English

253.535.7295 www.plu.edu/english/ english@plu.edu
Nathalie op de Beeck, Ph.D., Chair

Foreign Language Requirement

All English majors must complete at least two years of a foreign language at the university level, or the equivalent (see College of Arts and Sciences Foreign Language Requirements, Option I).

Bachelor of Arts Degree

Major in English (Emphasis on Literature)

At least 36 and up to 44 semester hours in English (excluding WRIT 101) with at least 20 hours upper division, distributed as follows:

ENGL 300: English Studies Seminar
4 semester hours

Required for all English majors. ENGL 300 must be taken before, and not concurrently with, ENGL 400 and Senior Capstone (ENGL 451/452). The department recommends that students take ENGL 300 in their sophomore or junior year.

Literature and Social Change Requirement
16 semester hours, upper-division courses (300-level)

Students must take courses in at least two of three historical periods (i, ii, iii):

(i)    Before 1660
(ii)   1660-1900
(iii)  1900-present

and courses in at least two of three national/global literatures (Am, Br, GI):

Am: American
Br:   British
GI:    Global Anglophone

Students choose at least one course from category (1):

(1) Literary Innovations and Historical Contexts

ENGL 301: Shakespeare – LT (i)
ENGL 351: Studies in Literature before 1660 – LT (i)
ENGL 360: Studies in British Literature – LT (i, ii, iii)
ENGL 370: Studies in American Literature – LT (i, ii, iii)
ENGL 380: Studies in Global Anglophone Literatures – LT, C (i, ii, iii)
ENGL 386: Studies in Literary History – LT (i, ii, iii)
ENGL 393: The English Language
ENGL 399: Critical Theory – LT, WR
PPAP 301: The Book in Society

Students choose at least one course from category (2):

(2) Literature, Culture, and Power

ENGL 334: Studies in Literature for Young Readers – LT
ENGL 343: Post-Colonial Literature and Theory – LT, A or C
ENGL 348: Studies in Literature, Culture, and Power – LT, A or C
ENGL 394: Studies in Literature and the Environment  – LT
ENGL 395: Studies in Literature, Gender, and Sexuality – LT, A or C
ENGL 396: Studies in Literature, Race, and Ethnicity – LT, A or C
ENGL 397: Literatures of Genocide and the Holocaust – LT, A or C
ENGL 398: Studies in Literature and the Body – LT, A or C

Content of courses in category (2) varies by instructor and may have a historical period (i, ii, iii) designation.

Electives
4 to 8 semester hours

Any ENGL designated courses (100 to 400 level) as well as PPAP 301: The Book in Society; PPAP 302: Publishing Procedures; PPAP 321: Art of the Book I; and PPAP 322: Art of the Book II. Courses not listed above include:

ENGL 213: Topics in Literature: Themes and Authors
ENGL 214: Introduction to Major Litearary Genres
ENGL 216: Topics in Literature: Emphasis on Cross-Cultural Perspectives – C, LT
ENGL 217: Topics in Literature: Emphasis on Alternative Perspectives – A, LT
ENGL 231: Topics in European Literature – LT
ENGL 232: Women’s Literature – A, LT
ENGL 233: Post-Colonial Literature – C, LT
ENGL 234: Environmental Literature – LT
ENGL 235: Children’s Literature – LT
ENGL 241: American Traditions – LT
ENGL 251: British Traditions – LT

Writing
4 semester hours
Any writing course from the 200-400 levels

ENGL 400: Studies in Theory and Criticism
Prerequisite: ENGL 300. Both 300 and 400 must be taken before the Capstone Seminar.

Capstone Senior Seminar
4 semester hours
Prerequisites are ENGL 300 and ENGL 400. The capstone seminar, generally taken in the senior year, includes a capstone presentation consistent with the general university requirements.

ENGL 451: Seminar – Major Authors
ENGL 452: Seminar – Theme, Genre

Major in English (Emphasis on Writing)

At least 36 and up to 44 semester hours in English (excluding WRIT 101) with at least 20 semester hours upper division, distributed as follows:

ENGL 300: English Studies Seminar
4 semester hours

Required for all English majors. Must be taken before (not concurrently with) the Senior Capstone (ENGL 425, 427 or 429). Students are recommended to take ENGL 300 in their sophomore or junior year.

Genres and Practices
16 semester hours, taken from 3 out of the 4 lines below, with at least 8 hours upper division

      • Line 1: Creative Nonfiction
        • ENGL 220: Introduction to Creative Nonfiction
        • ENGL 225: Autobiographical Writing
        • ENGL 320: Intermediate Creative Nonfiction
          (Prerequisite: ENGL 220)
        • ENGL 322: Place-Based Writing
          (Prerequisite: WRIT 101)
        • ENGL 325: Personal Essay
          (Prerequisite: WRIT 101)
        • ENGL 385: Special Topics in Creative Nonfiction
          (Prerequisite: ENGL 220, 225, 227, 324, 325, or consent of instructor)
      • Line 2: Poetry and Fiction
        • ENGL 227: Introduction to Poetry and Fiction
        • ENGL 326: Writing for Young Readers
        • ENGL 327: Intermediate Poetry Writing
          (Prerequisite: ENGL 227 or instructor approval)
        • ENGL 329: Intermediate Fiction Writing
          (Prerequisite: ENGL 227 or instructor approval)
        • ENGL 339: Special Topics in Fiction Writing
          (Prerequisite: ENGL 227)
      • Line 3: History and Theory
        • PPAP 301: The Book in Society
        • ENGL 328: Theories of Reading and Writing
        • ENGL 387: Topics in Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture
        • ENGL 393: The English Language
        • ENGL 399: Critical Theory
      • Line 4: Writing in Specific Contexts
        • ENGL 221: Research and Writing
        • PPAP 302: Publishing Procedures
        • ENGL 323: Writing for Professional and Public Settings
        • ENGL 324: Freelance Writing

Electives
4 to 12 semester hours
Any English designated courses: literature, writing, or publishing and printing arts.

Literature
8 semester hours, with at least 4 hours upper division
Students are encouraged to take literature courses which contribute to their goals as writers, and which expand their experience with the history and genres of writing.

Capstone Senior Seminar
4 semester hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 300, plus courses specified below.

The Capstone seminar, generally taken in the senior year, includes a capstone presentation consistent with the general university requirements. Students must select from the following courses:

      • ENGL 425: Seminar: Nonfiction Writing
        (Prerequisite: ENGL 220, 300, 320)
      • ENGL 427: Seminar: Poetry Writing
        (Prerequisite: ENGL 300 and 327)
      • ENGL 429: Seminar: Fiction Writing
        (Prerequisite: ENGL 300 and 329)

Minors

  • Literature
    20 semester hours (excluding WRIT 101), distributed as follows:
        • 4 semester hours of Shakespeare
        • 8 semester hours from Historical Surveys and Topics (see Literature Major Requirements)
        • 8 semester hours of electives
  • Writing
    20 semester hours (excluding WRIT 101), with at least 12 semester hours in upper-division courses, distributed as follows:
        • 12 semester hours in writing
        • 4 semester hours in literature
        • 4 semester hours of electives
  • Publishing and Printing Arts
    24 semester hours.
See separate listing under Publishing and Printing Arts.

Prospective Teachers

Students preparing to teach English in secondary schools should arrange for an advisor in both English and Education. Please also see the Department of Education section of this catalog.

Secondary Education

Students preparing to teach in junior or senior high school may earn either a Bachelor of Arts in English with Certification from the Department of Education in the School of Education and Kinesiology or a Bachelor of Arts in Education with a teaching major in English. See course requirements in the Department of Education. The English major with an emphasis in literature and the English major with an emphasis in writing may both be pursued by prospective teachers. Secondary education students must fulfill all requirements for the English major: Option I of the Foreign Language Requirements (2 years of a foreign language at the university level or the equivalent); at least 36 and no more than 44 semester hours in English; and all the specific requirements for the major either in literature or in writing. State certification for teachers also mandates the following requirements, which are an overlay to the major. Courses taken to satisfy the major can also be courses that satisfy the state certification requirements.

        • English literature: one course
        • American literature: one course
        • Comparative literature: one course (ENGL 214, 216, 217, 232, 233, 341, 343, appropriate seminar)
        • Linguistics or structure of language: one course (ENGL 393)
        • Writing/Composition: one course (ENGL 328 is especially recommended)

Prospective teachers may take EDUC 529: Reading and Writing Across the Secondary Curriculum as an elective in the English major.

Elementary Education

Students preparing to teach in elementary schools following the Language Arts curriculum, must take 24 semester hours minimum in English, and are advised to follow the structure of the English major in satisfying state certification requirements. Consult your advisor in the Department of Education.

Graduate Program Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing (Low Residency): Go to the Graduate and Post-Baccalaureate section of this catalog.

English (ENGL) - Undergraduate Courses

ENGL 190 : FYEP190: Inquiry Seminar

A four-credit seminar to introduce students to the methods and topics of study within a particular academic discipline or field. Students practice the academic skills that are at the center of the General Education Program. (4)

ENGL 213 : Topics in Literature: Themes and Authors - LT

A variable-content course that focuses on the act of reading and interpreting texts. (4)

ENGL 214 : Introduction to Major Literary Genres - LT

Introduction to one or more of the major literary genres (fiction, poetry or drama). Focus of course varies with instructor and term. May be taken more than once for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 216 : Topics in Literature: Emphasis on Cross Cultural Perspectives - C, LT

A variable-content course that focuses on literature from non-Euro-American societies. Because course topics may vary considerably, course may be repeated for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 217 : Topics in Literature: Emphasis on Alternative Perspectives - A, LT

A variable-content course that focuses on literature that fosters an awareness and understanding of diversity in the United States. Courses may be repeated for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 220 : Introduction to Creative Nonfiction - WR

Introduces students to basics of creative nonfiction. Focuses on how genre of creative nonfiction adapts the elements of fiction to create works of literary nonfiction in a range of forms. Required for most 300-level nonfiction writing courses. (4)

ENGL 221 : Research and Writing - WR

Strategies for writing academic research papers are practiced, including developing appropriate research topics, locating and using a variety of relevant sources, substantiating generalizations, and using paraphrase and citation accurately. (2 or 4)

ENGL 225 : Autobiographical Writing - WR

Reading autobiography and writing parts of one's own, with an emphasis on how writing style and personal identity complement each other. (4)

ENGL 227 : Introduction to Poetry and Fiction - WR

A beginning workshop in writing poetry or short fiction. Includes a study of techniques and forms to develop critical standards and an understanding of the writing process. Prerequisite: WRIT 101 or its equivalent, Advanced Placement, or consent of instructor. (4)

ENGL 231 : Topics in European Literature - LT

Representative works of classical, medieval, and early Renaissance literature. Cross-listed with CLAS 231. (4)

ENGL 232 : Women's Literature - A, LT

An introduction to fiction, poetry, and other literatures by women writers. Includes an exploration of women's ways of reading and writing. (4)

ENGL 233 : Post-Colonial Literature - C, LT

Writers from Africa, India, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the Caribbean confront the legacy of colonialism from an insider's perspective. Emphasis on fiction. (4)

ENGL 234 : Environmental Literature - LT

Examines representations of nature in literature, and the ways in which humans define themselves and their relationship with nature through those representations. Focuses on major texts from various cultures and historical periods. Includes poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. (4)

ENGL 235 : Children's Literature - LT

An introduction to the critical reading of picture books, chapter books, novels, and nonfiction for young readers, addressing historical and cultural contexts. (4)

ENGL 241 : American Traditions in Literature - LT

Selected themes that distinguish American literature from British traditions, from colonial or early national roots to current branches: for example, confronting the divine, inventing selfhood, coping with racism. (4)

ENGL 251 : British Traditions in Literature - LT

Selected themes that define British literature as one of the great literatures of the world, from Anglo-Saxon origins to post-modern rebellions: for example, identity, society, and God; love and desire; industry, science, and culture. (4)

ENGL 287 : Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 288 : Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 289 : Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 291 : Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

ENGL 300 : English Studies Seminar

A variable-content seminar (theme selected by instructor) focusing on the imaginative, critical, and social power of reading and writing. Students will read and write in a variety of genres, engage criticism and theory, and reflect on the broad question of why reading and writing matter. Required for all English majors before taking senior seminar. Strongly recommended for sophomore year or fall semester of junior year. (4)

ENGL 301 : Shakespeare - LT

Critical study of Shakespearean comedies, tragedies, history plays, and late romances, with particular attention to both close-reading and historical context. (4)

ENGL 311 : The Book in Society

A critical study of the history of book culture and the role of books in modern society. Cross-listed with COMA 321. (4)

ENGL 320 : Intermediate Creative Nonfiction

Intermediate-level writing workshop that focuses on the analysis and writing of creative nonfiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 220. (4)

ENGL 322 : Place-Based Writing

A writing course in which students develop skills in essay, short memoir, and researched nonfiction that is rooted in place, taking a particular community or region as a primary inspiration for the creative work. (4)

ENGL 323 : Writing in Professional and Public Settings - WR

Students working in professional settings analyze the rhetorical demands of their job-related writing. (4)

ENGL 324 : Free-Lance Writing - WR

A workshop in writing for publication, with primary emphasis on the feature article. (4)

ENGL 325 : Personal Essay - WR

Students write essays on topics of their choice, working particularly on voice and style. (4)

ENGL 326 : Writing for Young Readers - WR

A workshop in writing for young audiences, with an introduction to contemporary children's and youth literature. Prerequisite: WRIT 101.

ENGL 327 : Intermediate Poetry Writing - WR

An intermediate-level workshop that focuses on the analysis and writing of poems. Prerequisite: ENGL 227. (4)

ENGL 328 : Theories of Reading and Writing - WR

Students are introduced to philosophical, social, and pragmatic issues confronting teachers of writing. Required for certification by the School of Education and Kinesiology. (4)

ENGL 329 : Intermediate Fiction Writing WR

An intermediate-level workshop that focuses on the analysis and writing of fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 227. (4)

ENGL 334 : Studies in Literature for Young Readers - LT

Study of literature and media produced for and about young audiences, from early childhood to adolescence. Possible topics include genres, themes, historical periods, and traditions. Course content varies. ENGL 334B covers the 1660-1900 time period and ENGL 334C covers 1900-present. Course is repeatable once. with different topic. (4)

ENGL 339 : Special Topics in Fiction Writing

Intermediate-level writing workshop that focuses on the analysis and writing of fiction in a particular style or form. Course topic varies by year. Prerequisite: ENGL 227 or instructor approval. (4)

ENGL 341 : Feminist Approaches to Literature - A, LT

Introduction to a variety of feminisms in contemporary theory as frameworks for reading feminist literature and for approaching traditional literature from feminist positions. (4)

ENGL 342 : American Ethnic Literatures - A, LT

Attention to literatures and popular traditions of America's ethnic communities. Includes African and Asian Americans, Native Americans and Latino/as. (4)

ENGL 343 : Post Colonial Literature and Theory - LT, A or C

Introduces perspectives of post-colonial theorists as a framework for understanding the relationship of colonialism and its legacies to the works of writers from Africa, the Caribbean, and other ex-colonial territories. Course content varies. ENGL 343B covers the 1660-1900 time period and ENGL 343C covers 1900-present. (4)

ENGL 345 : Special Topics in Literature and Difference - A or C, LT

A variable-content course, focusing on specific authors, themes, genres, or historical periods in literatures in English written by marginalized or under-represented groups. May be repeated for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 348 : Studies in Literature, Culture, and Power - LT, A or C

Study of literature in its historical and social contexts through particular critical and cultural lenses that draw attention to the dynamics of power relations. Emphasis is on careful interpretation of literary texts via the application of critical paradigms. Course content varies. ENGL 348A covers the pre-1660 time period; ENGL 348B covers 1660-1900; ENGL 348C covers 1900-present. A or C General Education credit will vary by semester. Course is repeatable once with a different topic.

ENGL 351 : English Medieval Literature - LT

A survey of the first two periods of English literature: Old English, including the epic Beowulf, and Middle English, ranging from the romance Sir Gawain and the Green Knight to the beginnings of English drama in Everyman. (4)

ENGL 360 : Studies in British Literature - LT

Study of specific historical periods, literary movements, socio-cultural issues and themes, or major authors in British literature. Emphasis is on careful interpretation of literary texts with attention to their contexts. Course content varies. ENGL 360A covers the pre-1660 time period; 360B covers 1660-1900; 360C covers 1900-present. Course is repeatable once with different topic. (4)

ENGL 370 : Studies in American Literature - LT

Study of specific historical periods, literary movements, socio-cultural issues and themes, or major authors in American literature. Emphasis is on careful interpretation of literary texts with attention to their contexts. Course content varies. ENGL 370A covers the pre-1660 time period; 370B covers 1660-1900; 370C covers 1900-present. Course is repeatable once with different topic. (4)

ENGL 380 : Studies in Global Anglophone Literature - LT, C

Study of specific historical periods, literary movements, socio-cultural issues and themes, or major authors in global Anglophone literature. Emphasis is on careful interpretation of literary texts with attention to their contexts. Course content varies. ENGL 380A covers the pre-1660 time period; 380B covers 1660-1900; 380C covers 1900-present. Course is repeatable once with different topic. (4)

ENGL 385 : Special Topics in Creative Nonfiction -WR

An open-topic course focusing on a specific subgenre of or topic in nonfiction prose writing. Possible topics might include the lyric essay, memoir, biography, environmental writing, social justice writing, etc. May be repeated for credit with approval of department chair. (4)

ENGL 386 : Studies in Literary History - LT

Study of how literary genres emerge and evolve; how specific authors shape one or more genres, develop specific literary techniques, or respond to historical moments; or how a literary movement forms, develops a set of principles, and shapes the literature of its own time and beyond. Course content varies. ENGL 386A covers the pre-1660 time period; 386B covers 1660-1900; 386C covers 1900-present. Course is repeatable once with different topic. (4)

ENGL 387 : Topics in Rhetoric, Writing and Culture

Provides writers with a grounding in Rhetoric, the art of shaping discourse to respond to cultural context and to produce cultural and social effects. Strategies for generating discourse, appealing to audiences, and crafting a style will be studied in light of their historical origins, theoretical assumptions, social and ethical implications, and practical utility. Recommended for writing majors. (4)

ENGL 388 : Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 389 : Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 393 : The English Language

Studies in the structure and history of English, with emphasis on syntactical analysis and issues of usage. (4)

ENGL 394 : Studies in Literature and the Environment - LT

Study of literature and media on landscape, human/animal categories, conservation, sustainability, climate, and planet. Approaches may involve ecocritical, ecofeminist, animal studies, or green standpoints. Texts come from genres and movements including ecopoetics, realist fiction, speculative fiction, sf, creative nonfiction, blogs, film, performance, and public art. Course content varies. ENGL 394A covers the pre-1660 time period; 394B covers 1660-1900; 394C covers 1900-present. Course is repeatable once with different topic. (4)

ENGL 395 : Studies in Literature, Gender, and Sexuality - LT, A or C

Study of literature through the lens of gender and sexuality. Students practice feminist and queer approaches to literature from a range of historical periods, genres, and 13 national/global contexts. Additionally, this course creates a venue for students and faculty to study literature written by and about sexual and gendered minority communities, including women writers of color and LGBTQ authors. Course content varies. A or C General Education credit will vary by semester. Course is repeatable once with different topic. (4)

ENGL 396 : Studies in Literature, Race, and Ethnicity - LT, A or C

Study of literature through the lens of race and ethnicity. Students explore English-language texts written by authors of color, and/or writers from marginalized ethnic, immigrant, or indigenous communities. Focus may be on specific authors, themes, genres, or historical periods. Course content varies. ENGL 396A covers the pre-1660 time period; 396B covers 1660-1900; 396C covers 1900-present. A or C General Education credit will vary by semester. Course is repeatable once with different topic. (4)

ENGL 397 : Literatures of Genocide and the Holocaust - LT, A or C

Study of representations and narratives that attempt to engage and make sense of the Holocaust and other genocides. Texts may include a variety of literature written in multiple genres (poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, life writing) and media (film, television, plays, photography, blogs) from a range of historical periods and national/global contexts. Course content varies. ENGL 397A covers the pre-1660 time period; 397B covers 1660-1900; 397C covers 1900-present. A or C General Education credit will vary by semester. Course is repeatable once with different topic. (4)

ENGL 398 : Studies in Literature and the Body - LT, A or C

Study of literary works that address questions of human or non-human embodiment. Topics may include bodily rhetorics, constructions, health, disability, disease, and/or wellness. Course content varies. ENGL 398A covers the pre-1660 time period; 398B covers 1660-1900; 398C covers 1900-present. A or C General Education credit will vary by semester. Course is repeatable once with different topic. (4)

ENGL 399 : Critical Theory - LT, WR

Issues in literary studies and in rhetorical theory are discussed in relationship to influential movements such as reader-response, cultural studies, feminism, and deconstruction. Recommended for prospective graduate students. (4)

ENGL 400 : Studies in Theory and Criticism

Pre-capstone seminar on applied methods in literary theory and criticism, with a focus on critical approaches to literary analysis since 1900. Students gain experience in applying various schools of criticism and theory to primary texts, while practicing advanced critical writing and research strategies. Required for all English Literature majors prior to registering for the senior literature capstone. Prerequisites: 1) ENGL 300 and 2) junior standing or consent of instructor. (4)

ENGL 425 : Seminar: Nonfiction Writing - SR, WR

An advanced-level workshop in the writing of nonfiction prose. Focus (on genre or theme) varies with instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 300 and one upper-division course from lines 1, 3 or 4 of writing emphasis, or instructor permission. (4)

ENGL 427 : Seminar: Poetry Writing - SR, WR

An advanced-level workshop that focuses on the analysis and writing of poems. Prerequisites: ENGL 300 and 327, or instructor permission. (4)

ENGL 429 : Seminar: Fiction Writing - SR, WR

An advanced-level workshop that focuses on the analysis and writing of fiction. Prerequisites: ENGL 300 and 329, or instructor permission. (4)

ENGL 451 : Seminar: Major Authors - LT, SR

Concentrated study of the work, life, influence, and critical reputation of a major author in the English-speaking world. The course includes careful attention to the relations of the author to cultural contexts, the framing of critical approaches through literary theory, substantial library research, and a major writing project. (4)

ENGL 452 : Seminar: Theme, Genre - LT, SR

Concentrated study of a major literary theme or genre, as it might appear in various periods, authors, and cultures. The course includes careful attention to practical criticism, the framing of critical approaches through literary theory, substantial library research, and a major writing project. (4)

ENGL 487 : Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 488 : Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 489 : Special Topics in English

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

ENGL 491 : Independent Study

An intensive course in reading. May include a thesis. Intended for majors only. (4)

ENGL 495 : Internship

To permit undergraduate students to relate theory and practice in a work situation. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as Intern: followed by the specific title designated by the instructor in consultation with the student. (1 to 12)

Last Modified: September 8, 2017 at 8:20 pm