2007-2008

Mainstage Productions


Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, by Tom Stoppard. Directed by Tristan Morris ‘08.

The Illusion, by Pierre Corneille, Freely Adapted by Tony Kushner. Directed by Professor Brian Desmond.

Dance 2008. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.

Noises Off, by Michael Frayn. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp.

Other Productions

Vpstart Crow Presents: The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe, by Jane Wagner.
Directed by Tristan Morris ‘08.

Not Your Grandma’s Showtunes: A Musical Theatre Cabaret Showcase.

Life Force: A Night of Musical Theatre. Directed by Natalie Heikkinen ‘08.

The APO One-Act Play Festival:

Trapped. 
Snowed In, by Kristina Saldaña. Directed by Sara Hoagland ‘08.

Trifles, by Susan Glaspell. Directed by Steven Davis ‘08.

The Zoo Story, by Edward Albee. Directed by Travis Tingvall ‘10.

Vpstart Crow Presents: Three Plays by Will Eno. Directed by Julie Wolfson ‘08.

Thom Pain (based on nothing).

Lady Grey (in ever-lowering light).

Mr. Theatre Comes Home Different.

Vpstart Crow Presents: Love Letters, by A. R. Gurney. Directed by Julie Wolfson ‘08.

Fire, Desire, Passion & Sin. Written and Performed by Christopher Staudinger ‘08.

Not Your Grandma’s Showtunes 2: A Musical Theatre Cabaret Showcase.

Red Noise, A Radio Play by Max Falkenberg. Directed by Brie Yost ‘08.

New Works: Staged Readings of One-Act Plays Written by Students in Theatre 345: Playwriting.

Heart Failure, by Kimberly Henry ‘08.


A Tree Falling in the Woods, by Dylan Twiner ‘10.

Red Line Express from Abaddon, by Joseph Fries ‘08.

Rocko’s Post-Modern Life, by Paul Elvis Richter ‘10.

Numerous Clay Crows Improvisation Events.

2006-2007

Mainstage Productions

Laughter on the 23rd Floor, by Neil Simon. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp.



Eclipsed, by Patricia Burke Brogan. Directed by Julianna Brei-Crawley ‘07.

The Glass Menagerie, by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Professor Brian Desmond.

Dance 2007. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.

Cabaret, by John Kander and Fred Ebb. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp. 
Music Direction by Christopher Tavern.

Other Productions

What I Did for Love: A Night of Musical Theatre. Directed by Kristin Burch ‘07.

The APO One-Act Play Festival:

For Whom the Southern Belle Tolls, by Christopher Durang. 
Directed by Natalie Heikkinen ‘08.

Heartbeats, by Max August Falkenberg. Directed by Ingrid Running ‘07.

Another Hundred People: A Musical Revue. Directed by Justin Huertas ‘09.

Proof, by David Auburn. Directed by C. J. Butenschoen ‘07.

2000-2006

2005-2006

Mainstage Productions:

The Laramie Project, by Moisés Kaufman and the Members of Tectonic Theatre Project. 
Directed by Professor Brian Desmond.
 The Birthday Party, by Harold Pinter. Directed by Sean William Harburg ‘06.
 Twelfth Night, by William Shakespeare. Adapted and Directed by Professor Brian Desmond.
 Dance 2006. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
 The Spitfire Grill, by James Valcq and Fred Alley. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp.

Other Productions:


Louder Than Words: A Night of Musical Theatre. Directed by Jill Anderson ‘06. 
The APO One-Act Play Festival:
Boise, Idaho, by Sean Michael Welch. Directed by Brie Yost ‘08. 
Reverse Transcription, by Tony Kushner. Directed by Ali Criss ‘07 and Cameron Pahl. 
‘Identity Crisis, by Christopher Durang. Directed by Max August Falkenberg.
 New Works: Staged Readings of One-Act Plays Written by Students in Theatre 345: Playwriting.
 One-Act Plays by Max August Falkenberg, Natalie Heikkinen ‘08, Tyler Pederson ‘07, and Julie Wolfson ‘08.

2004-2005

The Constant Wife, by W. Somerset Maugham. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp. 
A Handful of Rainbows, by Jonathan Troy. Directed by Elizabeth K. Widmer ‘05.
 Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck. Directed by Visiting Professor Carl Anderson. 
Dance 2005. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
 Brigadoon, by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp. 
Musical Direction by Professor Jeffrey Bell-Hanson.

2003-2004

The Boys Next Door, by Tom Griffin. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp.
 Talking With…, by Jane Martin. Directed by Meredith Heller ‘04.
 Book of Days, by Lanford Wilson. Directed by Visiting Professor Carl Anderson.
 Dance 2004. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
 Picasso at the Lapin Agile, by Steve Martin. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp.

2002-2003

Pippin, by Stephen Schwartz. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp.
 APO Presents Two One-Act Plays:
Top Girls, by Caryl Churchill.
 Art, by Yasmina Reza, Translated by Christopher Hampton. 
The Miss Firecracker Contest, by Beth Henley. Directed by Dan Gomez ‘03.
 The Mousetrap, by Agatha Christie. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp. 
Dance 2003. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
 Hamlet, by William Shakespeare. Directed by Professor William Becvar and Matt Orme.

2001-2002

Angels in America: Millenium Approaches, by Tony Kushner. 
Directed by Visiting Professor Danforth Comins.
 Biloxi Blues, by Neil Simon. Directed by Scott Stangland ‘02.
 The Last Night of Ballyhoo, by Alfred Uhry. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
 Dance 2002: Dance World. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
Spinning into Butter, by Rebecca Gilman. Directed by Visiting Professor Cynthia White.

2000-2001

Lend Me a Tenor, by Ken Ludwig. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
 APO Presents: A Night of Absurdity:
The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged), by The Reduced Shakespeare Company. Directed by Rachel Morton.
 Titanic, by Christopher Durang. Directed by Nathan Rice. 
Uncommon Women and Others, by Wendy Wasserstein. Directed by Dahli Langer ‘01.
 Angry Housewives, by A. M. Collins and Chad Henry. Directed by Professor Jeff A. Clapp.
 Dance 2001. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
 The Merchant of Venice, by William Shakespeare. 
Directed by Professor William Becvar and Visiting Professor Danforth Comins.

1990-2000

1999-2000

Ah, Wilderness!, by Eugene O’Neill. Directed by Professor William Parker.
The Ride Down Mt. Morgan, by Arthur Miller. Directed by Louis Hobson ‘00.
Inspecting Carol, by Daniel Sullivan and the Seattle Rep. Co. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Dance 2000. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
The Shadow Box, by Michael Cristofer. Directed by Scott Green.

1998-1999

Rumors, by Neil Simon. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Shadowlands, by William Nicholson. Directed by Rona Pryor ‘99.
A Man for All Seasons, by Robert Bolt. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Dance 1999: Dance Power. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
The Threepenny Opera, by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill. Directed by Professor William Parker.

1997-1998

Light Up the Sky, by Moss Hart. Directed by Professor William Parker.
The Trip to Bountiful, by Horton Foote. Directed by Kevin B. Lee ‘98.
Night Watch, by Lucille Fletcher. Directed by Professor William Parker.
Dance 1998. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
Elegies for Angels, Punks and Raging Queens, by Bill Russell. Directed by Professor William Becvar.

1996-1997

The Foreigner, by Larry Shue. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Crimes of the Heart, by Beth Henley. Directed by Danforth Comins ‘97.
A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Professor William Parker.
Dance 1997: Dance Land. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
Amadeus, by Peter Shaffer. Directed by Professor William Becvar.

1995-1996

The Time of Your Life, by William Saroyan. Directed by Professor William Parker.
Lips Together, Teeth Apart, by Terrence McNally. Directed by Peter Boyd Wilburn ‘96.
Cyrano de Bergerac, by Edmond Rostand. Directed by Visiting Professor Michael Robinson.
Dance 1996. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
Candida, by George Bernard Shaw. Directed by Professor William Parker.

1994-1995

Bus Stop, by William Inge. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Equus, by Peter Shaffer. Directed by Marc Ostlie-Olson ‘95.
The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940, by John Bishop. Directed by Professor William Parker.
Dance 1995. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
The Grapes of Wrath, adapted by Frank Galati. Directed by Professor William Becvar.

1993-1994

A View from the Bridge, by Arthur Miller. Directed by Professor William Parker.
APO Presents: An Evening of Four One-Acts:
Loyalties, by Murphy Guyer. Directed by Jennifer Berk.
Visiting Dad, by Judith Fein. Directed by Virginia Weisweaver.
Night, by Harold Pinter. Directed by T. J. Keiter.
You Can’t Trust the Male, by Randy Noojin. Directed by Douglas Steves ‘94.
Macbeth, by William Shakespeare. Directed by Professor William Becvar and Michael Robinson.
Dance 1994. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
Brighton Beach Memoirs, by Neil Simon. Directed by Professor William Parker.

1992-1993

Mother Courage and Her Children, by Bertolt Brecht. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Spoon River Anthology, by Edgar Lee Masters. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Dance 1993. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
Vital Signs, by Jane Martin. Directed by Visiting Professor J. Robert Wills.

1991-1992

The Big Knife, by Clifford Odets. Directed by Professor William Parker.
APO Presents: An Evening of Three One-Acts:
Birdbath, by Leonard Melfi. Directed by Shelley Towne.
Jersey Girls, by John Ford Noonan. Directed by Stacy Senf.
Next, by Terrence McNally. Directed by Kristin Sweet.
Much Ado About Nothing, by William Shakespeare. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Dance 1992. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill Seal.
The Heiress, by Ruth and Augustus Goetz. Directed by Professor William Parker.

1990-1991

Moments: A Revue of Theatre and Song Commemorating 100 Years of Theatre at PLU.
Co-Directed by Professor William Parker and Professor William Becvar.
Angel Street (Gaslight), by Patrick Hamilton. Directed by Patrick T. Foran ‘91.
The Apprentice. Written and Directed by Professor William Parker.
Dance 1991. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill Seal.
A Dream Play, by August Strindberg.  Directed by Professor William Becvar.

1980-1990

1989-1990

Death of a Salesman, by Arthur Miller. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Just As We Are. Written and Directed by Professor William Parker.
The Man Who Came to Dinner, by Kaufman and Hart. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
APO Presents: Two One-Act Plays:
Jesse, by John Remington. Directed by Jeff A. Clapp ‘90.
Black Comedy, by Peter Shaffer. Directed by Nanna Bjone ‘90.
Dance 1990. Directed by Maureen McGill Seal.
The Glass Menagerie, by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Professor William Parker.

1988-1989

From These Sterile Hills. Written and Directed by Professor William Parker.
Agnes of God, by John Pielmeier. Directed by Visiting Professor Rebecca Adams.
APO Moonlight Theatre Presents: Laundry and Bourbon and Lone Star, by James McClure.
A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen. Directed by Visiting Professor Rebecca Adams.
Dance 1989. Directed by Maureen McGill Seal.
The Actor’s Nightmare and Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You, by Christopher Durang.
Directed by B. J. Douglas.

1987-1988

The Fantasticks, by Tom Jones and Harvey Schmidt. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Choreography by Professor Maureen McGill Seal.
The Dining Room, by A. R. Gurney. Directed by Professor William Parker.
The Miser, by Molière. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Dance 1988: Dance Quake. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill Seal.
The Lark, by Jean Anouilh, adapted by Lillian Hellman. Directed by Professor William Parker.

1986-1987

The Andersonville Trial, by Saul Levitt. Directed by Professor William Parker.
Royal Gambit, by Hermann Gressieker. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
All My Sons, by Arthur Miller. Directed by Professor William Parker.
Dance 1987. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill Seal.

1985-1986

Arms and the Man, by George Bernard Shaw. Directed by Visiting Professor Richard Edwards.
Waiting for Godot, by Samuel Beckett. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
You Know I Can’t Hear You When the Water’s Running, by Robert Anderson. 
Directed by Robin Dollarhide ‘86.
Romeo and Juliet, by William Shakespeare. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Dance 1986. Directed by Maureen McGill.
Crimes of the Heart, by Beth Henley. Directed by Visiting Professor Bruce Siddons.

1984-1985

Kiss Me, Kate, by Cole Porter & Sam and Bella Spewack.
The Cherry Orchard, by Anton Chekhov. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Mary, Mary, by Jean Kerr. Directed by Sandra Doyle ‘85.
The Shadow Box, by Michael Cristofer. Directed by Professor William Parker.
California Suite, by Neil Simon. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Dance 1985. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
Six Characters in Search of an Author, by Luigi Pirandello. Directed by Professor William Parker.

1983-1984

J. B., by Archibald MacLeish. Directed by Professor William Parker.
I Remember Mama, by John Van Druten. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Candide, by Leonard Bernstein.
Oh, Dad, Poor Dad…, by Arthur L. Kopit. Directed by Professor William Parker.
Dance 1984. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
Child’s Play, by Robert Marasco. Directed by Professor William Becvar.

1982-1983

The Scarecrow, by Percy MacKaye. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Suddenly Last Summer, by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Professor William Parker.
Picnic, by William Inge. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
The Strolling Players, by Christian Moe and Darwin Payne. Directed by Professor William Parker.
Dance 1983: Sundance. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
The American Clock, by Arthur Miller. Directed by Rod Pilloud.

1981-1982

A Flea in Her Ear, by Georges Feydeau. Directed by Michael J. Arndt.
Dance 1982: Dance Planet. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.

1980-1981

Dark of the Moon, by Howard Richardson and William Berney. 
Directed by Professor William Parker. Musical Direction by Professor David Robbins.
Choreography by Professor Maureen McGill.
Harvey, by Mary Chase. Directed by Visiting Professor Lise Olson.
PLU Children’s Theatre Presents: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, by C. S. Lewis.
A Thurber Carnival, by James Thurber. Directed by Deborah DeGrosse ‘81.
Dance 1981: Dancescape. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
A Delicate Balance, by Edward Albee. Directed by Visiting Professor Lise Olson.

1970-1980

1979-1980

The House of Blue Leaves, by John Guare. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Hold Me!, by Jules Feiffer. Directed by Lisa A. Johnson ‘80.
Ghosts, by Henrik Ibsen. Directed by Professor William Parker.
Dance 1980: Dance Kinetics. Directed by Professor Maureen McGill.
PLU Children’s Theatre Presents: The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien. Directed by Phil Holte.
Absurd Person Singular, by Alan Ayckbourn. Directed by Professor William Becvar.

1978-1979

The Pajama Game, by George Abbott and Richard Bissell.
Directed by Professor William Becvar. Musical Supervision by Professor David Robbins. 
Choreography by Professor Maureen McGill.
The Gingerbread Lady, by Neil Simon. Directed by Visiting Professor Barbara A. MacDonald.
Blood Wedding, by Federico Garcia Lorca. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Under Milk Wood, by Dylan Thomas. Directed by Visiting Professor Barbara MacDonald-Hemdan.

1977-1978

The Canterbury Tales, from the tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. Directed by Professor William Parker.
The Miracle Worker, by William Gibson. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
Summer and Smoke, by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Professor William Parker.
The Beaux Stratagem, by George Farquhar. Directed by Professor William Becvar.

1976-1977

The Music Man, by Meredith Wilson. Directed by Professor William Becvar. 
Music Direction by Professor David Robbins. Choreography by Katherine Beckman.
PLU Children’s Theatre Presents: Holidays.
Little Murders, by Jules Feiffer. Directed by Kevin McKeon ‘77.
Luther, by John Osborne. Directed by Professor William Becvar.

1975-1976

1776, by Sherman Edwards and Peter Stone. Directed by Professor William Parker. 
Music Direction by Scot Cinnamon. Choreography by Katherine Beckman.
Hedda Gabler, by Henrik Ibsen. Directed by Professor William Parker.
PLU Children’s Theatre Presents: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, by Washington Irving.
Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare. Directed by Professor William Becvar.

1974-1975

The Fan, by Carlo Goldoni. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, by Jay Presson Allen. Directed by Jim Degan ‘75.
Agamemnon, by Aeschylus. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
I Never Sang for My Father, by Robert Anderson. Directed by Professor William Parker.

1973-1974

The Skin of Our Teeth, by Thornton Wilder. Directed by Professor William Becvar.
PLU Children’s Theatre Presents: Rumpelstiltskin, by Charlotte B. Chorpenning. 
Directed by Professor Eric Nordholm.
I Am a Camera, by John Van Druten. Directed by Carol Brandt ’74.
The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde. Directed by Karen E. Anderson ’74.
Oklahoma, by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein. Directed by Professor Eric Nordholm.
Music Direction by Maurice H. Skones.
PLU Children’s Theatre Presents: Punch & Judy, by Aurand Harris.
Directed by Professor Eric Nordholm.
The Crucible, by Arthur Miller. Directed by Professor William Becvar.

1972-1973

The Taming of the Shrew, by William Shakespeare.
PLU Children’s Theatre Presents: The Brave Little Tailor, by The Brothers Grimm.
Hadrian VII, by Peter Luke.
The King and I, by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein.
A Company of Wayward Saints, by George Herman.

1971-1972

The Visit, by Friedrich Dürrenmatt.
You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown, by Clark Gesner.
Bus Stop, by William Inge.