School of Arts and Communication

2016 SOAC Focus Series


Past themes have explored compassion (2012), empowerment (2013),  entrepreneurship (2014), and perspective (2015). Gain a new perspective and join us in Spring 2015 for this dynamic series. Watch for event announcements early this fall.

Wednesday, February 17, at 5pm


Food and Narrative

Fireside Lounge, Garfield Book Store • Free

Food is a common thread in life and yet, it is used more and more to construct distinct identity. It’s an integral part of our culture, history, family tradition, hospitality and personal narrative. What we eat, what and how we feed others, where we grocery shop, how we construct diet limitations, and what recipes we use, tell a story about ourselves. This spring, communication professors Justin Eckstein and Amy Young, along with special guests, expose food as a storytelling device.

Wednesday, March 9, at 5pm


Book Arts in the Pacific Northwest

University Gallery, Ingram Hall • Free • Opening Reception

The Pacific Northwest is nationally known for its strong community of book artists. This invitational exhibit features notable regional artists whose work utilizes the book. As part of the 2015 FOCUS Series, we explore the book’s long history as a vessel for stories in new and contemporary ways.

Wednesday, March 23, at 8pm


Sandström: St. Matthew Passion

Lagerquist Concert Hall, Mary Baker Russell Music Center

St. Matthew Passion is a traditional part of the Lutheran liturgy each spring. Sven-David Sandström’s setting is a thoughtful reimagining of St. Matthew Passion that honors both the Bach setting that inspired it and the contemporary audiences for whom it is intended. Performed by the Choir of the West and Choral Union with University Symphony Orchestra.

General Admission $15 • Senior (55+) and Alumni $10 • PLU and Students $5

Thursday, April 28, at 6:30pm


These Four Years

Studio Theater, Karen Hille Phillips Center • Free

In this documentary, MediaLab explores questions of happiness and education: Is a four-year degree still the route to self-fulfillment and wellbeing? And, if college is not accessible to all, then what are the implications–for individuals and society at large– for those who do not have a four-year college education?

Past SOAC Focus Series Themes