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DCHAT Podcast: PLU Dean of Natural Sciences Matt Smith answers alumni questions

Posted by: Date: February 1, 2017 In: , ,
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TACOMA, WASH. (Feb. 1, 2017)- The fourth episode of Pacific Lutheran University’s DCHAT podcast features a discussion with Matt Smith, Associate Professor of Biology, Undergraduate Research Program Director and dean of the PLU Division of Natural Sciences. An expert in the fields of neurobiology and vertebrate physiology, Dr. Smith has served as natural sciences dean since 2011. He previously chaired the biology department from 2007-2011. 

DCHAT is a new interview-based podcast featuring PLU academic deans and highlighted by questions submitted by PLU alumni. Special thanks to the following alumni for submitting questions for this episode: Matthew Peters ’14, Nicholas Evan Larkey ’12, and Stena Troyer ’12.

Conversation Highlights:

3:25- What natural sciences departments are preparing students to do after graduation.

7:15- The difference in studying the natural sciences at a university like PLU versus a large research institution.

11:50- Why PLU has been very successful placing students into medical school.

13:40- How the new Carol Sheffels Quigg Greenhouse has been integrated into the biology curriculum.

15:28- Incorporating new technology into the natural sciences at PLU.

17:56- How the Division of Natural Sciences is taking action to combat climate change.

19:32- How alumni can get involved with the natural sciences departments.

PLEASE NOTE: The Rachel Carson Science, Technology & Society Annual Lecture is on March 8 at 7:30 p.m. in PLU’s Scandinavian Cultural Center.

PLU dean of natural sciences Matt Smith in the KNKX studio on campus at PLU
PLU dean of natural sciences Matt Smith in the KNKX studio on campus at Pacific Lutheran University.

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