Department ofHistory

History 301must be completed with a C- grade or better before student can take HIST 494, 496, or 497 (capstone courses).  Each objective in HIST 301 is listed below.  Many of these objectives insure that students who pass HIST 301 will be able successfully to complete a History capstone and achieve the objectives of the History major.   The designations in parentheses at the beginning of each objective refer to the History Learning Objectives/Major list.

(1a/1b) Students complete exercises on reading and writing history using selected texts

(1c) Students must develop a topic to support a substantial research paper based on primary sources, written in clear prose and with a thesis, and documented with the citation system and bibliography format (notes-bibliography style) found in the Chicago Manual of Style

(1 a, b, c, d, e) Students must write a substantial research paper based on primary sources, written in clear prose and with a thesis, and documented with citation system and bibliographic format (notes-bibliography style) found in the Chicago Manual of Style.

(3 a, b and 4 a, b, c, d) Students must develop oral presentations of their research and provide critiques of selected examples of student work

A History Capstone (choose HIST 494 or 496 or 497, all of which are offered each spring semester)  must be completed with a C- grade or better.  The designations in parentheses at the beginning of each objective refer to the History Learning Objectives/Major.

(1a / 1b) Students read works on historiography

(1a) Students must integrate historiography into their seminar research paper

(3 a, b) Students will offer formal presentations related to issues of periodization, historiography, and/or philosophies of history, etc.

(1 c, e, f) Students will formulate a topic for a seminar paper of at least 25 pages in length, using appropriate collection and analysis of primary source materials or extensive use of secondary sources and engagement of issues in a strongly historiographical manner

(1 d, g) Students must write a seminar paper of at least 25 pages in length using appropriate collection and analysis of primary source materials or extensive use of secondary sources and engagement of issues in a strongly historiographical manner

(3 a, b and 4 a, b, c, d) Students must develop oral presentations of their seminar project research and provide critiques of selected examples of other students’ research