Student Recruitment, Admissions and Progression

The Essential Qualifications for Participation in School of Nursing Degree Programs constitute important elements of academic performance criteria in the PLU School of Nursing degree programs. As such, the Essential Qualifications become part of the criteria by which students are evaluated for satisfactory performance and program progressions. The Essential Qualifications reflect a sample of the performance abilities and characteristics that are necessary to successfully complete the requirements of all nursing programs at PLU. All new and current PLU School of Nursing students are expected to embody these skills. Nursing students must attest to and demonstrate essential motor, sensory/observation, communication, cognitive, and behavioral/emotional skills necessary to be successful in the nursing profession.

The Essential Qualifications for Participation in School of Nursing Degree Programs are used to assist the student in determining whether or not they meet essential qualifications, or if accommodations or modifications might be necessary for successful completion of the program at the School of Nursing.

A student’s inability to fulfill program requirements, due in part or in whole to her/his ability to meet the Essential Qualifications, may affect the student’s grade in a nursing course or courses, program progression, continued program enrollment, and/or program completion/graduation. Such consequences do not imply discrimination and/or harassment on the part of the faculty member assigning such grades. Inability to meet classroom and clinical performance expectations, with or without accommodations, will result in progressions consequences.

Students are required to sign a statement of understanding, acknowledgement, and compliance

each semester of the nursing program. For further information, contact the School of Nursing at PLU and the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission, P. O. Box 47864, Olympia, Washington 98504-7864.

Essential Qualifications

The Essential Qualifications for Participation in School of Nursing Degree Programs (below) constitute important elements of academic performance criteria in the PLU School of Nursing degree programs. As such, the Essential Qualifications become part of the criteria by which students are evaluated for satisfactory performance and program progressions. The Essential Qualifications reflect a sample of the performance abilities and characteristics that are necessary to successfully complete the requirements of all nursing programs at PLU. All new and current PLU School of Nursing students are expected to embody these skills. Nursing students must attest to and demonstrate essential motor, sensory/observation, communication, cognitive, and behavioral/emotional skills necessary to be successful in the nursing profession.

The Essential Qualifications for Participation in School of Nursing Degree Programs are used to assist the student in determining whether or not they meet essential qualifications, or if accommodations or modifications might be necessary for successful completion of the program at the School of Nursing.

The School of Nursing at PLU is approved by the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission. Only graduates of approved programs are eligible to apply for licensing examination. Mental, physical or emotional impairment may result in the commission suspending a license or denying initial licensure. The Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission would expect, and the law requires, nursing programs to evaluate student performance and not pass them if they are unsafe for any reason. Refer to WAC 246 840 710 (5)(b).

A student’s inability to fulfill program requirements, due in part or in whole to her/his ability to meet the Essential Qualifications, may affect the student’s grade in a nursing course or courses, program progression, continued program enrollment, and/or program completion/graduation. Such consequences do not imply discrimination and/or harassment on the part of the faculty member assigning such grades. Inability to meet classroom and clinical performance expectations, with or without accommodations, will result in progressions consequences.

Students are required to sign a statement of understanding, acknowledgement, and compliance

each semester of the nursing program. For further information, contact the School of Nursing at PLU and the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission, P. O. Box 47864, Olympia, Washington 98504-7864.

Essential Qualifications for Participation in School of Nursing Degree Programs

The Bachelors of Science in Nursing, Masters of Science in Nursing and the Doctor of Nursing Practice signify that the holder of the degree from Pacific Lutheran University (PLU) is prepared to practice as a Registered Nurse and/or Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner in the State of Washington. For further health information regarding licensing for the State of Washington, potential students are encouraged to look at the Washington Department of Health documents.

Nurses must be educated to assimilate clinical, classroom, and laboratory knowledge, acquire skills, critically think and develop judgement through patient care experiences in preparation for semi-autonomous and independent practice, based on the level of nursing preparation. This is often done in collaboration with the patient and among other health care providers including physicians, nurses, and other health professionals. Therefore, intra- and inter-professional communication that is respectful, collegial, civil, and responsible is a requirement of every student enrolled in the program.

Motor Skills

A student should possess motor function sufficient to provide general care and treatment to patients across a variety of health care settings. The student should be able to move safely within work spaces and treatment areas. For safety, students must be able to assist with moving patients in a safe manner and must be able to perform emergency procedures such as basic life support (including Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) and/or function in other emergency situations.

Sensory/Observation

A student must be able to use and interpret information presented through demonstrations and experiences in nursing. He or she must be able to observe a patient accurately, at a distance and in close proximity, and observe and appreciate non-verbal communications when performing nursing assessment and intervention or administering medications. The student must be capable of perceiving the signs of disease and infection as manifested through physical examination. Such information is derived from images of the body surfaces, palpable changes in various organs and tissues, and auditory information (patient voice, heart tones, bowel and lung sounds). The student must be able to modify decisions and actions when dictated by new relevant data or after analysis of existing data. The student should be capable of recognizing and responding appropriately to life-threatening emergencies.

Communication

The student must communicate effectively verbally, non-verbally, and in writing in a timely manner with other students, faculty, staff, patients, family, and other healthcare professionals. He or she must be able to express ideas clearly and must be open to giving and receiving feedback. The student must be able to convey and exchange information regarding assessments, solutions, directions, and treatments. The student must be able to communicate relevant data to clinical faculty and other healthcare professionals in a timely manner. The student must be able to ask for assistance and supervision when needed. Students are expected to be professional, responsible, sensitive, accountable, and ethical in all interactions that require communication among peer and other professionals on the healthcare team.

Cognitive

A student must be able to accurately elicit, measure, calculate, analyze, integrate, evaluate, and synthesize information collected throughout clinical, lab, and/or classroom settings across all levels of nursing study to adequately and effectively evaluate a patient’s condition. This includes being able to modify decisions and actions when dictated by new relevant data or after analysis of new or existing data. The student is expected to use information gained in courses based in the liberal arts, basic and applied sciences in the development of the plan of care which includes being able to relate pathophysiological and psychological basis of disease to client’s status. Students must be able to problem solve and think critically in order to develop appropriate treatment plans. Students must be aware of their abilities and contextual scope of practice depending upon setting and level within the program.

The student must be able to quickly read, comprehend, and apply extensive data obtained from written, digital and/or other materials in computer-information systems to the care of patients. The student must be able to acquire and apply information from demonstrations and experiences in the clinical setting, through prepared case studies, and/or through laboratory work. This information may be conveyed through online coursework, lecture, group seminar, small group activities and/or physical demonstrations.

Behavioral/Emotional

A student must possess the emotional health required for the full utilization of his or her intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients and families. In addition, the student must be able to maintain mature, sensitive, tolerant, professional, and effective relationships with patients, students, faculty, staff and other professionals under all circumstances. The student must have the emotional stability to function effectively under stress and to adapt to an environment that may change rapidly without warning and/or in unpredictable ways. The student must be able to experience empathy for the situations and circumstances of others and effectively communicate that empathy. The student must know that his or her values, attitudes, beliefs, emotions, and experiences affect his or her perceptions and relationships with others. The student must be able and willing to examine, evaluate, and change his or her behavior when it interferes with productive individual or team relationships. The student must possess skills and experience necessary for effective and harmonious relationships in diverse academic and working environments.

Reasonable Accommodations for Disabilities

It is our experience that a number of individuals with disabilities (as defined by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act) are qualified to study in the School of Nursing with the use of reasonable accommodations. To be qualified to attend the School of Nursing at PLU, all individuals must be able to meet all academic standards including the Essential Qualifications, with or without reasonable accommodations. The School of Nursing will work with the student and the Office of Accessibility and Accommodation to provide reasonable and appropriate accommodations. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the Office of Accessibility and Accommodation. While the School of Nursing will make every effort to work with our students with disabilities to accommodate their disability-related needs, it is important to note we are not required to provide requested accommodations that would fundamentally alter the essential functions or technical standards of the program. Additionally, we cannot guarantee that specific accommodations will be accepted within our partnering clinical settings and organizations. Further information on nursing students with disabilities can be found at the National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities: http://www.nond.org/

For further information regarding services available to students with disabilities and/or to request accommodations please contact the Office of Accessibility and Accommodation at:

Office of Accessibility and Accommodation
Tacoma, WA 98447-0003
Phone: 253-538-6392
Fax: 253-538-8252
Web site: www.plu.edu/oaa
Email: dss@plu.edu

A number of individuals with disabilities (as defined by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act) are qualified to study in the School of Nursing with the use of reasonable accommodations. To be qualified to attend the School of Nursing at PLU, all individuals must be able to meet both our academic standards and the Essential Qualifications, with or without reasonable accommodations. The School of Nursing will work with the student and the Office of Accessibility and Accommodation (OAA) office to provide reasonable and appropriate accommodations on a case-by-case basis and will be provided at no cost to the student.

It is the student’s responsibility to contact the Office of Accessibility and Accommodation. While the School of Nursing will make every effort to work with our students with disabilities to accommodate their disability-related needs, it is important to note we are not required to provide requested accommodations that would fundamentally alter the essential functions or technical standards of the program. Additionally, our partnering clinical settings and organizations reserve the right to make independent decisions as to whether specific accommodations will be accepted within the clinical practice setting. Further information on nursing students with disabilities can be found at the National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities.

While pregnancy is not considered a disability, it may impact a student’s educational progression. The School of Nursing recognizes that pregnancy is protected under Title IX. Students may voluntarily request accommodations related to pregnancy and childbirth. Students will not be penalized for absences related to pregnancy and childbirth as long as the student’s medical provider deems the absences medically necessary. However, students must meet applicable academic standards to complete the program, so any such absences, missed content, assignments, exams, or clinical experiences need to be made up as they would for any other approved absence. Medical provider clearance may be required in order to return to the patient care setting, and extended absences may affect program progression.

Students who have testing accommodations while a student at PLU may qualify for testing accommodations during the NCLEX-RN examination. To request testing accommodations the student will need to submit the following documentation to the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission:

  • A letter with her/his application and request for accommodation;
  • A letter from the student’s health care provider providing a diagnosis and identify the accommodation needed;
  • A letter from the nursing program certifying the student has obtained this accommodation while attending PLU.

If accommodations are requested, do not schedule an appointment to take the NCLEX-RN exam until you have received written confirmation of your accommodations and your ATT email indicating “Accommodations Granted.”

Candidates approved for testing with accommodations must schedule their testing appointment through the NCLEX Accommodations Coordinator by calling Pearson VUE NCLEX Candidate Services at the telephone number listed on their ATT and asking for the NCLEX Accommodations Coordinator. Candidates who seek to test with accommodation cannot schedule their appointments through the NCLEX Candidate website. Candidates with accommodations cannot cancel their accommodations at the time of their appointment.

Students frequently request letters of recommendation or references from faculty and/or staff members of the School of Nursing for scholarships, educational applications, employment, etc. Nursing students are instructed to first obtain consent from each faculty/staff member; faculty and staff may choose to decline the request at their discretion.

FERPA Release for Letter of Recommendation & References

Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), and following PLU’s FERPA Policy Statement, all students must sign a release for faculty/staff to disclose any educational information other than direct observation in a letter of recommendation or reference request. The FERPA Reference-Recommendation Release from the School of Nursing (see link below) should be completed and filed with the School of Nursing office when the Letter of Recommendation Request form is submitted. Faculty or staff may also ask to see a copy of this release.

The School of Nursing may remove a student immediately from a classroom or clinical situation if the faculty member believes the student is posing harm or significant risk of harm to a patient, client, or others. The faculty member is required to report the incident or concern to the Dean or their designee to begin the process of reviewing the incident in order to determine appropriate action. An incident report must also be filed. The student may be prohibited from attending courses or clinical during the investigational period. Events involving a student and a faculty member that the nursing education program has reason to believe resulted in patient harm, unreasonable risk of patient harm, or diversion of legend drugs must be logged and reported to the WA NCQAC within two business days of the event.

If the misconduct or safety issue is a potential violation of the PLU Code of Student Conduct, the matter will be referred to the PLU Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities and/or Campus Safety. PLU’s Conduct Procedures will be followed. The School of Nursing (through its RAP Committee and process) reserves the right to determine and apply additional conduct standards and sanctions for nursing professionals.

Removal from the classroom or clinical setting for safety reasons may result in failure of the course and clinical. Nursing students who demonstrate a pattern of unsafe practice or who violate standards of academic performance or professional conduct are subject to dismissal from the School of Nursing. Concerns related to student competency or professional conduct will be referred to the School of Nursing RAP committee and/or the Dean or designee for review.

Misconduct may also include disruptive behavior, incivility, sexual misconduct, drug/alcohol abuse, criminal behavior, or violations of professional code. In a professional nursing program any such behaviors may be academic in nature and may be grounds for academic sanctions or dismissal from the program.

Academic integrity is honesty concerning all aspects of academic performance including clinical performance. Academic integrity in the classroom is defined in the PLU Student Rights and Responsibilities. Academic dishonesty in the clinical setting includes, but is not limited to:

  • Plagiarizing clinical assignments, including care plans, drug reviews, falsifying data in a patient’s record, or other required work,
  • Submitting work written by others as one’s own work,
  • Unauthorized collaboration with others in fulfillment of assignments,
  • Falsifying data or deliberately submitting inaccurate information; and
  • Covering up or denying knowledge of an error in the clinical setting,
  • Falsifying data or documentation regarding patient/client visits or clinical activities in any setting.

Faculty are expected to abide by PLU and SON policy on academic integrity if s/he believes a student has engaged in a violation of academic integrity. All issues of Academic Integrity will be reviewed by the School of Nursing RAP Committee to determine if the breach is severe enough to warrant a recommendation of further sanctions, including dismissal from the program. Violations of academic integrity that meet the PLU definition of academic dishonesty must be reported to the PLU Campus Life Committee as stipulated in the PLU Student Rights and Responsibilities policy, https://www.plu.edu/student-code-of-conduct/student-code-of-conduct-policies/academic-integrity/.

Nursing students are expected to attend all scheduled classes, to be in the clinical areas as assigned, and to be on time. Faculty may set other attendance requirements for particular classes or clinicals. Failure to attend the first two classes or a clinical orientation will result in removing the student from the course and affects program progressions accordingly.

A minimum number of clinical hours is required to complete clinical rotations. Absences for any reason, excused or not, may adversely affect the course grade. Unexplained/unexcused absences may result in failure and will definitely affect the student’s grade.

The laboratory component of nursing courses is an integral part of the nursing program. Minimum required numbers of clinical hours must be completed for successful program completion and for attestation of NCLEX-RN licensure and national certification exam eligibility. Successful demonstration of technical nursing skills in the lab is vital to ensure safe nursing practice in the clinical agencies. Therefore, attendance at all scheduled lab demonstrations, practices and tests is mandatory.

If an absence is unavoidable, the student is responsible for remedial work to master the material or activity missed, as well as for notifying the instructor(s) in a timely, appropriate manner. If a scheduled exam or evaluation activity is missed, the faculty member is not obligated to provide a make-up opportunity. This can be expected to adversely affect the final course grade.

Progression in the nursing major is dependent upon satisfactory completion of the prescribed sequence of courses. Nursing students must obtain a minimum grade of “C” (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) in all required prerequisite and nursing courses before progressing to the next sequence of nursing courses. Students who earn less than a “C” (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) in any nursing course must repeat that course in its entirety in order to continue in the program. Required courses may be repeated only once. The option to repeat a nursing course is not guaranteed. See Course Failure and Petition Process sections for more information. Students who earn a “C-” or below in a repeated nursing course are not permitted to enroll in the course a third time; they are dismissed from the nursing program.

Earning less than a C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale), is defined as failing a course in the nursing program. Withdrawal from a course in failing status is considered equivalent to a course failure. Failure or withdrawal in failing status from any two nursing courses will result in dismissal from the School of Nursing.

If a student encounters circumstances beyond his or her control, the student is responsible for addressing the concern as soon as possible with faculty members and with the academic advisor. The Recruitment, Admission and Progression Committee (RAP) and/or the Dean may require documentation and testimony regarding the circumstances.

The School of Nursing faculty may enact a Performance Progression Alert (PPA) for students who are not meeting the Essential Qualifications or not performing to academic, clinical, lab, or professional standards at any point in the academic term and program of study. The PPA will specify the nature of the performance concern, criteria for satisfactory performance, the timeline for achieving expected improvements, and consequences for failure to improve. The notice will be signed by the issuing faculty member and the student. The original signed form is placed in the student’s School of Nursing academic file. Communication regarding the notice will be submitted by the issuing faculty member to the following School of Nursing personnel: Academic Advisor; Chair of RAP committee; Associate Director of Advising, Admission, and Student Support; Associate Dean for Academic Affairs; School of Nursing Dean; and as appropriate, Lead Course Faculty, and/or the SoN Clinical Placement Coordinator. Deficiencies are categorized as minor and/or major based on the severity of the event. Major violations will result in immediate notification to the School of Nursing Dean. Three separate minor and/or a single major occurrences during the program of study will result in a review by the RAP committee and/or the Dean of Nursing and may result in dismissal from the School of Nursing. Any occurrences that place the client, self, or others in potential immediate danger will result in immediate review by the Dean.

Deficiencies are categorized as minor and/or major based on the severity of the event. Faculty are required to provide immediate notification to the SoN Dean for major deficiencies. Three separate minor and/or a single major occurrence during the program of study will result in a review by the RAP committee and/or the Dean of Nursing, and may result in dismissal from the School of Nursing. Any occurrences that place the client, student, or others in potential immediate danger will result in immediate review by the Dean and require reporting to the WA NCQAC within two business days.

PPA Definition and Procedure

The School of Nursing faculty may enact a Performance Progression Alert for students who are not meeting the Essential Qualifications or not performing to academic, clinical, lab, or professional standards at any point in the academic term and program of study. The Notice of Deficiency will specify the nature of the performance concern, criteria for satisfactory performance, the timeline for achieving expected improvements, and consequences for failure to improve. The notice will be signed by the issuing faculty member and the student. The original signed form is placed in the student’s School of Nursing academic file. Communication regarding the notice will be submitted by the issuing faculty member to the following School of Nursing personnel: Academic Advisor; Chair of RAP committee; Advising, Admission, and Student Support Coordinator; Graduate Program Coordinator(for graduate students); School of Nursing Dean; and as appropriate, Lead Course Faculty and/or the SoN Clinical Placement Coordinator.

Deficiencies are categorized as minor and/or major based on the severity of the event. Major violations will result in immediate notification to the School of Nursing Dean. Three separate minor and/or a single major occurrences during the program of study will result in a review by the RAP committee and/or the Dean of Nursing and may result in dismissal from the School of Nursing.

All faculty are responsible for identifying and addressing occurrences. The following list is offered as a guideline for students to see the types of behaviors that may result in an issuance of a Performance Progression Alert. These are but a few examples and are in no way meant to be limiting or all in encompassing. For further information, please consult the Essential Qualifications document.

Minor occurrences may include:

  • Unprofessional communication behaviors
  • Inappropriate professional dress in clinical or lab
  • Inappropriate utilization of technology during class
  • Not being prepared for learning in lab, clinical, or classroom
  • Failure to demonstrate the expected level of clinical competency
  • Turning in late, wrong, unfinished, or incomplete assignments
  • Tardiness and/or absences from lab, clinical, or classroom (excused and unexcused)
  • Inappropriate behaviors and/or lack of judgment relative to assigned clinical activities, professional relationships, or interactions that are part of the learning environment
  • Poor performance in the lab, clinical environment, or classroom
  • Other disruptive lab, clinical, or classroom behaviors

Major occurrences:

  • Life-threatening errors
  • Unsatisfactory clinical performance
  • Failure to report an incident
  • Falsifying medical records
  • Cheating/Plagiarism
  • HIPAA violations
  • Professional misconduct and safety Issues as defined in the School of Nursing Student Handbook
  • Violations of the law or other legal regulatory requirements
  • Other unsafe behaviorsAny occurrences that place the client, self, or others in potential immediate danger will result in immediate review by the Dean

Incomplete grades provide a mechanism for students who are in good standing but have significant unforeseen circumstances preventing course completion in the normal time-frame. Incomplete grades affect nursing program progression and thus are permitted only in exceptional circumstances. If a student wishes to request an incomplete grade, they must first obtain permission from RAP before they are allowed to negotiate with the faculty of record. This will require the student to work with their advisor to petition RAP and complete the student’s portion of the Incomplete Contract Form from the Registrar’s office. The petition to RAP should include the reason for the request for an incomplete grade as well as a plan that would allow the student to complete the grade. The decision by the RAP committee will be whether or not the student may negotiate with the course faculty for an incomplete grade. The course faculty has the right to refuse an incomplete grade request regardless of the RAP decision and will determine the final plan for successful completion of the grade. Incomplete grades must be completed before the beginning of the next semester in which the student will be enrolled in nursing courses. Incomplete grades that are not completed by the agreed upon date on the Incomplete Contract Form by the beginning of the next nursing term will default to the agreed upon grade or E/F.

Students who earn a “C-” or below in a nursing course, or withdraw in failing status (withdrawal in failing status is considered a failure in the School of Nursing), will be placed on academic probation in the School of Nursing. Students may repeat a failed nursing course, or enroll in other subsequent nursing courses, only after a review by the RAP committee. Each situation is individually evaluated, and permission to continue and/or repeat is not automatically granted.

Students who need to repeat a nursing course must first petition to do so. See Course Failure and Petition Process sections of the SoN Student Handbooks for more information. If repeating the course is permitted, the student will register on a space-available basis. If all sections of the course are closed the student must register for the course during a later semester. If progression is delayed for more than one (1) semester, the student may be required to enroll in a 1 credit skills refresher course, NURS 491-IS Nursing Clinical Skills Refresher, prior to being allowed to continue in clinical courses. Students in regular progression are given preference.

When a student repeats a course, both the new and original grade will appear on their official transcript. However, PLU uses the higher of the two grades to determine the cumulative GPA. For further information regarding PLU’s policy on repeating courses, review the PLU handbook (undergraduate policies & procedures or graduate policies & procedures).

Students who earn a “C-” or below in a repeated course are not permitted to enroll in the course a third time; they are dismissed from the nursing program. Dismissal from the School of Nursing is an action that can be taken only by the Dean. Program dismissal may be based on a recommendation by the RAP committee or in egregious situations, may occur independent of RAP review. Students dismissed from the program due to unsatisfactory performance may appeal the decision to the University Dispute Resolution Committee. The UDRC review is limited to whether a School of Nursing or University policy, including the policy on Equal Opportunity, was violated. Students who are dismissed from the School of Nursing for academic performance may re-apply to the nursing program.

When disagreements arise over grades assigned in a course, students and faculty are first expected to follow the SoN’s established procedure for informal grade dispute resolution. If the informal procedure is unsuccessful in resolving the grade dispute, the student may elect to file a petition with the RAP committee.

Procedural Steps:

  1. A student considering a grade dispute must first read the appropriate section in the Student Handbook in its entirety and discuss it with their assigned faculty advisor before proceeding to step 2. If the student’s advisor is also the faculty member responsible for submitting the disputed grade, the student should contact the School of Nursing Advising, Admissions & Student Support Coordinator to determine an alternative advisor for these proceedings.
    1. The difference between the disputed grades must be one full letter grade or higher, with the exception of those grades that could result in dismissal from, or delay in, the nursing program. (Examples: A- vs. A, No dispute; B vs. A, Can be disputed; C- vs. C, Can be disputed.)
    2. Grounds for grade disputes should arise from documented incidents of discrimination and/or harassment based on race, religion, age, color, creed, national or ethnic origin, gender, sexual orientation, marital status or disability, and/or arising from non-compliance with established PLU and/or School of Nursing policies and procedures.
    3. The grade must be disputed within seven (7) working days after the grade has been officially posted, and prior to beginning the first day of any courses for which the disputed course/grade is prerequisite.
  2. A student who chooses to dispute a grade should first initiate the informal grade dispute process in the following manner, by addressing the matter with the faculty member responsible for submitting the grade:
    1. Submit to the responsible faculty member a written statement, detailing why the grade is being disputed and the grade and/or remedy the student is seeking, and requesting an appointment to meet with the faculty member.
      1. The student is responsible for providing a copy of the written statement to the School of Nursing Administrative office to be placed in the student’s official School of Nursing academic file.
      2. The written statement should be available during the discussion between the student and the responsible faculty member.
    2. After the initial discussion, the responsible faculty member should provide a written statement detailing the issues discussed, including why the grade will or will not be changed.
      1. Both the responsible faculty member and the student should sign this written statement; the student should have an opportunity to provide additional written comments.
      2. The faculty member is responsible for submitting this statement, along with any additional written comments from the student, to the School of Nursing office to be placed in the student’s official School of Nursing file.
  3. If the matter is not resolved between the student and the responsible faculty member, the student may request assistance and advocacy from his or her faculty advisor. With regard to written statements, requests for meetings and discussions held between the responsible faculty member, the faculty advisor, and the student, should follow the same procedures and guidelines as outlined in Step #2.
  4. If the matter is not resolved after discussion with the faculty member and the faculty advisor, the student may initiate the formal grade dispute process by appealing to the Recruitment, Admission, and Progression (RAP) Committee. The RAP committee will make a recommendation to the Dean, who will make the final determination. If the Dean is the faculty member responsible for submitting the disputed grade and/or is the student’s advisor, the student may appeal to the provost. With regard to written statements, requests for an appeal, and discussions held between the responsible faculty member, the faculty advisor, the student and the Dean or provost, should follow the same procedures and guidelines as outlined in Step #2.
  5. If the student chooses to pursue the matter beyond Step #4, he or she may submit a grievance to the University Dispute Resolution Committee (UDRC). It is expected that the procedure outlined here will be followed in its entirety before a grievance is made to the UDRC. All copies of written statements from the student’s official School of Nursing file regarding the grade dispute will be made available to the UDRC upon request.

All written statements become part of the student’s educational record and will be included in the student’s official School of Nursing file.

As a general guideline, response time from receipt of a written request to a reply to that request should be no longer than ten (10) working days. However, time constraints necessitated by the university and/or School of Nursing calendar may prevent this from occurring.

Many student interactions with the RAP committee require the student to submit a petition to explain the circumstances of their situation. The petition process allows students to request an exception to policy, permission to step out of the nursing curriculum sequence, address professional conduct issues, or to dispute a grade. Regardless of the circumstances, the process of writing a petition is the same. Please also see the SoN Student Handbook section on Interplay between PLU’s Student Code of Conduct and the School of Nursing. Students are required to work with their academic advisor to be sure petitions are complete and accurate.

  1. Students considering a petition must contact their academic advisor as soon as possible. Advisors are responsible for assisting the student to determine the best course of action: what type of petition the student should pursue, how to craft this petition, and the process involved.
  2. After meeting with their advisor, students may also request a meeting with the Advising, Admissions, and Student Support Coordinator to discuss the petition process further and determine a timeline for completion.
  3. The student will draft a statement that outlines their request, their reason for this request, and their proposal for future study and/or course(s) of action. This statement will vary depending upon the student’s circumstances and request. Students should consult with their advisor to determine what kinds of information should be included in the statement.
  4. Additional documentation, such as primary care provider notes, may also be required.
  5. Students may request letters of support from current nursing faculty, but this is not required.
  6. Once the petition statement is complete, students must submit it to their advisor for feedback and suggestions.
  7. Once the advisor deems the statement suitable, the student may submit the statement, along with any supporting documentation, to the Advising, Admissions, and Student Support Coordinator.
  8. The petition will be reviewed at the next available Recruitment, Admissions, and Progression (RAP) committee meeting.
  9. The student has the option to make a personal presentation at the RAP meeting, and to bring along one academic advisor or designated faculty substitute.
  10. Students may also choose to bring witness to the event if applicable. However, personal attendance at the RAP meeting is not required.
  11. Based upon their collective evaluation of the petition, the RAP committee will make a recommendation to the Dean regarding the petition. This recommendation will include an approval or denial of the petition, and may contain suggested or required course(s) of action from the student.
  12. The Dean will review the petition and the committee’s recommendation before making the final determination.
  13. Students will be informed by mail of the outcome. At this point, petition decisions are final.
  14. Students may contact the University Dispute Resolution Committee (UDRC) if they feel the processes for the petition did not follow School of Nursing or University policy. The UDRC review is limited to whether a School of Nursing or University policy, including the policy on Equal Opportunity, was violated.
    Students who have petitions denied should consult with their advisor to determine how best to proceed with their nursing education.
  15. Students who have petitions approved, but fall out of sequence with their cohort, will be placed in a new cohort on a space available basis.

Additional information on student-faculty disputes and petitions is outlined in the SoN Student Handbook. Other forms of student-faculty informal or formal dispute resolution and petition are expected to abide by the processes as outlined above.

Students are expected to maintain professional boundaries and relationships in all SoN academic experiences. Students should not give their home/cell phone numbers to clients or a client’s family. Students should have clients contact them through either the clinical agency or through an approved method of communication as determined by the clinical faculty. When students need to contact clients for community clinical, students should call their clients during the regular workday; unscheduled calls should not be made after 8:00 p.m. or on the weekend.

Students are not permitted to sign as witnesses for legal documents such as surgery permits or consents. It is also strongly recommended students not witness wills or other similar legal documents. Students are expected to refer any such requests to the faculty member or appropriate nursing personnel.

Students are discouraged from giving gifts to faculty and clinical staff or accepting gifts from clients. Students are encouraged to show their appreciation through words and thank you notes rather than gifts.