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Department of English

Adela Ramos

Assistant Professor of English

Adela Ramos
Phone:
Office:
Hauge Administration Building - Room 201-A
Tu & Th:
3:45 pm - 5:30 pm
  • Professional
  • Personal

Education

  • Ph.D., English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University, 2010
  • M.A., English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University, 2004
  • B.A., English Language and Literature, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), 2001
  • Diploma, Translation Studies, El Colegio de México, Mexico City, 1998-2000

Areas of Emphasis or Expertise

  • Eighteenth-Century British Literature
  • Critical Animal Studies
  • Ecocriticism
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Genre and The History of the Novel
  • Border Literature

Selected Presentations

  • Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences, Reading and Writing Animals: Care and Critical Inquiry in the Liberal Arts College Classroom, San Diego, CA (June 2015)
  • American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, “Like Rational Creatures”: Animal Rights and Women’s Rights in Mary Wollstonecraft’s Original Stories and A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Los Angeles, CA (March 2015)
  • Reading Animals, University of Sheffield, “An Animal of a Different Species: Hares, Women, and Anthropomorphism in Henry Fielding’s Joseph Andrews and Tom Jones.”, Sheffield, UK (July 2014)
  • Center for Eighteenth-Century Studies, University of Indiana, “‘His Dignity as an Ambassador’: Exotic Pets and Reciprocity in Maria Edgeworth’s Belinda.”, Bloomington, IN (May 2014)
  • Pride and Prejudices, “Species Thinking: Animals, Women, and Literary Form in Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman.”, Chawton House, Alton, UK (July 2013)
  • American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, “Africans, Women, Aloe, and Macaws: Species Diversity and Social Hierarchy in Maria Edgeworth’s Belinda.”, Albuquerque, NM (March 2010)

Accolades

  • Kelmer-Roe Student-Faculty Research Award Recipient, AY 2015-2016 with Clay Snell
  • Fellow at University of Victory Digital Humanities Summer Institute, 2015
  • Karen Hille Phillips Regency Advancement Award, 2013
  • Whiting Foundation Dissertation Completion Fellowship, 2009

Biography

Adela Ramos was born in Mexico City, where she received her B.A. with honors in Modern Languages and Literatures from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) and a Diplome in Translation Studies from El Colegio de México. She completed her PhD in English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University (New York) with an emphasis on eighteenth-century British Literature and was a Whiting Foundation Fellow (2009 – 2010).

Her teaching emphases include eighteenth-century British literature, critical animal studies, ecocriticism, gender and race, history of the novel, and literature and immigration. She teaches for the First-Year Experience Program, the Environmental Studies Program, and as of Spring ’17, for the Women and Gender Studies Program. As an affiliate faculty member of the Environmental Studies program, she participates in ENVT 350 and ENVT 498.

Her book project, Species of Writing: Animals, Humans, and Literary Form in Eighteenth-Century Britain, traces how eighteenth-century British writers engaged the species concept and anthropomorphism to re-order relations among humans and animals, men and women, and racial others.

Her translation of Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s ‘To a Young Ass’ was published in Escarcha a medianoche (Arsenal). Her scholarly publications include “Species Thinking: Animals, Women, and Literary Form in Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman” (Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, forthcoming) and “The Goddess Coatlicue: Femicide and Environmental Renewal in Homero Aridjis’ La leyenda de los soles (The Battersew Review, forthcoming). Her work on hare hunting in Henry Fielding’s Joseph Andrews and Tom Jones is forthcoming in an edited volume titled, A History of Literary Animals, co-edited by Karen Edwards, Derek Ryan, and Jane Spencer (2018). In addition, she is currently completing work on an article that explores the relationship between self-stranger and interspecies relationships in Maria Edgeworth’s novel, Belinda.

She is a member of the Environmental Studies Program Committee and co-editor of the Division of the Humanities translation journal, Shadows and Echoes.