Education

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Bachelor of Arts in Education (B.A.E.) Degree

Major in Education

68-70 semester hours depending on specific program

The following information is for students entering the undergraduate degree program in Fall 2016. For candidates that entered the B.A.E. program prior to Fall 2016, please refer to earlier PLU catalogs.

Eligibility Requirements for Admission to B.A.E. Program

All individuals seeking to enter an undergraduate degree program must apply to the department. A completed application must be submitted to the department by March 1st for Fall Semester admission.

A completed application will include the following requirements:

  • Evidence of verbal and quantitative ability as illustrated by a passing score on each of the three sections of the Washington Educators Skills Test Basic (WEST-B) or equivalent SAT/ACT scores. Check www.west.nesinc.com to register (not required for Outreach Education majors).
  • Official transcripts of all college/university work (must be from a regionally accredited college/university; foreign transcripts must have a professional evaluation for regional university equivalency)
  • Junior standing (60 or more semester hours)
  • Cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.75
  • Psychology 101 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher
  • Writing 101 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher
  • MATH 123 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher must be taken prior to admission to the Elementary Education program in the Department of Education.
  • Two letters of recommendation: one academic/professional reference and one that speaks to the candidate’s work with young people
  • Essay of 500-750 words identifying and discussing three values that will guide your educational practice.
  • Interview
  • Application forms and procedures for admission to professional studies in education are available on the department’s website: www.plu.edu/education/
  • The admission criteria will be used to assess the student’s academic and professional readiness.

Continuation in a program of study in the department is subject to continuous assessment of student development and performance. Candidates are required to demonstrate the mastery of knowledge, skills, professionalism, attitudes, and dispositions required for effective practice. Records will be reviewed at the end of each semester to ensure candidates are meeting standards throughout the program.

Degree and Certification Requirements

  • All coursework is completed with a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or above.
  • All coursework designated by EDUC, SPED, or EPSY have been completed with a B- grade or better.
  • All additional courses related to and required for education programs and teacher certification have been completed with a grade of C or better. For elementary education candidates these include: MATH 123 or equivalent; MATH 124 or equivalent; life science; physical science; KINS 322 or equivalent; ARTD 340 or equivalent; and MUSI 341 or equivalent.

Note: Each endorsement requires passing the designated WEST-E or NES (and ACTFL if pursuing World Languages). Refer to the student handbook for testing timelines.The WEST-E or NES  (and ACTFL if necessary) must be taken and passed prior to student teaching.

Eligibility for Certification

Candidates become eligible for certification when they have met the requirements for a B.A.E. and passed the Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) required by the state of Washington and scored by Pearson. The B.A.E. requirements are separate from the teacher certification. Though a passing score is required for certification, the student is required to complete the edTPA in order to be eligible to earn the B.A.E.

Residency Teaching Certificate

Candidates who successfully complete a program of professional studies in the department, who meet all related academic requirements for a degree or a certificate, and who meet all state requirements will be recommended by the department for a Washington State residency teaching certificate. Additional state requirements include a minimum age of 18, good moral character and personal fitness as evidenced by completion of state Character and Fitness Supplement and Washington State Patrol/FBI background check via fingerprint clearance, assessment by means of passing scores on WEST-B, WEST-E or NES/ACTFL exams, and completion of state certification application and payment of state certification fee. Information regarding all state requirements and procedures for certification is available from the certification officer in the department. State requirements are subject to immediate change. Candidates should meet with department advisors each semester and the certification officer for updates in program or application requirements.

Note: The department will make every reasonable attempt to obtain and distribute the most current information regarding Washington State certification requirements, but cannot guarantee that state requirements will remain unchanged.


Elementary Certification and Endorsement Options

The basic undergraduate elementary education (K-8) program consists of a four-term program starting in the Fall Semester only. All students seeking elementary endorsement must complete a minimum of 20 semester hours in an emphasis area.www.plu.edu/education/endorsements/

Elementary Professional Education Sequence

MATH 123 must be taken prior to admission to the program MATH 124 is recommended to be taken prior to admission and must be completed before the end of Semester II. Candidates are strongly encouraged to complete KINS 322, a life science and a physical science prior to program entrance. These courses, plus MUSI 341, must be completed prior to program completion.

Candidates pursuing a residency teaching certificate and an elementary K-8 endorsement must also complete a second endorsement through the completion of additional coursework, passing the WEST-E or NES, passing the ACTFL (if pursuing a world language) and completing student teaching. All exams (WEST-E or NES, and if pursuing a world language the ACTFL) must be completed prior to student teaching. The number of endorsements that can be pursued in the B.A.E. certification is two, the only exception being the combination of elementary education/early childhood education/early childhood special education.


Elementary Education/Special Education Professional Education Sequence

70 semester hours

In this teacher certification program, candidates pursue an endorsement in special education (P-12) and elementary education (K-8) while earning a B.A.E. degree. Endorsements are awarded upon successful completion of coursework, Internship II (student teaching) experience and a passing edTPA score.

Students are encouraged to take the following courses prior to admission to the program:

  • MATH 123 or equivalent – required prior to admission
  • MATH 124 or equivalent – required by the end of Semester II
  • KINS 322 or equivalent
  • Life Science
  • Physical Science

These courses, plus MUSI 341, must be completed prior to program completion.

First Year: Semester I (Fall)
13 semester hours

  • EDUC 320: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
  • EDUC 330: Professional Practice I (0)
  • EDUC 331: Building Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 332: Communities, Schools, and Students (2)
  • EDUC 333: Instructional and Classroom Management Systems (4)
  • EDUC 334: Foundations of Educational Measurement (2)
  • SPED 335: Educational Assessment & Evaluation (2)

First Year: J-Term I
5 semester hours

  • SPED 450: Early Childhood Special Education (2)
  • SPED 454: Moderate and Low Incidence Disabilities (3)

First Year: Semester II (Spring)
17 semester hours

  • EDUC 370: Professional Practice II (0)
  • EDUC 371: Developing Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 372: Literacy, Language, and Assessment (4)
  • EDUC 373: Mathematics, Science, and Assessment (4)
  • EDUC 374: Management and Student Engagement (2)
  • EDUC 375: Technology Integration (2)
  • SPED 376: Instructional Methodologies for Inclusive Classrooms (3)

Second Year: Semester III (Fall)
13 semester hours

  • EDUC 402: Internship I (0)
  • EDUC 403: Building Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 404: The Integration of Literacy in Social Studies (3)
  • EDUC 405: Art Methods (2)
  • EDUC 407: Writing Across the Curriculum (2)
  • SPED 404: Collaboration, Team Building, and Supervision (2)
  • SPED 431: Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (2)

Second Year: J-Term II
5 semester hours

  • SPED 430: Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities (3)
  • SPED 442: Technology in Special Education (2)

Passing scores on the WEST-E or NES endorsement tests for elementary education and special education must be received before a student can start in Semester IV.

Second Year: Semester IV (Spring)
17 semester hours

  • EDUC 450: Seminar – SR (2)
  • EDUC 455: Internship II (13)
  • EDUC 460: Professional Learning Communities (2)

Elementary Education/Early Childhood Education/Early Childhood Special Education Professional Education Sequence

70 semester hours

In this teacher certification program, candidates pursue an endorsement in early childhood education/early childhood special education (P-3) and elementary education (K-8) while earning a B.A.E. degree. Endorsements are awarded upon successful completion of coursework, Internship II (student teaching) experience and a passing edTPA score.

Entering candidates who have an Early Childhood Education AA-DTA degree or equivalent from an accredited institution could be awarded up to 6 semester hours of the ECE/ECSE endorsement program based on transcript review and earning a 3.00 grade point average in early childhood coursework taken during the candidate’s first term at PLU.

Students are encouraged to take the following courses prior to admission to the program:

  • MATH 123 or equivalent – required prior to admission
  • MATH 124 or equivalent – required by the end of Semester II
  • KINS 322 or equivalent
  • Life Science
  • Physical Science

These courses, plus MUSI 341, must be completed prior to program completion.

First Year: Semester I (Fall)
13 semester hours

  • EDUC 320: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
  • EDUC 330: Professional Practice I (0)
  • EDUC 331: Building Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 332: Communities, Schools, and Students (2)
  • EDUC 333: Instructional and Classroom Management Systems (4)
  • EDUC 334: Foundations of Educational Measurement (2)
  • SPED 335: Educational Assessment & Evaluation (2)

First Year: J-Term I
5 semester hours

  • SPED 450: Early Childhood Special Education (2)
  • EDUC 417: Early Childhood Curriculum, Instructional Strategies, and Progress Monitoring (3)

First Year: Semester II (Spring)
17 semester hours

  • EDUC 370: Professional Practice II (0)
  • EDUC 371: Developing Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 372: Literacy, Language, and Assessment (4)
  • EDUC 373: Mathematics, Science, and Assessment (4)
  • EDUC 374: Management and Student Engagement (2)
  • EDUC 375: Technology Integration (2)
  • SPED 376: Instructional Methodologies for Inclusive Classrooms (3)

Second Year: Semester III (Fall)
13 semester hours

  • EDUC 402: Internship I (0)
  • EDUC 403: Building Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 404: The Integration of Literacy in Social Studies (3)
  • EDUC 405: Art Methods (2)
  • EDUC 407: Writing Across the Curriculum (2)
  • SPED 404: Collaboration, Team Building, and Supervision (2)
  • SPED 431: Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (2)

Second Year: J-Term II
5 semester hours

  • EDUC 416: Assessment in Early Childhood (2)
  • EDUC 419: Child Guidance and Positive Behavior Support (3)

Passing scores on the WEST-E or NES endorsement tests for elementary education, early childhood education and early childhood special education must be received before a student can start in Semester IV. One of these tests may be taken for the first time before Semester III.

Second Year: Semester IV (Spring)
17 semester hours

  • EDUC 450: Seminar – SR (2)
  • EDUC 455: Internship II (13)
  • EDUC 460: Professional Learning Communities (2)

Elementary Education/Reading Professional Education Sequence

68 semester hours

In this teacher certification program, candidates pursue an endorsement in reading and elementary education (K-8) while earning a B.A.E., degree. Endorsements are awarded upon successful completion of coursework, Internship II (student teaching) experience and a passing edTPA score.

Students are encouraged to take the following courses prior to admission to the program:

  • MATH 123 or equivalent – required prior to admission
  • MATH 124 or equivalent – required by the end of Semester II
  • KINS 322 or equivalent
  • Life Science
  • Physical Science

These courses, plus MUSI 341, must be completed prior to program completion.

First Year: Semester I (Fall)
13 semester hours

  • EDUC 320: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
  • EDUC 330: Professional Practice I (0)
  • EDUC 331: Building Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 332: Communities, Schools, and Students (2)
  • EDUC 333: Instructional and Classroom Management Systems (4)
  • EDUC 334: Foundations of Educational Measurement (2)
  • SPED 335: Educational Assessment & Evaluation (2)

First Year: J-Term I
4 semester hours

  • EDUC 429: Children and Adolescent Literature in the K-8 Curriculum (2)
  • EDUC 490: Acquisition and Development of Language (2)

First Year: Semester II (Spring)
17 semester hours

  • EDUC 370: Professional Practice II (0)
  • EDUC 371: Developing Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 372: Literacy, Language, and Assessment (4)
  • EDUC 373: Mathematics, Science, and Assessment (4)
  • EDUC 374: Management and Student Engagement (2)
  • EDUC 375: Technology Integration (2)
  • SPED 377: Instructional Methodologies for Inclusive Classrooms (3)

Second Year: Semester III (Fall)
13 semester hours

  • EDUC 402: Internship I (0)
  • EDUC 403: Building Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 404: The Integration of Literacy in Social Studies (3)
  • EDUC 405: Art Methods (2)
  • EDUC 407: Writing Across the Curriculum (2)
  • EDUC 423: Linguistics for Language Literacy (2)
  • SPED 404: Collaboration, Team Building, and Supervision (2)

Second Year; J-Term II
4 semester hours

  • EDUC 428: Assessments in Literacy (2)
  • EDUC 438: Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction (K-8) (2)

Passing scores on the WEST-E or NES endorsement test for elementary education and reading must be presented before a student can enroll in Semester IV.

Second Year: Semester IV (Spring)
17 semester hours

  • EDUC 450: Seminar – SR (2)
  • EDUC 455: Internship II (13)
  • EDUC 460: Professional Learning Communities (2)

Elementary Education/English Language Learner (ELL) Professional Education Sequence

68 semester hours

In this teacher certification program, candidates pursue an endorsement in ELL and elementary education (K-8) while earning a B.A.E. degree. Endorsements are awarded upon successful completion of coursework, Internship II (student teaching) experience and a passing edTPA score. Students are encouraged to take the following courses prior to admission to the program:

  • MATH 123 or equivalent – required prior to admission
  • MATH 124 or equivalent – required by the end of Semester II
  • KINS 322 or equivalent
  • Life Science
  • Physical Science

These courses, plus MUSI 341, must be completed prior to program completion.

First Year: Semester I (Fall)
13 semester hours

  • EDUC 320: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
  • EDUC 330: Professional Practice I (0)
  • EDUC 331: Building Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 322: Communities, Schools, and Students (2)
  • EDUC 333: Instructional and Classroom Management Systems (4)
  • EDUC 334: Foundations of Educational Measurement (2)
  • SPED 335: Educational Assessment & Evaluation (2)

First Year: J-Term I
2 semester hours

  • EDUC 490: Acquisition and Development of Language (2)

First Year: Semester II (Spring)
17 semester hours

  • EDUC 370: Professional Practice II (0)
  • EDUC 371: Developing Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 372: Literacy, Language, and Assessment (4)
  • EDUC 373: Mathematics, Science, and Assessment (4)
  • EDUC 374: Management and Student Engagement (2)
  • EDUC 375: Technology Integration (2)
  • SPED 377: Instructional Methodologies for Inclusive Classrooms (3)

First Year: Summer
4 semester hours

  • EDUC 445: Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and English as a Second Language (4)

Second Year: Semester III (Fall)
13 semester hours

  • EDUC 402: Internship I (0)
  • EDUC 403: Building Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 404: The Integration of Literacy in Social Studies (3)
  • EDUC 405: Art Methods (2)
  • EDUC 407: Writing Across the Curriculum (2)
  • EDUC 423: Linguistics for Language Literacy (2)
  • SPED 404: Collaboration, Team Building, and Supervision (2)

Second Year: J-Term II
2 semester hours

  • EDUC 438: Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction (K-8) (2)

Passing scores on the WEST-E or NES endorsement test for elementary education and ELL must be presented before a student can enroll in Semester IV.

Second Year: Semester IV (Spring)
17 semester hours

  • EDUC 450: Seminar – SR (2)
  • EDUC 455: Internship II (13)
  • EDUC 460: Professional Learning Communities (2)

Emphasis Areas

  • Health & Fitness

May only be pursued as an emphasis. A B.A.K. with certification and endorsement in health and fitness education can be pursued through the Department of Kinesiology.

  • Music

May only be pursued as an emphasis through the Department of Education. A B.M.E can be pursued through the Department of Music.


Secondary Certification and Endorsement Options

Program is currently in Hiatus. Applications are not being accepted at this time.

Please see the assistant director of admission and advising in the Department of Education. The department recommends majoring in your subject of interest and pursuing the M.A.E.-Certification. For more information on graduate programs, please see the graduate programs section of the catalog.

Bachelor of Arts in Education

Major in Outreach Education

55 semester hours

The outreach education major is designed to prepare candidates for non-school type of educative jobs. Candidates in outreach education must complete the same admission requirements as all education majors, minus WEST-B scores. Candidates in this program are prepared to be educational leaders in the community, but do not fulfill requirements for residency certification. The course of study includes content-related information for specific area of interest (a minimum of 20 semester hours in their area of interest. Courses must be approved by the program coordinator.

  1. educational theory and methods classes; and
  2. two new courses specifically designed for students who plan to use their education background for educational work in non-school community institutions, such as: museums, environmental education centers, performing arts organizations, businesses, etc.

This education background along with the student’s area of academic emphasis will be taken into consideration for the job-shadow and internship components of this program.

Required Content Area and Emphasis

Students must complete must complete 20 semester hours in the content area most closely related to their area of outreach education interest. For example, if a student is interested in working in a historical museum, the student would complete 20 semester hours in history; if a student is interested in working in an art museum, the 20 semester hours would be in art. Candidates must consult with an advisor to determine their content area.

Before Education Sequence

  • EDUC 195: Survey of Education and Community Involvement (4) or EDUC 205: Multicultural Perspectives in the Classroom (4)
  • Note: EDUC 195 is not offered in 2016-17

First Year: Semester I ( Fall)
13 semester hours

  • EDUC 320: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
  • EDUC 330: Professional Practice (0)
    • Outreach education majors will work in schools during this field experience. Experience in the classroom is an important component for understanding education in general, connecting with the schools, developing presentation skills (how to read your audience) and to develop management skills when working with a group of diverse learners and behaviors.
  • EDUC 331: Building Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 332: Communities, Schools, and Students  (2)
  • EDUC 333: Instructional and Classroom Management Systems (4)
  • EDUC 334: Foundations of Educational Measurement (2)
  • SPED 335: Educational Assessment & Evaluation (2)

First Year: Semester II (Spring)
17 semester hours

  • EDUC 370: Professional Practice
    • Outreach education majors will work in schools during this field experience. Experience in the classroom is an important component for understanding education in general, connecting with the schools, developing presentation skills (how to read your audience) and to develop management skills when working with a group of diverse learners and behaviors.
  • EDUC 371: Developing Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 372: Literacy, Language, and Assessment (4)
  • EDUC 373: Mathematics, Science, and Assessment (4)
  • EDUC 374: Management and Student Engagement (2)
  • EDUC 375: Technology Integration (2)
  • SPED 377: Instructional Methodologies for Inclusive Classrooms (3)

Second  Year: Semester III (Fall)
13 semester hours

  • EDUC 360: Tools for Community Involvement (4)
  • EDUC 402: Internship I (0)
    • Job shadowing experience with a number of different outreach education programs.
  • EDUC 403: Building Professional Learning Communities (2)
  • EDUC 404: The Integration of Literacy in Social Studies (3)
  • EDUC 407: Writing Across the Curriculum (2)
  • SPED 404: Collaboration, Team Building, and Supervision (2)

Second Year: Semester IV (Spring)
12 semester hours

  • EDUC 495: Internship (placement in an outreach education program) (10 hrs)
  • EDUC 450: Seminar – SR (2)

Preparation for Teaching in Private and/or Christian School

Candidates interested in teaching in private or Christian schools will begin their professional preparation by completing all requirements for the Washington State Residency Certificate. In addition, they are required to take the religion minor (Teacher Education option) noted under the Department of Religion course offerings, plus add a private school practicum to their program.

Early Advising

As early as possible during their study at PLU, prospective department majors should meet with the advising coordinator to discuss the various options and to determine their program of study.


Certification Options for Persons Who Hold a Baccalaureate Degree From a Regionally-Accredited Institution

Persons who hold a baccalaureate degree (or higher) from a regionally-accredited institution and who wish to pursue a teaching certificate should make an appointment with the assistant director of admissions and advising for a planning session. Options for these individuals can be found in the Graduate and Post-Baccalaureate section of this catalog.

To view graduate-level work in the School of Education and Kinesiology, go to the Graduate and Post-Baccalaureate section of this catalog or www.plu.edu/education/ppd/


Professional Teaching Certificate

Teachers must earn their Professional Certificate during their first few years of teaching. This Certificate is earned via a passing score on the ProTeach assessment. Check with OSPI for specific timelines and requirements. Within a five-year period, after completing the probationary period for teaching in one district, teachers in Washington must earn a Professional Certificate (WAC 18-79A-145), PLU offers a preparation program to assist teachers in preparation and submission of the ProTeach assessment. More information is available on the School of Education and Kinesiology website.

Qualifications for the Professional Certificate

To qualify for a Professional Certificate, an individual must have completed provisional status as a teacher in a public school pursuant to RCW 28A.405.220 or the equivalent in a state board of education approved private school.

Additional Endorsement Options for Educators
www.plu.edu/education/programs/add-on-endorsement/


Education (EDUC) - Undergraduate Courses

EDUC 190 : FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

EDUC 195 : Survey of Education and Community Involvement

The class will review the various educational opportunities in community organizations including education provided by: museums; environmental interpretation groups; music organizations; theatres; film festivals; and science centers. The class will be taught using activities, lecture, guest speakers, reading and research, field experiences along with group and individual assignments and projects. (4)

EDUC 205 : Multicultural Perspectives in the Classroom - A

Examination of issues of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, etc. as they relate to educational practices. (4)

EDUC 287 : Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 288 : Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 289 : Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 291 : Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

EDUC 320 : Issues in Child Abuse and Neglect

Issues of child abuse, neglect, harassment, and violence. Includes identification and reporting procedures, and the legal and professional responsibilities of all mandated reporters. (1)

EDUC 330 : Professional Practice I

Teacher candidates will be required to complete a minimum of 45 hours of fieldwork in a local school. Co-registration in EDUC 331. (0)

EDUC 331 : Building Professional Learning Communities

Seminar groups to provide a critical inquiry bridge between university-based coursework and P-12 fieldwork through the department's/unit's core values of care, competence, difference, service, and leadership. Co-registration in EDUC 330. (2)

EDUC 332 : Communities, Schools, and Students

Explores the purposes of P-12 education, how schools intersect with local communities, and the range of differences within learners. (2)

EDUC 333 : Instructional and Classroom Management Systems

Introduces commonly used instructional and management models and how developmental, behavioral, motivational, and learning principles inform a classroom environment. (4)

EDUC 334 : Foundations of Educational Measurement

Surveys the basic principles of assessment and measurement within education, including technical considerations and terminology. (2)

EDUC 340 : Elementary Art Education

A study of creative growth and development; art as studio projects; history and therapy in the classroom. (2)

EDUC 360 : Tools for Community Involvement

Students preparing for outreach education in museums, environmental interpretive centers, outreach education, and other community involvement settings will explore needed tools including: administration, leadership, connecting and interpreting with experts, exhibit design, curriculum, funding, recruiting and training volunteers, and other skills used to bridge community educational with schools and other venues. (4)

EDUC 370 : Professional Practice II

Teacher candidates will be required to complete a minimum of 90 hours of fieldwork in a local school. Required to coregister in EDUC 371. (0)

EDUC 371 : Developing Professional Learning Communities

Seminar groups to provide a critical inquiry bridge between university-based coursework and P-12 fieldwork through the unit's core values of care, competence, difference, service, and leadership. Co-registration in EDUC 370 required. (2)

EDUC 372 : Literacy, Language, and Assessment

Develops literacy, language, and ELL teaching strategies that can be incorporated into P-8 instructional models and assessments with applications to the development of lesson sequences. (4)

EDUC 373 : Mathematics, Science, and Assessment

Develops mathematics and science teaching strategies that can be incorporated into P-8 instructional models and assessments with applications to the development of lesson sequences. (4)

EDUC 374 : Management and Student Engagement

Develops management strategies for student engagement and increasing academic achievement (2)

EDUC 375 : Technology Integration

The integration of technology tools for the classroom. (2)

EDUC 385 : Comparative Education - C

Comparison and investigation of materials and cultural systems of education throughout the world. Emphasis on applying knowledge for greater understanding of diverse populations in the K-12 educational system. (4)

EDUC 387 : Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 388 : Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 389 : Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 391 : Foundations of Learning

Investigation into theories of learning and development and into historical and current practices, values, and beliefs that influence efforts to shape learning in educational settings. Topics include: self as learner, theories of learning, others as learners, exceptionalities, technology, values literacy, and factors influencing learning and literacy. Limited to music education majors. Prerequisite: admission to the School of Education and Kinesiology and completion of MUSI 340. (3)

EDUC 402 : Internship I

Teacher candidates will be required to complete a minimum of 90 hours of fieldwork in a local school. Co-registration with EDUC 404 required. (0)

EDUC 403 : Building Professional Learning Communities

Seminar groups to provide a critical inquiry bridge between university-based coursework and P-8 fieldwork through the unit's core values of care, competence, difference, service, and leadership. (2)

EDUC 404 : The Integration of Literacy in Social Studies

Integration of literacy for the teaching of social studies strategies that can be incorporated into P-8 instructional models and assessments with applications to the development of lesson sequences. Co-registration in EDUC 402 required. (3)

EDUC 405 : Art Methods

Methods and procedures in teaching elementary school art as well as infusing the arts in the curriculum. (2)

EDUC 407 : Writing Across the Curriculum

Develops strategies for the teaching of writing in all content areas in the P-8 curriculum. (2)

EDUC 414 : Foundations in Early Childhood Education

This course introduces the concepts of how children ages birth through grade three grow, develop and learn; the role of the family in the education of young children; and the importance of providing developmentally age and culturally appropriate learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, emotional and physical development of all young children. The course covers the historical context and rationale for providing educational programs to this age group and includes the laws and policies that currently affect delivery of services. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed course: SPED 414. (4)

EDUC 416 : Assessment in Early Childhood

In this course, students will learn the many purposes of assessment and become familiar with some of the assessment strategies and tools used most frequently for each purpose. (2)

EDUC 417 : Early Childhood Curriculum, Instructional Strategies, and Progress Monitoring

Students will learn the knowledge and skills needed to design classroom environments, develop and use curricula, deliver instruction, and make modifications based on student performance in the areas of art, music, science, math, language, literature, physical development, and critical thinking. Technology will be integrated throughout the course. (3)

EDUC 419 : Child Guidance and Positive Behavior Support

This course is designed to introduce students to theories and skills needed to promote the development of self-regulation, emotional, and social skills in young children and to effectively manage disruptive behaviors in early childhood classroom settings. The course includes strategies for understanding the reasons for challenging behavior, observing and documenting specific behaviors, designing and delivering developmentally appropriate intervention, and advocating for children. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed course: SPED 419. (3)

EDUC 423 : Linguistics for Language Literacy

Prepares pre-service teachers to understand the structure of language, language acquisition, and language learning to inform and facilitate research-based instructional practices. (2)

EDUC 428 : Assessments in Literacy

Understanding of a wide variety of strategies and tools for assessing and facilitating students' development in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. (2)

EDUC 429 : Children and Adolescent Literature in the K-8 Curriculum

Investigates genres of contemporary children's and adolescent literature and how to develop a personal repertoire of reading material for classroom use. Also examines strategies for teaching writing in K-8 classroom. (2)

EDUC 431 : Children's Writing

Current theory and practice in the teaching and learning of writing in K-12 classrooms. Cross-listed with EDUC 530. (2)

EDUC 434 : Student Teaching - Elementary (Dual)

Designed for persons who do dual student teaching. Ten weeks of teaching in classrooms of local public schools under the direct supervision of Department of Education faculty and classroom teachers. Prerequisite: successful completion of education courses Terms I-III. Concurrent with EDUC 450. (6)

EDUC 438 : Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction (K-8)

The use of language as a tool for learning across the curriculum, and the roles of language in all kinds of teaching and learning in K-8 classrooms. Strategies for reading/writing in content areas, thematic teaching, topic study, and integrating curriculum. Cross-listed with EDUC 538. (2)

EDUC 444 : English in Secondary School

Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning, curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. (4)

EDUC 445 : Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and English as a Second Language

Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning, curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. Required for foreign language endorsement. (4)

EDUC 446 : Mathematics in the Secondary School

Methods and materials in secondary school math teaching. Basic mathematical concepts; principles of number operation, relation, proof, and problem solving in the context of arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed with MATH 446. Prerequisite: EDUC 205 and MATH 253 or 331. (4)

EDUC 447 : Science in Secondary School

Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning, curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. (4)

EDUC 448 : Social Studies in the Secondary School

Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning, curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. (4)

EDUC 450 : Seminar - SR

A seminar for all education students focusing development of professionalism and competence in inquiry and reflective practice. Co-registration with EDUC 455 required. (2)

EDUC 455 : Internship II

Teacher candidates will be required to complete a minimum of 450 hours of student teaching experience in local public schools under the supervision of PLU-assigned supervisors and classroom teachers. Co-registration with EDUC 450 required. (10 or 13)

EDUC 458 : Student Teaching in Early Childhood Education

Teaching in early childhood settings serving children, ages birth to eight, with and without disabilities. Nine weeks. Candidates getting both the ECE/ECSE and special education endorsements will spend part of this time in a special education setting. Concurrent enrollment with EDUC 434 and 450. Cross-listed course: SPED 458. (3)

EDUC 460 : Professional Learning Communities

Seminar groups to provide a critical inquiry bridge between university-based coursework and P-8 fieldwork through the department's/unit's core values of care, competence, difference, service, and leadership. (2)

EDUC 468 : Student Teaching - Secondary

Teaching in public schools under the direction of classroom and university teachers. Prerequisites: Formal application; senior standing; cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher. Concurrent with EDUC 450. (10)

EDUC 487 : Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 488 : ST: Higher Education Leadership

Explores the foundations of leadership. Focus is on leadership in higher education. Restricted to PLU administrations and faculty. (1 to 4)

EDUC 489 : Special Topics in Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

EDUC 490 : Acquisition and Development of Language

Investigation of how young children acquire their first language and what they know as a result of this learning. Cross-listed with EDUC 510. (2)

EDUC 491 : Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

EDUC 495 : Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

EDUC 497 : Special Project

Individual study and research on education problems or additional laboratory experience in public school classrooms. Prerequisite: consent of the dean. (1 to 4)


Educational Psychology (EPSY) - Undergraduate Courses

EPSY 361 : Psychology for Teaching

Principles and research in human development and learning, especially related to teaching and to the psychological growth, relationships, and adjustment of individuals. For music education majors only. Admission to the School of Education and Kinesiology and completion of MUSI 340. (3)

EPSY 368 : Educational Psychology

Principles and research in human learning and their implications for curriculum and instruction. For secondary students who are not seeking certification in physical education or special education. Taken concurrently with EDUC 424. (4)


Special Education (SPED) - Undergraduate Courses

SPED 190 : FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

SPED 195 : Individuals with Disabilities - A

An introductory course focusing upon persons with disabilities. Overview of legal issues, characteristics, and current issues. Fulfills alternative assessment requirement. (4)

SPED 287 : Special Topics in Special Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SPED 288 : Special Topics in Special Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SPED 289 : Special Topics in Special Education

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SPED 315 : Assessment and Evaluation in Special Education

This course covers critical content in the area of assessment and evaluation of special needs populations. Types of assessments, issues of technical adequacy, and special education law are all covered. (2)

SPED 335 : Educational Assessment and Evaluation

Develops a knowledge of commonly used assessment instruments in P-12 schools and how data is used to drive instruction and management. (2)

SPED 376 : Instructional Methodologies for Inclusive Classrooms

Provides accommodations and remediation strategies connected to instructional models for the diverse learning needs of students. (3)

SPED 377 : Instructional Methodologies for Inclusive Classrooms

Provides accommodations and remediation strategies connected to instructional models for the diverse learning needs of students. (3)

SPED 399 : Practicum in Special Education

Experience with children and youth who have special needs. One hour credit given after successful completion of 45 clock hours and specific course competencies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (1 or 2)

SPED 404 : Collaboration, Team Building, and Supervision

Focuses on approaches and methodologies for establishing connections with communities, families, and various instructional staff members, including paraeducators. (2)

SPED 415 : Working with Families of Young Children

This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to engage families and to promote and support a family’s involvement in their child’s educational experiences. Students will learn effective ways to work with families and adults from a variety of cultural/linguistic/socio-economic backgrounds and families of children with special needs to develop appropriate individualized learning plans. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed course: EDUC 415. (3)

SPED 416 : Assessment in Early Childhood

In this course, students will learn the many purposes of assessment and become familiar with some of the assessment strategies and tools used most frequently for each purpose. Cross-listed course: EDUC 416. (2)

SPED 419 : Child Guidance and Positive Behavior Support

This course is designed to introduce students to theories and skills needed to promote the development of self-regulation, emotional, and social skills in young children and to effectively manage disruptive behaviors in early childhood classroom settings. The course includes strategies for understanding the reasons for challenging behavior, observing and documenting specific behaviors, designing and delivering developmentally appropriate intervention, and advocating for children. This course includes a field experience component. Cross-listed course: EDUC 419. (3)

SPED 423 : Methods of Teaching Students with Mild Disabilities

Focus on instructional strategies and service delivery models effective in teaching students with mild disabilities, included: individualized education programs, curriculum assessment, specially designed instruction and curriculum modification. (4)

SPED 430 : Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

In-depth exploration of issues related to the identification of and service delivery to students with emotional and behavioral disabilities. Emphasis on specialized management techniques needed to teach this population. A field experience will be required. (3)

SPED 431 : Issues in Autism Spectrum Disorders

This course will provide an overview of Autism Spectrum Disorder for educators as well as other related professionals who may work with or serve children and families with this diagnosis. This course will explore the characteristics of children, youth and adults with autism, evidence-based practices for prevention and intervention, problems and issues in the field, methods of positive behavior support and collaborating with families. Prerequisite: SPED 315 or permission of the instructor. (2)

SPED 442 : Technology in Special Education

Current issues and uses of computer technology for learners with special needs. Emphasis on computer assisted instruction, and assistive technology services and devices. (2)

SPED 450 : Early Childhood Special Education

Current issues related to young children with special needs. Focus on instructional methods, materials, curriculum, and assessment of this population. (2)

SPED 454 : Moderate and Low Incidence Disabilities

Exploration of the issues related to identification of and service delivery to this population. Specialized instruction, management techniques, and issues of transitioning from schools to community. A field experience component will be required. (3)

SPED 458 : Student Teaching in Early Childhood Special Education

Teaching in early childhood settings serving children, ages birth to eight, with and without disabilities. Nine weeks. Candidates getting both the ECE/ECSE and special education endorsements will spend part of this time in a special education setting. Concurrent enrollment with EDUC 434 and 450. Cross-listed course: EDUC 458. (3)

SPED 459 : Student Teaching in Special Education

Teaching in a K-8 special education setting; 9 weeks. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 434 and EDUC 450. (6)

SPED 460 : Special Education Student Teaching Seminar: Issues in Practice

A seminar for special education student teachers focusing on current issues in special education. Taken concurrently with student teaching Term IV Hub and EDUC 450. (1)

SPED 489 : Special Topics

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

SPED 491 : Independent Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with advanced study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as IS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

SPED 497 : Independent Study

Projects of varying length related to trends and issues in special education and approved by an appropriate faculty member and the dean. (1 or 2)

Last Modified: August 16, 2017 at 7:17 pm