Course List

Workshops are offered through the following strands:
Instruction
Assessment
Diversity and Inclusion
Adult Learning
Special Education

Reaching Our Students: Analysis of Our Assumptions and Learning Theory (January 11 and 25, 2020) (Adult Learning)

The purpose of this seminar is to help us improve our craft of teaching by thinking through how learning theory can inform our practice. Each of us carries with us assumptions about how people learn and what constitutes adequate learning in various situations. These assumptions come from our cultural backgrounds and upbringing, from our own “apprenticeship of observation” (Lortie, 1975) as students in schools, and from our continuing work as educators of children and adults. These assumptions paired with who we are as individual learners often influences how we teach. Exploring and creating a broad understanding of theories of learning and the development of expertise can help us see multiple ways to reach our students. Readings and online posts prior to our first F2F session will set us up to begin. Session 1 (F2F) will focus on theories of learning and applying them to the content we teach. Online work, in between sessions, involves a deeper investigation of learning theory and our assumptions around the development of expertise, preparing theoretical sketches to observe theories in action (identifying student success and struggles and modifying lessons to create more access points for all types of learners), and beginning to investigate our own modes of learning. Session 2 (F2F) involves sharing and learning together around those theoretical sketches and working more with our own assumptions and ways of learning. These sessions will bring it all together around who I am as an educator, how I teach, and how I can reach more students.

Effective Course Design: Starting with the End in Mind (February 8 and 29, 2020) (Instruction or Assessment)

This course will help instructors learn how to design new courses or redesign existing courses so that learning outcomes, assessment, instruction, and activities are aligned. During our first onsite meeting, we will examine how to write precise, targeted learning outcomes. Then, we will discuss how to plan assessments, instruction, and activities that align to your learning outcomes. During the time between meetings, participants will develop their course plan and receive feedback from instructors and peers. During our second onsite meeting, we will discuss strategies to make course design more effective, and participants will consider how to use assessment to revise course planning during and after they teach their courses.

Beyond PowerPoint: Structuring engaging lectures in a community college class (Spring 2020) (Instruction)

This course is designed for instructors who want to make their lectures more engaging for students in their class. This course will focus on identifying specific characteristics of engaging lectures and specific practices instructors can use to enhance the lecture format. Strategies will include how to incorporate characteristics of performance into lectures and how to leverage student voice and feedback to make lectures more engaging. The course will be divided into three distinct sections. The first section will cover one day of class and will be focused on the content of delivering engaging lectures. The second will span several weeks during which students will work independently to incorporate some of the learned strategies into their lectures. Students will video record a lecture and will bring it back to class for the third section to reflect on how effective those strategies were and to establish next steps in their practice.

“Groupworthy,” not parallel completion: Fostering engaging collaborative learning in the classroom (Spring 2020) (Instruction)

Collaboration is one of the strongest tools instructors have in their teaching toolbox to help students more deeply learn the required content. However, many times instructors are unintentional about the ways they use student collaboration, amounting to collaboration that looks more like parallel completion of a common task than collaborative and creative problem solving. This course will focus on ways instructors can better structure groupwork in their courses and classes to deepen student understanding of content. Course content will draw from the work of Lotan and Cohen (1997) and Lotan’s (2003) concept of “groupworthy” tasks to identify ways instructors can create more rigorous collaborative learning activities and more equitable group work routines. The course will be divided into three distinct sections. The first section will cover one day of class and will be focused on how instructors can better design collaborative learning in their courses. The second will span several weeks during which students will work independently to incorporate some of the principles of collaborative learning into their classes. Students will collect relevant data (e.g. video recording of students working together, student artifacts, teaching artifacts, etc.) and will bring it/them back to class for the third section to reflect on how effective those strategies were and to establish next steps in their practice.