Seth Dowland

Assistant Professor of Religion

Seth-Dowland Assistant Professor of American Religious History
Blomquist House - Room 8
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
9:00 am - 10:00 am
5 Years
  • Professional
  • Personal


  • Ph.D., American Religions, Duke University, 2007
  • M.A., American Religions, Duke University, 2004
  • B.A. with distinction, Religious Studies & History, University of Virginia, 2001

Areas of Emphasis or Expertise

  • American Christianity
  • U.S. Religious History
  • Evangelicalism
  • Gender and Religion
  • Religion and Politics


  • Family Values: Gender, Authority, and the Rise of the Christian Right, (University of Pennsylvania Press, October 30, 2015) : View Book

Selected Presentations

  • American Historical Association, Respondent: “American Evangelicals Looking Abroad” panel, New York (January 2015)
  • American Academy of Religion, Pacific Northwest Regional Meeting, Evolving Notions of Christian Manhood in the YMCA, co-presenter Clayton Bracht, Calgary (May 2014)
  • American Society for Church History Spring Meeting, Southern Baptist Apostate: Bill Clinton’s Fight with the Religious Right, Portland (April 2013)
  • American Society for Church History Spring Meeting, Respondent: “How the Bible Works: Scripture and the Body in Nineteenth Century Religion” panel, Portland (April 2013)


  • Karen Hille Phillips Regency Advancement Award, Pacific Lutheran University (2015-16)
  • Kelmer-Roe Faculty-Student Research Award, Pacific Lutheran University (with Clayton Bracht) (2013-14)
  • Award for Excellence in Teaching Writing, Duke University (2009)
  • Research Travel Grants, Thompson Writing Program, Duke University (2008, 2009, & 2010)
  • Louisville Institute Dissertation Fellowship (2006-07)

Professional Memberships/Organizations


Seth Dowland teaches courses on American Christianity, Islam in America, and the intersection of religion and politics in American history. He also teaches courses about gender in American religions and about religion and violence for PLU’s interdisciplinary programs (Women’s and Gender Studies, International Honors Program, and the First-Year Experience Program). His research focuses on the intersection of religion, gender, and American politics in the twentieth century. His book, Family Values and the Rise of the Christian Right was published in 2015 by the University of Pennsylvania Press. He is currently working on a project about the history of Christian masculinity in the United States.