Classics Courses

Classical Languages: Greek and Latin

GREK 111-112: Intensive Elementary Greek

GREK 111-112 is an 8-credit intensive course graded A/P/F and offered every Fall semester.

As an 8-credit course, GREK 111-112 takes up two course slots, but you can complete Option 2 of the language requirement in one semester (great for Religion majors!) or get a real jump on Option 1.  Since it is graded A/P/F, you can be sure that exemplary performance will be rewarded (A) but you don’t need to worry about the course negatively affecting your GPA (great for Pre-Med!).

The way the 8 credits work, we meet during regular course hours, but we meet five days a week.  The work can be intense, but it is also intensely rewarding.  The daily meetings ensure that you will build a strong camaraderie with your classmates and you will not fall behind on coursework.

Try it out this Fall!

GREK 211/311: Greek Prose (C)

GREK 211 and GREK 212 are non-sequential courses that follow GREK 111-112.  That means you can take either course in either order, and they can be repeated for credit as GREK 311 and 312.

GREK 211/311 is an introduction to Greek prose.  The class will read one or more prose authors, discuss their historical contexts, learn about Greek genres, and study approaches to interpretation (including literary theory).  At the 300 level, students will focus more intently on analysis and interpretation of Classical texts in their ancient context.

The authors and time periods studied in GREK 211/311 change from year to year, so ask your professors whom the class will read next, and let them know if you have any requests!

GREK 212/312: Greek Poetry (C)

GREK 211 and GREK 212 are non-sequential courses that follow GREK 111-112.  That means you can take either course in either order, and they can be repeated for credit as GREK 311 and 312.

GREK 212/312 is an introduction to Greek poetry.  The class will read one or more Greek poets, discuss their historical contexts, learn about Greek genres, poetic structures (including meter), and study approaches to interpretation (including literary theory).  At the 300 level, students will focus more intently on analysis and interpretation of Classical texts in their ancient context.

The authors and time periods studied in GREK 212/312 change from year to year, so ask your professors whom the class will read next, and let them know if you have any requests!

LATIN 111-112: Intensive Elementary Latin

GREK 111-112 is an 8-credit intensive course graded A/P/F and offered every Fall semester.

As an 8-credit course, LATN 111-112 takes up two course slots, but you can complete Option 2 of the language requirement in one semester (great for Religion majors!) or get a real jump on Option 1.  Since it is graded A/P/F, you can be sure that exemplary performance will be rewarded (A) but you don’t need to worry about the course negatively affecting your GPA (great for Pre-Med!).

The way the 8 credits work, we meet during regular course hours, but we meet five days a week.  The work can be intense, but it is also intensely rewarding.  The daily meetings ensure that you will build a strong camaraderie with your classmates and you will not fall behind on coursework.

Try it out this Fall!

LATN 211/311: Latin Prose (C)

LATN 211 and LATN 212 are non-sequential courses that follow LATN 111-112.  That means you can take either course in either order, and they can be repeated for credit as LATN 311 and 312.

LATN 211/311 is an introduction to Latin prose.  The class will read one or more prose authors, discuss their historical contexts, learn about Latin genres, and study approaches to interpretation (including literary theory).  At the 300 level, students will focus more intently on analysis and interpretation of Classical texts in their ancient context.

The authors and time periods studied in LATN 211/311 change from year to year, so ask your professors whom the class will read next, and let them know if you have any requests!

LATN 212/312: Latin Poetry (C)

LATN 211 and LATN 212 are non-sequential courses that follow LATN 111-112.  That means you can take either course in either order, and they can be repeated for credit as LATN 311 and 312.

LATN 212/312 is an introduction to Latin poetry.  The class will read one or more Latin poets, discuss their historical contexts, learn about Latin genres, poetic structures (including meter), and study approaches to interpretation (including literary theory).  At the 300 level, students will focus more intently on analysis and interpretation of Classical texts in their ancient context.

The authors and time periods studied in LATN 212/312 change from year to year, so ask your professors whom the class will read next, and let them know if you have any requests!

GREK/LATN 491: Independent Study

Independent studies allow individualized instruction on a wide variety of topics.  Speak with your Classics professors about topics that interest you and whether an independent study might be the route to go. (1-4)

Recent Independent Studies have included:

  • Gender and Sexuality in Ovid’s Metamorphoses
  • The Poems of Catullus
  • Warfare in Antiquity

Classical Studies Courses: History, Literature, Mythology, and more

CLAS/ENGL 231: Masterpieces of European Literature (LT)

Representative works of classical, medieval, and early Renaissance literature. Cross-listed with ENGL 231. (4)

CLAS 241/341: J-Term in Greece or Italy (LT)

Our J-Term courses alternate years between Greece and Italy.  CLAS 241 focuses on the culture and civilization of Greece or Italy on site, while CLAS 341 (offered at the same time and place) includes a language component for students wishing to continue their studies of Latin or  Greek while visiting the ancient sites.  For more details, visit the Classics Resources page under “Study Away” and “Wang Center”.


 

J-Term in Greece:

CLAS 241/341 explores ancient Greek life and culture as it is preserved in modern Greece—both in ruins and in the contemporary experience.  We investigate how the Greeks came to prominence in the Mediterranean, the effects they had on each other and on neighboring civilizations, and their legacy as it lives on today.


J-Term in Italy:

The course provides an overview of ancient Roman life and culture as it is preserved in Italy—both in ruins and in the contemporary experience. We will investigate how Rome exploited urban and rural environments as well as the pre-Roman and neighboring Italic peoples, to what extent Roman practices were sustainable and how they compare with contemporary movements

CLAS/HIST 326: A History of Medicine

An investigation of medical history from antiquity to the European Renaissance (c. 1660) through an examination of Greco-Roman, Islamic, Byzantine, and European traditions and their attendant concepts of health, healing, and disease. Cross-listed with HIST 326. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or instructor permission. (4)

CLAS/HIST 321: Greek Civilization

The political, social, and cultural history of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. Special attention to the literature, art, and intellectual history of the Greeks. Cross-listed with HIST 321. (4)

CLAS/HIST 322: Roman Civilization

The history of Rome from the foundation of the city to CE 395, the death of Theodosius the Great. Emphasis on Rome’s expansion over the Mediterranean and on its constitutional history. Attention to the rise of Christianity within a Greco-Roman context. Cross-listed with HIST 322. (4)

CLAS 350: Classical and Comparative Mythology (LT)

A literary study of myths and of the methodologies used to interpret their origin, function, and meaning. This study originates in the texts of Greco-Roman authors and includes comparisons with other world myths. All readings are in English, but students with other language abilities are encouraged to use them. (4)

CLAS 491: Independent Study

Independent studies allow individualized instruction on a wide variety of topics.  Speak with your Classics professors about topics that interest you and whether an independent study might be the route to go. (1-4)

Recent Independent Studies have included:

  • Gender and Sexuality in Ovid’s Metamorphoses
  • The Poems of Catullus
  • Warfare in Antiquity

Classics in Other Disciplines: Art, IHON, Philosophy, and Religion

ART 180: History of Western Art I (AR)

A survey tracing the development of Western art and architecture from prehistory to the end of the Middle Ages. (4)

Visit the Art & Design Department‘s website and see their courses in the Course Catalogue.

IHON 111: Authority and Discovery

Examines innovative ideas and institutions from ancient, medieval, and early modern societies that have shaped the contemporary world. Themes include the rise of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; influential models of authority and government; alternative models of coherence and diversity; religious reformations and utopian movements; technical innovation; and interpreting nature. (4)

Visit the IHON website and see their courses in the Course Catalogue.

PHIL 331: Ancient Philosophy (PH)

The development of philosophical thought and methods from the Pre-Socratic period to the end of the fourth century CE. Emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. (4)

Visit the Philosophy Department‘s website and see their courses in the Course Catalogue.

RELI 211: Religion and Literature of the Hebrew Bible (RG)

The literary, historical, and theological dimensions of the Hebrew Bible, including perspectives on contemporary issues. These writings later formed the Jewish Scriptures and the Christian Old Testament. (4)

Visit the Religion Department‘s website and see their courses in the Course Catalogue.

RELI 212: Religion and Literature of the New Testament (RC)

The literary, historical, and theological dimensions of the New Testament, including perspectives on contemporary issues. (4)

Visit the Religion Department‘s website and see their courses in the Course Catalogue.

RELI 220: Early Christianity (RC)

The origins, thought and expansion of the Christian Church; the growth of Christian involvement in culture to the end of the papacy of Gregory I (604 CE). (4)

Visit the Religion Department‘s website and see their courses in the Course Catalogue.

RELI 330: Hebrew Bible Studies (RG)

Major areas of inquiry: the prophets, psalms, wisdom literature, mythology, theology, or biblical archeology. (4)

Visit the Religion Department‘s website and see their courses in the Course Catalogue.

RELI 331: New Testament Studies (RC)

Major areas of inquiry: intertestamental, synoptic, Johannine, or Pauline literature, or New Testament theology. (4)

Visit the Religion Department‘s website and see their courses in the Course Catalogue.

Independent Study

Approved independent studies in other disciplines may count towards the Classics Major or Minor.  See the Classics Program Director or the Chair of Languages and Literatures for more information.

Study Away

See the Study Away FAQ in our Classics Resources page!

Archaeology and Digs

What is Classical Archaeology?

Simply put, Classical Archaeology is the archaeology of the ancient civilizations around the Mediterranean, especially Greece and Rome.

Classical Archaeology takes its cue from Classical Philology (the study of ancient texts and their cultures) and from Anthropology (a more recent discipline of studying human cultures generally).  The Classical Archaeologist combines the two to dig up and preserve ancient sites, study their peoples, and compare what we learn with what those people said about themselves.

A Classical Archaeologist can:

  • investigate and excavate ancient settlements
  • use a variety of modern scientific tools to collect and analyze data about the past, including
    • Satellites
    • LIDAR
    • Laser Altimeters
    • GPS
    • Aerial surveys
    • and more!
  • work with Greek and Latin texts in their original languages.

Archaeologists are essential for recovering cultural heritage, preventing looting, and restoring our links to the past.

Coursework at PLU

If you’re interested in Classical Archaeology, check out the following courses!

In Classics

  1. CLAS 241 Introduction to Egyptology
  2. CLAS 241 J-Term in Greece
  3. CLAS 241 J-Term in Italy
  4. CLAS/HIST 321 Greek Civilization
  5. CLAS/HIST 322 Roman Civilization
  6. CLAS 350 Classical and Comparative Mythology

 


In Anthropology

  1. ANTH 103 Introduction to Archaeology and World Pre-History
  2. ANTH 365 Prehistoric Environment and Technology:  Lab Methods in Archaeology
  3. ANTH 370 The Archaeology of Ancient Empires
  4. ANTH 465 Archaeology and Field Experience

 


In History

  1. HIST 107 Western Civilizations
  2. HIST 227 The Vikings
  3. CLAS/HIST 321 Greek Civilization
  4. CLAS/HIST 322 Roman Civilization

 


In Religion

  1. RELI 330 Old Testament Studies (when dealing with Biblical Archaeology)

Digs and Fieldwork

Check out the following links and sites for digs and field work in the Near East, Mediterranean, and North America. Near-Eastern Dig Opportunities (Israel, Jordan, etc.)

Fieldschools in America

Shovel Bums Archaeology and Anthropology Field Schools

Professional Societies

Classical Studies Major--44 Credits (11 courses): Focus on Greek or Latin!

The Classical Studies major is intended for students who are interested in the Classical world on its own or in relation to Art, English, History, Philosophy, Religion, or more!  Classical Studies is an excellent major for those who are thinking about Law School or Medical School. The Classical Studies Major requires:

  1. 4 courses (16 credits) in either Greek or Latin (usually fulfilled by intensive 111-112, and then 212 and 311)
  2. 2 courses (8 credits) in the other language — Latin or Greek — (usually fulfilled by 111-112)
  3. 4 courses (16 credits) in any course with the CLAS designation, any cross-listed course, or another course approved by the program director.
  4. 1 course (4 credits) CLAS 499 Capstone
    • Under consultation with both program directors, CLAS 499 may be combined with another capstone in your second major.  But be sure to discuss this first with the directors of both programs to see if there are special requirements!!
  5. NOTE that many of these courses fulfill your GEN ED requirements!  With careful scheduling, you can fulfill LT, RC, RG, C, PH and your language requirement through this major.
  6. The pre-approved courses include:
    • ARTD 180: History of Western Art I
    • CLAS/ENGL 231: Masterpieces of European Literature
    • CLAS 241/341: Special Topics in Ancient Literature and Culture
    • CLAS/HIST 326: A History of Medicine: Antiquity to European Renaissance
    • CLAS/HIST 321: Greek Civilization
    • CLAS/HIST 322: Roman Civilization
    • CLAS 350: Classical and Comparative Mythology
    • IHON 111: Authority and Discovery
    • PHIL 331: Ancient Philosophy
    • RELI 211: Religion & Literature of the Hebrew Bible (4)
    • RELI 212: Religion & Literature of the New Testament (4)
    • RELI 220: Early Christianity
    • RELI 330: Hebrew Bible Studies
    • RELI 331: New Testament Studies
    • Approved independent study courses
    • Approved Study Away courses

SUGGESTED 4-YEAR PLAN

GREEK FOCUS (3 years, doable in 2)

FALL J-TERM SPRING
1st year
  1. GREK 111-112
  2. GREK 111-112
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1.  CLAS
  1. GREK 212
  2. CLAS
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
2nd year
  1. LATN 111-112
  2. LATN 111-112
  3. GREK 311
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. CLAS
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
3rd year
  1. CLAS
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. CLAS 499 Capstone
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
4th year
  1. OTHER
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER

LATIN FOCUS (3 years, doable in 2)

FALL J-TERM SPRING
1st year
  1. LATN 111-112
  2. LATN 111-112
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. CLAS
  1. LATN 212
  2. CLAS
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
2nd year
  1. GREK 111-112
  2. GREK 111-112
  3. LATN 311
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. CLAS
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
3rd year
  1. CLAS
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. CLAS 499 Capstone
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
4th year
  1. OTHER
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER

Classical Languages Major--44 credits (11 courses): Focus on Greek or Latin!

The Classical Languages major is intended for those who love languages, who find the Classical world fascinating, or who intend graduate school in Classics or in a related discipline (for example, Ancient History, Early Christianity). The Classical Languages Major requires:

  1. 10 courses (40 credits) total in both Greek and Latin, with no fewer than 2 courses (8 credits) in either language. These may include CLAS 241/341 J-Term in Greece or Italy.
  2. 1 course (4 credits) CLAS 499 Capstone
    • Under consultation with both program directors, CLAS 499 may be combined with another capstone in your second major.  But be sure to discuss this first with the directors of both programs to see if there are special requirements!!

GREEK FOCUS (4 years, doable in 3)

FALL J-TERM SPRING
1st year
  1. GREK 111-112
  2. GREK 111-112
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. CLAS 241/341
  1. GREK 212
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
2nd year
  1. LATN 111-112
  2. LATN 111-112
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. GREK 312
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
3rd year
  1. LATN or GREK 311
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. GREK or LATN 312 or Ind. Study
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
4th year
  1. GREK or LATN 311 or Ind. Study
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. CLAS 499 Capstone
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER

LATIN FOCUS (4 years, doable in 3)

FALL J-TERM SPRING
1st year
  1. LATIN 111-112
  2. LATN 111-112
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. CLAS 241/341
  1. LATN 212
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
2nd year
  1. GREK 111-112
  2. GREK 111-112
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. LATN 312
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
3rd year
  1. LATN or GREK 311
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. GREK or LATN 312 or Ind. Study
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
4th year
  1. GREK or LATN 311 or Ind. Study
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. CLAS 499 Capstone
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER

Classical Studies Minor--24 credits (6 classes)

The Classical Studies minor is for those students who have an interest in the Classical World, but whose schedules are so full they do not permit a major.  Because so many courses count for CLAS, the Classical Studies minor is ideal for those with majors in English, History, Philosophy, and Religion, or who are doing IHON and a major that requires language option 1.  For example, an English major who takes Latin or Greek as their language and Classical and Comparative Mythology as an LT course is only one course away from a minor.  A History major who takes Greek or Latin as their language and takes Greek Civ. and Roman Civ. as history courses has complied the minor! The Classical Studies Minor requires:

  1. 4 courses (16 credits) in Latin or Greek
  2. 2 courses (8 credits) in CLAS or related disciplines, which include:
    • ARTD 180: History of Western Art I
    • CLAS/ENGL 231: Masterpieces of European Literature
    • CLAS 241/341: Special Topics in Ancient Literature and Culture
    • CLAS/HIST 326: A History of Medicine: Antiquity to European Renaissance
    • CLAS/HIST 321: Greek Civilization
    • CLAS/HIST 322: Roman Civilization
    • CLAS 350: Classical and Comparative Mythology
    • IHON 111: Authority and Discovery
    • PHIL 331: Ancient Philosophy
    • RELI 211: Religion & Literature of the Hebrew Bible (4)
    • RELI 212: Religion & Literature of the New Testament (4)
    • RELI 220: Early Christianity
    • RELI 330: Hebrew Bible Studies
    • RELI 331: New Testament Studies
    • Approved independent study courses
    • Approved Study Away courses

SUGGESTED MINOR SCHEDULE (2 years)

FALL J-TERM SPRING
1st year
  1. GREK or LATN 111-112
  2. [same as above]
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. CLAS 241/341
  1. GREK or LATN 212
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
2nd year
  1. GREK or LATN 311
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER
  1. OTHER
  1. CLAS
  2. OTHER
  3. OTHER
  4. OTHER