Global Studies

The Global Studies Program aims to encourage and enable students to achieve global literacy defined as a multidisciplinary approach to contending perspectives on global problems, their historical origins, and their possible solutions. To this end, the Global Studies program offers courses and experiences designed to equip students with the factual knowledge and analytical skills necessary to comprehend, and engage with, foundational questions of global analysis (e.g., the commonalities and variations between human cultures), identifiable global themes (e.g., war and peace, economic development, globalization and trade, environmental sustainability), and the specifics of particular contemporary global problems (e.g., regional conflicts, weapons proliferation, environmental degradation, movement for political integration and autonomy, the AIDS crisis).

Course of Study

Students electing the Global Studies major are required to declare a minor or major in another discipline.  No more than two courses (8 semester hours) can be taken in any one discipline to fulfill the requirements for the issue concentration for the Global Studies major. In addition, students may not apply more than two courses (8 semester hours) from all other major or minors.


Bachelor of Arts Degree

Major in Global Studies

32 semester hours

    • Global Studies Core
      16 semester hours
        • GLST/ANTH/HIST 210: Global Perspectives: The World in Change (4)
        • Select two courses from the following:
          • ANTH 102: Intro to Human Cultural Diversity (4)
          • ECON 111: Principles of Microeconomics: Global and Environmental (4)
          • HIST 215: Modern World History (4)
        • GLST 499: Capstone: Research Seminar (4)
    • Issue Area Concentrations
      16 semester hours

Four courses must be taken from one of the three concentrations outlined below. At least three of the four courses counted toward a concentration must be at the 300 level or higher.

    • Language

Students must demonstrate proficiency in a language relevant to their coursework and at a level consistent with Option 1 of the College of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. This may be accomplished through a proficiency examination or through the equivalent of 16 semester hours of coursework.

Off-Campus Study Component

Majors are required to participate in an off-campus study program. While off campus, students must earn eight semester hours of credit related to the global studies core or the student’s global studies concentration. At least four credits must be related directly to the student’s global studies concentration. For example, this study away requirement could be met by taking two appropriate J-Term courses, or by eight semester hours of appropriate coursework taken during a semester away. Language study coursework does not necessarily count for this requirement; coursework must deal with the contemporary world and its issues. Obtaining pre-approval for credit is encouraged. Local internships related to an area concentration and involving a cross-cultural setting may be allowed. The Global Studies chair must approve exceptions.

Senior Research Project

The senior project is a general university requirement in all programs and majors. Students satisfy this requirement by completing a research project or paper in GLST 499.


Concentrations

    • Development and Social Justice

Today over half of the world lives in extreme poverty, mostly in the developing world. Raising the quality of life for this portion of humanity is a primary goal of economic, political, and social development. However, there are many obstacles to development ranging from problems with imperialism and post-colonialism, to failed economic strategies and corruption. Imbalances in the relationship between developed and developing countries may hinder the development attempts of poor countries. Studying these issues leads to understanding global inequality and the causes of, and possible solutions to, the chronic global problem of poverty.

        • Required of all students in this concentration:
          • GLST 357: Global Development (4)
        • Other Offerings
          • ECON 333: Economic Development: Comparative Third World Strategies (4)
          • ENGL 216: Topics in Literature: Emphasis on Cross-Cultural Perspectives (4)
          • ENGL 233: Post-Colonial Literature (4)
          • HISP 301: Hispanic Voices for Social Change (when approved by the GLST chair) (4)
          • HISP 322: Latin American Culture and Civilization (4)
          • HIST 335: History of the Caribbean (4)
          • HIST 340: Modern Japan (4)
          • RELI 247: Christian Theology (When topic is: “Global Christian Theologies”) (4)
          • RELI 357: Major Religious Thinkers, Texts, and Genres (When topic is: “Theologies of Liberation”) (4)
          • SCAN 363: Culture, Gender, and the Wild (4)
          • SOCW 325: Social, Educational and Health Services in Tobago

    • Transnational Interaction, Integration, and Diversity

A major feature of globalization is an increase in both the scale and frequency of the cross-border movement of peoples (as economic migrants, as refugees from conflicts or natural disasters, or as asylum-seekers) and ideas (the spread of ideologies, religions, and outlooks). This concentration comprises interdisciplinary perspectives on the political, economic, social, and cultural impacts of this increased mobility for the places of origin and destination, and for the ways ideas are formed and changed.

        • Required of all students in this concentration:
          • SCAN 322: Scandinavia and World Issues (4) or HISP 341: The Latino Experiences in the U.S. (4)
        • Other Offerings:
          • ANTH 330: Native North Americans (4)
          • ANTH 336: Peoples of Latin America (4)
          • ANTH 340: The Anthropology of Africa (4)
          • ANTH 342: Pacific Island Cultures (4)
          • ANTH 343: East Asian Cultures (4)
          • ECON 321: Labor Economics (4)
          • ENGL 216: Topics in Literature: Emphasis on Cross-Cultural Perspectives (4)
          • ENGL 343: Post-Colonial Literature and Theory (4)
          • FREN 301: Composition and Conversation (When approved by GLST chair) (4)
          • GERM 301: Composition and Conversation (When approved by GLST chair) (4)
          • GLST 383: Modern European Politics (4)
          • GLST 384: Scandinavian Government and Politics (4)
          • GLST 385: Canadian Government and Politics (4)
          • HISP 301: Hispanic Voices for Social Change (4)
          • HISP 321: Civilization & Culture of Spain (4)
          • HISP 322: Latin American Civilization & Culture (4)
          • HISP 341: The Latino Experiences in the U.S. (4)
          • HIST 310: Contemporary Japan: 1945 – Present (4)
          • HIST 322: History of the Caribbean (4)
          • HIST 337: The History of Mexico (4)
          • HIST 338: Modern China (4)
          • HIST 339: Revolutionary China (4)
          • HIST 344: The Andes in Latin American History (4)
          • NORW 301: Conversation and Composition (4)
          • RELI 247: Christian Theology (When topic is: “Global Christian Theologies”) (4)
          • RELI 390/393: Topics in Comparative Religions (4)
          • SCAN 322: Scandinavia and World Issues (4)
          • SCAN 363: Culture, Gender, and the Wild (4)

    • International Affairs

International Affairs have increasingly become understood through interdisciplinary explorations. Diplomacy and political relations require understanding not just of political relationships, but also of economic interactions. Conflict resolution at both domestic (such as in Rwanda) and international (such as between Israel and Palestine) levels requires diplomacy, but also deep cultural understandings. This concentration is designed to provide students with the foundations to build a comprehensive and nuanced understanding of international affairs.

        • Required of all students in this concentration:
          • GLST 331: International Relations (4)
        • Other Offerings
          • GLST 325: Global Political Thought (4)
          • GLST 357: Global Development (4)
          • GLST 431: Advanced International Relations (4)
          • ANTH 355: Anthropology and Media (4)
          • ANTH 376: Nation, State, and Citizen (4)
          • BUSA 337: International Finance and Risk Management (4)
          • BUSA 460: International Marketing (4)
          • COMA 304: Intercultural Communication (4)
          • COMA 340: Conflict and Communication (4)
          • ECON 331: International Trade and Commercial Policy (4)
          • ECON 333: Economic Development: Comparative Third World Strategies (4)
          • ECON 335: European Economic Integration (4)
          • SCAN 322: Scandinavia and the World (4)

Minor

20 semester hours

        • GLST/ANTH/HIST 210: Global Perspectives – The World in Change (4)
        • Select one course from the following:
          • ANTH 102: Intro to Human Cultural Diversity (4)
          • ECON 111: Principles of Microeconomics: Global and Environmental (4)
            • HIST 215: Modern World History (4)
        • Three courses in one concentration, including the required course for that concentration, and at least two must be at the 300 level or higher.

Students must take one semester of 200-level college coursework in a foreign language or demonstrate equivalent proficiency.

Students must take at least 4 semester hours of study away course work related to the contemporary world and its issues. For example, one appropriate January Term (J-Term) course that would apply toward the student’s concentration.


Global Studies (GLST) - Undergraduate Courses

GLST 210 : Global Perspectives: The World in Change - C, SO

A survey of global issues: modernization and development; economic change and international trade; diminishing resources; war and resolution; peace and justice; and cultural diversity. May be cross-listed with ANTH 210 or HIST 210. (4)

GLST 287 : Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 288 : Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 289 : Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 291 : Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

GLST 301 : Tacoma: The Power of Place and Identity

Study of Tacoma as a place rich with multiple layers of overlapping and competing stories and identities, integrating investigations of histories of inhabitation, colonization and ongoing immigration, environmental dynamics and social patterns. (4)

GLST 325 : Global Political Thought

A survey of major political thinkers from ancient to modern times, with particular emphasis on non-Western twentieth-century contributors. Can count for a philosophy major or minor. (4)

GLST 331 : International Relations

A systematic analysis of the international system highlighting patterns in state interaction. Intensive writing course. (4)

GLST 357 : Global Development

This course examines the emergence of international development as an idea, its effects on the livelihoods of billions of people around the world, and seeks potentials for improving the practice of development. Drawing on literature from anthropology, political science, geography, and economics, we cover theories of progress, the concept of participation, global poverty and inequality, and individual charity. (4)

GLST 383 : Modern European Politics

A study of the origins and development of the European Union and an examination of the governmental systems and political cultures of key European states, including France, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom. (4)

GLST 384 : Scandinavian Government and Politics

This course examines the governmental structures and political processes of the Scandinavian countries. It does so in the context of the region's historical development, its political cultures and ideologies, the distinctive Scandinavian model of political economy and welfare, and the place of Scandinavia in the international system. (4)

GLST 385 : Canadian Government and Politics

The governmental system and political life of Canada, with special attention to the constitution, political parties, nationalism and separatism in Quebec, self-government of native peoples, and comparative study of Canadian and U.S. political cultures. Intensive writing course. (4)

GLST 387 : Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 388 : Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 389 : Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 431 : Advanced International Relations

Examines various theories of international conflict management, including in-depth analysis of historical examples. The development of international law and international governmental organizations are also considered. Prerequisite:GLST 331. (4)

GLST 487 : Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 488 : Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 489 : Special Topics in Global Studies

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

GLST 491 : Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

GLST 495 : Internship

A project, usually undertaken during a study-abroad experience and supervised by a PLU faculty member, that combines field experience, research, and writing on issues related to the student's issue concentration in Global Studies. Local internships that involve transnational issues and constituencies will also be considered. Prerequisite: prior consent of the chair of the global studies committee and of the supervising PLU faculty member. (1 to 12)

GLST 499 : Capstone: Research Seminar - SR

Required of all students majoring and minoring in Global Studies, this is a capstone seminar that culminates in the writing of an extensive research paper. Prerequisite: ANTH/GLST/HIST/ 210. (4)

Last Modified: July 31, 2015 at 7:10 pm