Student Learning Outcomes in General Education

Religion Courses Skills

Spring 2012

Skills

Students in lower-division Religion courses should accomplish:

  1. Basic reading: accurate reporting on texts, beginning to identify an author’s assumptions and the structures of arguments
  2. Basic writing: writing a short paper (5-7 pages) for clear expression and understanding in lower division courses; command of basic grammar, spelling, and form; capacity to describe a text accurately; capacity to relate one’s own ideas clearly and structure an interpretation or argument
  3. Basic communication: capacity for oral communication and presentation skills in small group and large group settings
  4. Basic thinking: interacting critically with course material; becoming aware of one’s own assumptions and biases and how these inform one’s understanding of religion’s texts, practices, histories, theologies, and/or ethics
  5. Beginning facility with academic tools and methods within a disciplinary area (e.g., contextual study of texts, practices, histories, theologies, and/or ethics)

In addition to the aforementioned, students in upper-division Religion courses should be able to:

  1. Reading: Read, critically and empathetically, the works of scholars in the field of religion; identify and describe the vision, theme, or argument in primary and secondary sources
  2. Writing: Demonstrate advanced undergraduate writing abilities, including a longer paper (15-20 pages); construct a well-organized research paper which offers a persuasive argument
  3. Communication: Demonstrate competence in discussing and evaluating complex ideas
  4. Thinking: Demonstrate their mastery of factual and conceptual frameworks within the field of religion; expand and deepen one’s description and interpretation of texts by locating them within their larger social, cultural, and geographic contexts; demonstrate, in writing and speaking, their assumptions and biases
  5. Receive and respond to constructive criticisms of their written and verbal presentations
  6. Use, with growing sophistication, the scholarly tools and methods of the discipline; identify and pursue a question or problem independently, using the library and other sources.

Knowledge

Lower Division

  1. Method: to know academic tools and methods within a disciplinary area.
  2. Content: to be familiar with thinkers, texts, practices, histories, theologies, and/or ethics which shape the academic study of religion within a disciplinary area or on a topic in the field of religion.
  3. Relevance: to recognize religion’s roles in shaping human life, culture, and history.

Upper Division

  1. Method: understand academic tools and methods within disciplinary contexts.
  2. Content: understand thinkers, texts, practices, histories, theologies, and/or ethics which shape the academic study of religion.
  3. Relevance: understand religion’s roles in shaping human life, culture, and history.
  4. Engage: integrate the works of scholars of religion and factual and conceptual information using appropriate tools and methods on a single topic.

Values and Beliefs

  1. To develop intellectual humility and critical empathy as they learn from a variety of religious perspectives which may differ from their own.
  2. To develop the ability to think about the meaning of human existence from the perspective of Christian Traditions and Global Religious Traditions.
  3. To develop the ability to engage in constructive dialog regarding questions of religious faith and values as they are encountered in local and global cultures.

Majors

The student who majors in religion will thus be able to demonstrate the capacity to:

  1. Reading: Read, critically and empathetically, the works of scholars in the field of religion; identify and describe the vision, theme, or argument in primary and secondary sources
  2. Writing: Demonstrate advanced undergraduate writing abilities, including a longer paper (15-20 pages); construct a well-organized research paper which offers a persuasive argument
  3. Communication: Demonstrate competence in discussing and evaluating complex ideas
  4. Thinking: Demonstrate their mastery of factual and conceptual frameworks within the field of religion; expand and deepen one’s description and interpretation of texts by locating them within their larger social, cultural, and geographic contexts; demonstrate, in writing and speaking, their assumptions and biases
  5. Receive and respond to constructive criticisms of their written and verbal presentations
  6. Use, with growing sophistication, the scholarly tools and methods of the discipline; identify and pursue a question or problem independently, using the library and other sources.
  7. Demonstrate their mastery of factual and conceptual frameworks within the field of religion
  8. Majors are required to publicly present their study and research in an engaging and persuasive manner
  9. Demonstrate all Knowledge Learning Objectives expected at the upper-division level
  10. Be able to discuss their education in Religion in relation to the Values and Beliefs objectives