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NAIS 111: Interconnections (2) A weekly meeting with program students and faculty to discuss progress, challenges and the intersection of Indigenous approaches and the university experience. Students are encouraged to attend for no credit in subsequent semesters after having taken the course.
Required Course. Counts towards the “Core Courses in Native American and Indigenous Studies” requirement.
Meets R 3:40-5:25.
Instructor Nicole Juliano (Diversity Center).

NAIS 250: Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies—A (4) Introduces students to the scope, methodologies and intellectual traditions of Native American and Indigenous Studies, focusing on such topics as Indigeneity, settler colonialism, sovereignty, resilience and the intersections of Indigeneity with gender and sexuality. May include community-based service learning components.
Required Course. Counts towards the “Core Courses in Native American and Indigenous Studies requirement.
Meets MWF 1:45-3:30.
Professor Troy Storfjell (Languages and Literatures).

SOLU 101: Southern Lushootseed: Introduction to Oral Language (4) Introduction to Southern Lushootseed Language. Fundamentals of sound system, grammar, and basic speaking and listening comprehension, as well as cultural dynamics of the language and its users.
Required Course. Counts towards the “Northwest Language and Worldview” requirement.
Meets W 3:40-5:25 and Sat. 1 to 3.
Instructor Nancy Jo Bob (Languages and Literatures).

IHON 258: Colonization in the Americas—A (4) This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, with emphasis on cross-cultural and societal connections. Contextual readings and discussions consider the changing dynamics of conquest, enslavement, and colonialism and their reciprocal relationships to resistance, freedom, and revolution, as well as the legacy of colonialism in our daily lives, political forms, and ways of thinking. With particular attention on the places that would become the United States, Mexico, and Haiti, and on how these developments were connected to changes in Europe and Africa, we will study the legacies of racism and the kinds of accommodations and conflicts that have shaped the changing political, economic, and social relations in the Americas.
Elective. Counts towards “Electives” requirement.
Meets TR 11:50-1:35.
Professor Rebekah Mergenthal (History).

ANTH 190/192/491: Practicing Anthropology: Makah Culture Past and Present—A, SO (4) Study of Makah culture through archaeology and history and by interacting with the Makah. Active and service learning in Neah Bay, visiting the Makah Nation.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Optional Course/Elective. Counts towards either the “Northwest Language and Worldview” or the “Electives” requirement.
Professor Jorden Levy (Anthropology).

HIST 348: Lewis and Clark: History and Memory—A, SO (4) Examines the Lewis and Clark expedition of 1804-1806 and its broader impact, including its costs and consequences for both the expanding U.S. and the people affected by it. Course emphasizes Native American perspectives of the expedition and how it has been depicted and commemorated in U.S. popular culture.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor.
Elective. Counts towards “Electives” requirement.
Professor Rebekah Mergenthal (History).

RELI 393: Native Traditions of the Pacific Northwest—A, RG (4)
This course introduces students to indigenous cultures of the Pacific Northwest, by focusing on three culture groups in particular: The Nuu-chah-nulth, the Schitsu’umsh (also known as the Coeur d’Alene) and the Coast Salish. This J-term course is a blended course, which means most of our instruction will take place on-line. We will gather together in person for three or four day-long field trips visiting with local tribal communities. On these excursions we’ll speak with tribal leaders to learn about food sovereignty, health and healing, storytelling, and visual arts. The final week of the course will be devoted to writing and research, as students continue their learning in an independent project. Final drafts of individual research projects will be gathered and shared on our class website.
Elective. Counts towards the “Electives” requirement.

Professor Suzanne Crawford O’Brien (Religion).

NORD 286: Sámi Culture in Global Indigenous Contexts—A or C Through a variety of media students will be introduced to the Indigenous Sámi of northern Scandinavia and Russia, and will develop an understanding of Sámi culture, history, and worldviews as well as of contemporary issues concerning the Sámi and other Indigenous peoples, including peoples in the United States. In English.
Elective. Counts towards the “Electives” requirement.

Professor Troy Storfjell (Languages and Literatures).

NAIS 112: Interconnections (2) A weekly meeting with program students and faculty to discuss progress, challenges and the intersection of Indigenous approaches and the university experience. Students are encouraged to attend for no credit in subsequent semesters after having taken the course.
Required Course. Counts towards the “Core Courses in Native American and Indigenous Studies” requirement.

Instructor Nicole Juliano (Diversity Center).

NAIS 230: Indigenous Creation Narratives of the Americas—LT, A or C (4) Through encounters with a variety of creation narratives, literature, film and visual art from native peoples of the Americas, students examine changing relationships with the land, the cosmos and other living beings.
Elective. Counts towards the “Electives” requirement.

Professor Carmiña Palerm (Languages and Literatures).

SOLU 102: Southern Lushootseed: Oral Language Dialog (4) Continuing development of basic vocabulary, grammar and speaking, with additional emphasis on dialogue. This course also further develops students’ understanding of the cultural contexts of the Southern Lushootseed language.
Optional Course. Counts towards the “Northwest Language and Worldview” requirement.

Instructor Nancy Jo Bob (Languages and Literatures).

HIST 351: History of Western and Pacific Northwestern U.S.—A, SO (4) How “the West” was defined and geographically situated has changed greatly over time. Yet, “the West” – as both a place and an idea – has played a critical role in the development of the American nation. Course explores historiography and the evolving definitions and understandings of region in the United States.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor.
Elective. Counts towards the “Electives” requirement.

Professor Rebekah Mergenthal (History).

Confirmed courses for the 2019-2020 Academic Year:

NAIS 111: Interconnections (4)

SOLU 101: Southern Lushootseed: Introduction to Oral Language (4)

RELI 236: Native American Religious Traditions—A, RG (4) Introduction to a variety of Native American religious traditions, emphasizing the way in which religion works to construct identity, promote individual collective well being, and acts as a means of responding to colonialism. Approaches the topic using academic religious studies’ methodologies.
Elective. Counts towards the “Electives” requirement.

ANTH 190/192/491: Practicing Anthropology: Makah Culture Past and Present—A, SO (4)

HIST 348: Lewis and Clark: History and Memory—A, SO (4)

NAIS 112: Interconnections (4)

NAIS 230: Creation Narratives of the Americas (4)

SOLU 102: Southern Lushootseed: Oral Language Dialog (4)

NAIS 250: Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies—A (4)

RELI 227: Native American Theologies—A, RG (4)