Catalog 2013-2014

Chemistry

253.535.7530
www.chem.plu.edu
chair@chem.plu.edu

Chemistry involves the study of matter at the atomic and molecular level. Concepts and tools of chemistry are used to study the composition, structure, reactivity and energy changes of materials in the world around us. At PLU, students will find a chemistry program that supports their interests, whether in the chemistry of natural products, the environment, biological systems, polymers, or inorganic compounds, and that supports their educational goals, whether toward graduate study, the medical and health professions, biotechnology, education, business, or as a complement to other studies in the natural sciences, humanities, or social sciences. For good reason, chemistry is often called "the central science."

The Chemistry Department's courses, curriculum, faculty, and facilities are approved by the American Chemical Society.

Student have hands-on use of sophisticated instrumentation in coursework and research with faculty, including 500 MHZ Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FTNMR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP AES), spectrofluorometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, laser light scattering instrumentation, gas chromatography with mass selective detection (GCMS), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ion trap mass selective detection (LCMS), and Linux workstations for molecular modeling and computational chemistry.

Faculty research projects involve undergraduate participation.

CHEMISTRY MAJOR DECLARATION PROCESS
  • Consultation with chemistry faculty member required.
  • Declare major early and preferably by completion of CHEM 331.
  • Transfer students must consult with a department advisor no later than the start of the junior year.
  • A minimum grade of C- in all courses required by the major; overall chemistry GPA of 2.00 or higher.
  • A minimum grade of C in courses required by the minor.
  • Departmental Honors requires a 3.50 overall GPA in the major; and other qualifications as described below.
  • A grade of C- or higher is required for all prerequisite courses. Students may enroll in courses that have prerequisites only if they have completed the prerequisite course(s) with a grade of C- or higher. This grade requirement applies to prerequisite courses offered by the Chemistry Department and to supporting courses offered by other departments.
BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
Major in Chemistry
47 semester hours in Foundation courses, plus CHEM 342
Foundation Courses (47 semester hours)
  • Chemistry Courses
    29 semester hours
    • CHEM 115, 116, 320, 331, 332, 333, 334 (or 336), 341, 343, 499A, 499B
  • Additional Courses
    18 semester hours
    • MATH 151, 152
    • PHYS 153, 154, 163, 164
  • CHEM 342
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE
Major in Chemistry

47 semester hours in Foundation courses and selection of emphasis area with subsequent requirements
Foundation Courses
47 semester hours
  • Chemistry Courses
    29 semester hours
    • CHEM 115, 116, 320, 331, 332, 333, 334 (or 336), 341, 343, 499A, 499B
  • Additional Courses
    18 semester hours
    • MATH 151, 152
    • PHYS 153, 154, 163, 164
EMPHASIS AREAS
General Emphasis
14 semester hours beyond the Foundation courses (see listing above)
  • CHEM 342, 344
  • CHEM 405 or 450 or 456; CHEM 410, 420

The General Emphasis can lead to American Chemical Society Certification if the following courses are included: CHEM 403, 450 and either CHEM 405, 440 or 456.

Biochemistry Emphasis
29 semester hours beyond the Foundation courses (see listing above)

B.S. in Chemistry with Biochemistry Emphasis is often done as a double major with Biology

  • American Chemical Society Certification for Biochemistry requires CHEM 342 and 450.
  • CHEM 403, 405, 410, 420
  • BIOL 225, 226
  • 4 semester hours from: CHEM 342 or BIOL 330, 342, 358, 442, 445, 448, or 453
Chemical-Physics Emphasis
26 semester hours beyond the Foundation courses (see listing above)
  • CHEM 342, 344
  • MATH 253
  • PHYS 331, 332, 336, 356
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE

GENERALIZED CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM
First Year: Fall Semester
  • CHEM 115
  • Freshman Inquiry or Writing Seminar (and/or BIOL 225 for students interested in B.S. in Chemistry, Biochemistry Emphasis)
  • MATH 151
  • PHED 100 or other activity course
  • A General Education Program Element course
First Year: Spring Semester
  • CHEM 116
  • Freshman Inquiry or Writing Seminar and/or BIOL 226
  • MATH 152
  • PHED 100 or other activity course
Second Year: Fall Semester
  • CHEM 331,333
  • PHYS 153, 163
  • Two additional courses
Second Year: Spring Semester
  • CHEM 332, 334 (or 336), 320, 410
  • PHYS 154, 164
Third Year: Fall Semester
  • CHEM 341, 343, 403
  • General Education Program course(s)
  • Elective
Third Year: Spring Semester
  • CHEM 342, 344
  • For B.S. in Chemistry with Biochemistry Emphasis, BIOL 330, 342, 358, 442, 445, 448, 453 may be substituted for CHEM 342 and 344.
  • CHEM 405 (for Biochemistry Emphasis)
  • CHEM 410 (if not taken in the second year)
  • General Education Program course(s)
  • Elective
Fourth Year: Fall Semester
  • CHEM 499A
  • Alternate Year Advanced CHEM Elective (for ACS Certification and/or B.S.)
  • Electives
Fourth Year: Spring Semester
  • CHEM 420, 499B
  • Electives
Alternate Year: Advanced Courses

In the third or fourth year and if pre- or co-requisite requirements are met, B.S. students enroll in CHEM 450 (required for all ACS Certification options) or 456 (or 405 in Spring Term after 403).

Refer to the Division of Natural Sciences section of this catalog for other beginning curriculum options. Students interested in the Bachelor of Science with Biochemistry Emphasis should start biology in the fall of the first or second year. Physics should be started in either the first or the second year, so as to prepare students for upper-division chemistry courses.

Departmental Honors

In recognition of outstanding work the designation of Departmental Honors may be granted to Bachelor of Science graduates by vote of the faculty of the chemistry department, based on the student’s performance in the following areas:

  • Course Work: A minimum 3.50 grade point average in all chemistry courses.

  • Written Work: At time of declaration of the chemistry major, all copies of outstanding work (e.g., laboratory, seminar and research projects) need to be maintained by the student for later faculty evaluation for departmental honors.

  • Oral Communication: Students must evidence ability to communicate effectively as indicated by the sum of their participation in class discussion, seminars, help session leadership, and teaching assistantship work.

  • Independent chemistry-related activities: Positive considerations include the extent and quality of extracurricular work done in background reading, independent study, and research; assisting in laboratory preparation, teaching, or advising; any other chemistry- related employment, on campus or elsewhere; and participation in campus and professional chemistry-related organizations.
The departmental honors designation will appear on the transcript of a student graduating with a chemistry major.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Students interested in pursuing studies in chemical engineering should see the course outline in the Engineering Dual-Degree section of this catalog. The department chair should be consulted for assignment of a program advisor.

MINOR IN CHEMISTRY
22 semester hours
  • CHEM 115, 116
  • CHEM 320, 331, 332, 333, 334 (or 336) completed with grades of C or higher.


Prerequisite and co-requisite requirements are strictly enforced.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION

Students interested in a high school chemistry teaching endorsement should plan to complete a B.A. or B.S. in Chemistry. The degree program is developed through the chemistry department in conjunction with the Department of Education. Go to the Department of Education section of this catalog for further information.


COURSE OFFERINGS BY SEMESTER/TERM

Fall Semester: 104, 115, 331, 333, 341, 343, 403, 499A
Spring Semester:
105, 116, 320, 332, 334, 336, 343, 344, 405, 410, 420, 499B
Alternate Years: 440, 450, 456

Chemistry (CHEM) Undergraduate-Level Courses

CHEM 104: Environmental Chemistry - NS, SM

Basic principles of chemistry and reactions, with applications to human activities and the natural environment. Includes laboratory. No prerequisites; students without high school chemistry are encouraged to take CHEM 104 before taking CHEM 105 or CHEM 115. Also suitable for environmental studies, general science teachers, B.A. in geosciences, and general university core requirements. (4)

CHEM 105: Chemistry of Life - NS, SM

Basic organic and biochemistry applied to chemical processes in human systems; suitable for liberal arts students, nursing students, physical education majors, and prospective teachers. Students who have not completed high school chemistry recently should take CHEM 104 before taking CHEM 105. (4)

CHEM 115: General Chemistry I - NS, SM

Topics explored include the structure of matter, nomenclature, atomic and molecular theory, periodic relationships, states of matter, quantitative relationships, and thermochemistry. The course includes laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry. Co-requisite: MATH 140 or math placement in MATH 151 or higher. (4)

CHEM 116: General Chemistry II - NS, SM

Introduces students to chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry thermodynamics, electrochemistry, chemistry of the elements, and coordination compounds. The course includes laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: MATH 140 or higher and CHEM 115. (4)

CHEM 287: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 288: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 289: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 291: Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

CHEM 320: Analytical Chemistry

Chemical methods of quantitative analysis, including volumetric, gravimetric, and selected instrumental methods. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 116; MATH 140. (4)

CHEM 331: Organic Chemistry I

An introduction to structure, reactivity, and general properties of organic molecules. Prequisite: CHEM 116. Co-requisite: CHEM 333. (4)

CHEM 332: Organic Chemistry II

Chemistry of aromatic compounds, carbonyl-containing functional groups, amines, phenols, and an introduction to biologically important molecules. Prerequisites: CHEM 331 and 333. Co-requisite: CHEM 334 or 336. (4)

CHEM 333: Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

Reactions and methods of synthesis, separation and analysis of organic compounds. Microscale techniques. Practical investigation of reactions and classes of compounds discussed in CHEM 331. Co-requisite: CHEM 331. (1)

CHEM 334: Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

Synthesis of organic compounds, including instrumental and spectroscopic analyses. Practical investigation of reactions and classes of compounds discussed in CHEM 332. Prerequisite: CHEM 333. Co-requisite: CHEM 332. (1)

CHEM 336: Organic Special Projects Laboratory

Individual projects emphasizing current professional-level methods of synthesis and property determination of organic compounds. This course is an alternative to CHEM 334 and typically requires somewhat more time commitment. Students who wish to prepare for careers in chemistry or related areas should apply for departmental approval of their admission to this course. Co-requisite: CHEM 332. (1)

CHEM 341: Physical Chemistry

A study of the relationship between the energy content of systems, work, and the physical and chemical properties of matter. Classical and statistical thermodynamics, thermochemistry, solution properties, phase equilibria, and chemical kinetics. Prerequisites: CHEM 116, MATH 152, PHYS 154. (4)

CHEM 342: Physical Chemistry - NS, SM

A study of the physical properties of atoms, molecules and ions, and their correlation with structure. Classical and modern quantum mechanics, bonding theory, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHEM 116, MATH 152, PHYS 154. (4)

CHEM 343: Physical Chemistry Laboratory - NS, SM

Experiments in kinetics and thermodynamics. Attention given to data handling, error analysis, instrumentation, computational analysis, and correlation with theory. Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 341. (1)

CHEM 344: Physical Chemistry Laboratory

Experiments in molecular structure and spectroscopy. Attention given to data handling, error analysis, instrumentation, computational analysis, and correlation with theory. Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 342. (1)

CHEM 387: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 388: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 389: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 403: Biochemistry I

An overview of the structures, function, and regulation of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, and an introduction to metabolic and regulatory cellular processes. Majors are encouraged to take both CHEM 403 and 405 for a comprehensive exposure to biochemical theory and techniques. Prerequisites: CHEM 332 and 334 (or 336) (4)

CHEM 405: Biochemistry II

A continuation of CHEM 403 that provides further insight into cellular metabolism and regulation, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms of catalysis, protein synthesis, nucleic acid chemistry, and biotechnology. Concepts introduced in Physical Chemistry and Biochemistry I will be applied to this course. Laboratory designed to stimulate creativity and problem-solving abilities through the use of modern biochemical techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 403. (3)

CHEM 410: Introduction to Research

An introduction to laboratory research techniques, use of the chemical literature, including computerized literature searching, research proposal and report writing. Students develop an independent chemical research problem chosen in consultation with a member of the chemistry faculty. Students attend seminars as part of the course requirement. (2)

CHEM 420: Instrumental Analysis

Theory and practice of instrumental methods along with basic electronics. Special emphasis placed on electronics, spectrophotometric, chromatographic, and mass spectrometric methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 320; 341 and/or CHEM 342; 343. (4)

CHEM 440: Advanced Organic Chemistry

Students will develop a repertoire of synthetic methodology and a general understanding of a variety of organic reaction mechanisms. Synthetic organic strategies and design, the analysis of classic and recent total syntheses from the literature, and advanced applications of instrumentation in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 332. (2)

CHEM 450: Inorganic Chemistry

Techniques of structural determination (IR, UV, VIS, NMR, X-ray, EPR), bonding principles, nonmetal compounds, coordination chemistry, organometallics, donor/acceptor concepts, reaction pathways and biochemical applications are covered. Laboratory: Synthesis and characterization of non-metal, coordination and organometallic compounds. Prerequisites: CHEM 332, 341; Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 342. (3)

CHEM 456: Polymers and Biopolymers

A course presenting the fundamentals of polymer synthesis, solution thermodynamic properties, molecular characterization, molecular weight distribution, and solution kinetics. Free radical, condensation, ionic, and biopolymer systems, with emphasis on applications. The one-credit laboratory examining polymer synthesis through experiments is optional. Prerequisite: CHEM 341; Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 342. (3)

CHEM 487: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 488: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 489: Special Topics in Chemistry

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

CHEM 491: Independent Studies

Library and/or laboratory study of topics not included in regularly offered courses. Proposed project must be approved by department chair and supervisory responsibility accepted by an instructor. May be taken more than once. A specific title for the project may be appended to the general title of Independent Studies for CHEM 491. (1 to 4)

CHEM 495: Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

CHEM 497: Research

Experimental or theoretical investigation open to upper-division students with consent of department chair. May be taken more than once. Generally consists of a research project developed in consultation with a chemistry faculty member. A specific title for the project may be appended to the general title of Research for CHEM 497. (1 to 4)

CHEM 499A: Capstone Seminar I - SR

Students are trained in the practice of scientific writing and presentation by initiation of a project developed through independent library or laboratory research under the mentorship of a faculty advisor. Effective oral presentation skills are critically evaluated in seminars by practicing scientists and fellow students. Participation by all senior chemistry majors is required. With CHEM 499B, meets the senior seminar/project requirement. (1)

CHEM 499B: Capstone Seminar II - SR

Continuation of CHEM 499A with emphasis on completion of an independent library or laboratory research project with a faculty advisor. This includes presentation of their research in a department seminar and submission of the final capstone paper. Participation by all senior chemistry majors is required. With CHEM 499A meets the senior seminar/project requirements. (1)