News

PLU’s Black Student Union Holds ‘Die-In’ To Show Solidarity

Posted by: Date: April 7, 2015
PLU's Black Student Union has scheduled a Die-in protest for April 8 to continue the discussion on racial inequality begun after events in Ferguson, Missouri. (Photo: John Froschauer/PLU)

PLU's Black Student Union has scheduled a Die-in protest for April 8 to continue the discussion on racial inequality begun after events in Ferguson, Missouri. (Photo: John Froschauer/PLU)

By Matthew Salzano '18
PLU Marketing & Communications

TACOMA, Wash. (April 7, 2015)—The Black Student Union of Pacific Lutheran University is holding a ``Die-In`` protest at 10:30 a.m. April 8 in the Diversity Center.

All members of the Pacific Lutheran University community are invited to attend—and lie down, as if dead—in response to  lives lost as a result of police brutality.

Shelondra Harris ’17, vice president of Black Student Union, said this event is a response to events leading up to and following the violence in Ferguson, Missouri.

“The death of Mike Brown was not the first instance that fueled us to make a change; however, it shook the nation so much that we thought it was a good platform to pursue,” Harris said. “Ferguson embodies the pain of the black community and symbolizes our solidarity.”

Students, alumni and community members who are not able to make it to campus Wednesday are invited to participate by reflecting on their privileges throughout society.

“As a Black Student Union, we recognize that systematic change will not be made overnight or even with this event,” Harris said. “[The Die-in] is a demonstration to continue the discussion on racial inequality on campus. Continuing a critical dialogue is another step that can help gain solidarity on campus.”

According to a 2014 USA Today story, a white police officer killed a black person twice a week from 2005 to 2012. This statistic, in the opinion of Harris, transcends any fading media focus.

“Just because Ferguson may not be a hot topic any more in the media or on campus does not mean that it is not within the black community,” she said. “This a reality we are forced to live.”