Department ofEnglish

Adela Ramos

Adela Ramos

Assistant Professor of English

253-535-7776 (office)

Profile

Professional
Emphases

Eighteenth-Century British Literature

Critical Animals Studies

Gender

Genre and The History of the Novel

World Literature and Immigration

Education
Degrees

Ph.D. in English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University, 2010

M.A. in English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University, 2004

B.A. in English Language and Literature, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), 2001

Diploma in Translation Studies, El Colegio de México, Mexico City, 1998-2000

Personal
Biography

Adela Ramos was born in Mexico City, where she received her B.A. in Modern Languages and Literatures from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) and a Diplome in Translation Studies from El Colegio de México. She received her PhD in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University (New York) with an emphasis on eighteenth-century British Literature.

Her teaching emphases include eighteenth-century British literature, critical animal studies, ecocriticism, gender and race, history of the novel, and literature and immigration. She teaches FYEP 101 and 190, 200-and-300-level courses and the Capstone Seminar for the Department of English.

Her book project, Species of Writing: Animals, Humans, and Literary Form in Eighteenth-Century Britain, traces how eighteenth-century British writers engaged the species concept and anthropomorphism to re-order relations among humans and animals, men and women, and racial others.  

Her translation of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's 'To a Young Ass' was published in Escarcha a medianoche (Arsenal). She just completed an article about Mary Wollstonecraft's animal metaphors in A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and is beginning work on an article that will explore the relationship between exotic pets and hospitality in Maria Edgeworth's novel, Belinda. She is also at work on a second project about killing and eating animals in eighteenth-century literature.