Wang Center

  • The Wang Center at PLU sponsors study away programs on all seven continents, offering course credit in very many departments and majors. These courses are led by your faculty and filled by your peers at PLU.
  • Courses range from full semester to just J-Term. For specific information about which courses are being offered this year, check out the Wang Center website.

CLAS 241/341 J-Term in Greece

CLAS 241/341 J-Term in Greece

CLAS 241/341 explores ancient Greek life and culture as it is preserved in modern Greece—both in ruins and in the contemporary experience.  We investigate how the Greeks came to prominence in the Mediterranean, the effects they had on each other and on neighboring civilizations, and their legacy as it lives on today. Our class:

  •  explores Athens, the cities of the Peloponnese, and Crete;
  • sees and investigates Greek ruins and the institutions those ruins presume;
  • develops first-hand knowledge of ancient Greek living conditions and culture and how they compare to contemporary Greek life;
  • extrapolates from the Greek experience(s) to the American experience:  what can we learn about ourselves from studying these people and their descendants?  Are the modern Greeks the descendants of the ancient Greeks?  In what ways and in what ways not?  What makes a democracy, an oligarchy, and an empire, and what are the effects of these constitutions on their neighbors and subjects?  Etc.

Throughout it all we work closely with the local experts at College Year in Athens.  Their professors and professionals are classicists, historians, archaeologists, and on-site staff whom we have to thank not only for accommodations and classroom facilities, but lectures and guided tours in their areas of special expertise. Note: Can be taken for Greek language credit by students coming out of GREK 111-112. Click here to see the Classics in Greece J-Term Flyer! Link to community standards Link to 2015 syllabus Check out our course blog for Greece 2015!

CLAS 241/341 J-Term in Italy

CLAS 241/341 J-Term in Italy

The course provides an overview of ancient Roman life and culture as it is preserved in Italy—both in ruins and in the contemporary experience. We will investigate how Rome exploited urban and rural environments as well as the pre-Roman and neighboring Italic peoples, to what extent Roman practices were sustainable and how they compare with contemporary movements. Students will:

  • explore the cities of Orvieto and l’Aquila, the town of Fontecchio, the countryside of Abruzzo, ancient Pompeii, and, of course, Rome;
  • see and investigate Roman ruins and the institutions those ruins presume;
  • develop first-hand knowledge of ancient Roman living conditions and culture and how they compare to contemporary Italian life;
  • compare the slow food and cittàslow movements to ancient Roman practices of agriculture and urban living;
  • apply the two axes of interpretation: “urban vs. rural”, “ancient vs. modern” to the sites, environment, practices, and culture;
  • extrapolate from the Roman and Italian experience(s) to the American experience: what can we learn about ourselves from studying these people and their descendants? Are the modern Italians the descendants of the Romans? In what ways and in what ways not? What makes an empire and what are the effects of an empire on its neighbors and subjects? Etc.

In the first module of the course, the class will work closely with the Italian firm “Italian Landscape Exploration (ILEX)” and its founder, Alessio Di Giulio. This organization studies the problems of sustainability, economic development, and environmental changes and proposes culturally sensitive, economically viable policy solutions to improve human and natural conditions. In the second module, the class will work with the University of Washington Rome Center, which will provide apartments, classrooms and lecture space, a student computer lab, and general support. Note:  Can be taken for Latin language credit by students coming out of LATN 111-112. Add link to sample syllabus.

College Year in Athens

The College Year in Athens is a study-away program based in Athens, Greece.  It offers summer, semester, and year-long courses of study in a variety of disciplines including:

  • Art and Archaeology
  • Environmental Studies
  • Ethnography
  • History
  • Ancient Greek, Latin, and Modern Greek
  • Literature
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Religion
  • Urban Planning and Sustainability

As you can see, their course offerings can benefit many different majors, including Classics but extending throughout the University. Coursework includes site visits to the important locales of Athens, field trips and optional trips throughout Greece, while allowing time for individual travel, too. PLU accepts CYA courses for credit!  Just ask your advisor and the chairs of the departments to which you would like to transfer courses.

Archaeological Digs and Fieldwork

Check out the following links and sites for digs and field work in the Near East, Mediterranean, and North America. Near-Eastern Dig Opportunities (Israel, Jordan, etc.)

Fieldschools in America

Shovel Bums Archaeology and Anthropology Field Schools

Professional Societies