Psychology

253.535.7294 www.plu.edu/psychology/ psyc@plu.edu
Wendelyn Shore, Ph.D., Chair

Bachelor of Arts Degree

students coming out of Xavier Hall
Major in Psychology

42 semester hours, including:

  • PSYC 101, 242, 499
  • One of PSYC 310, 315, 320, or 330
  • Two of PSYC 440, 442, 448, or 481
  • At least 2 semester hours from PSYC 495, 496, or 497
  • 12 semester hours of elective psychology courses
  • STAT 232 (psychology class) and accompanying lab are required.

Bachelor of Science Degree

Major in Psychology

62 semester hours, including:

  • PSYC 101, 242, 481, 499
  • One of PSYC 310, 315, 320, 330
  • One of PSYC 440, 442, or 448
  • At least 2 semester hours from PSYC 495, 496, or 497
  • 12 semester hours of elective psychology courses
  • STAT 232 (psychology class) and accompanying lab
  • 20 semester hours in mathematics and natural science are required. Of the 20 hours, at least 4 semester hours must be in mathematics and at least 8 semester hours in biology. Those students who, after graduating from PLU, plan to enter schools of dentistry, medicine, public health, or veterinary medicine should note the specific pre-professional mathematics and science requirements in the appropriate sections of this catalog.

Minor

20 semester hours, including:

  • At least 12 semester hours must be taken in residence. If a statistics course is used as part of the 20-hour requirement, then it must be STAT 232 (psychology class) taught by a member of the psychology department.

The minor in psychology is designed to supplement another major in the liberal arts or a degree program in a professional school, such as business, education, or nursing.

Department Policies

  • Course Prerequisites: A grade of C- or higher must have been earned in a course in order for it to qualify as a prerequisite and to apply towards the major.
  • Experiential Learning: All Psychology majors are required to take a minimum of 2 semester hours of PSYC 495, 496 or 497.
  • Capstone: Psychology majors are required to complete a capstone project and present this project as part of PSYC 499 at the Psychology Research Conference held every term.

Psychology (PSYC) - Undergraduate Courses

PSYC 101 : Introduction to Psychology - SO

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Topics include learning, memory, perception, thinking, development, emotion, personality, mental illness, and social behavior. (4)

PSYC 242 : Advanced Statistics and Research Design

A continuation of Statistics 232 and accompanying lab taught by members of the psychology department. Topics include single- and multi-factor experimental designs and analyses of variance, multiple regression, quasi-experiments, surveys, and non-parametric statistical techniques. Students will learn to use computer programs to carry out statistical analyses and will have the opportunity to design and conduct their own research study. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: STAT 232 and accompanying lab taught by members of the psychology department. (4)

PSYC 287 : Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 288 : Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 289 : Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 291 : Directed Study

To provide individual undergraduate students with introductory study not available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as DS: followed by the specific title designated by the student. (1 to 4)

PSYC 310 : Personality Theories

Strategies for the study of personality. Review of theories and research. Discussion of implications for counseling. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 315 : Abnormal Psychology

Models of psychopathology. Diagnosis and treatment of abnormal behaviors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 320 : Development Across the Lifespan

Biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development from conception through adulthood to death. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 330 : Social Psychology

The study of how an individual's thoughts and behaviors are influenced by the presence of others. Research and theory concerning topics such as person perception, attitudes, group processes, prejudice, aggression, and helping behaviors are discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 335 : Cultural Psychology

The study of the relation between culture and human behavior. Topics include cognition, language, intelligence, emotion, development, social behavior, and mental health. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 345 : Community Psychology

Intervention strategies that focus primarily on communities and social systems. Particular stress on alternatives to traditional clinical styles for promoting the well-being of communities and groups. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 360 : Psychology of Language

The study of language as a means of communication and structured human behavior. Topics include: biological foundations of language, psycholinguistics, speech perception and production, sentence and discourse comprehension, nonverbal communication, language acquisition, bilingualism, language disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 370 : Gender and Sexuality

Study of the social, biological and cultural factors that contribute to human sexuality and gender-related behavior. Topics include sexual identity, typical and atypical sexual behavior, reproduction, communication, intimate relationships, masculinity, and femininity. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 375 : Psychology of Women - A

Exploration of psychological issues pertinent to women. Includes such topics as sex differences; psychological ramifications of menarche, child bearing, menopause, sexual harassment, and rape; women's experiences with work and achievement, love and sexuality, and psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 380 : Industrial/Organizational Psychology

The study of human behavior in work settings. Application and extension of psychological principles to the individual operating within an organization context - including measuring and facilitating job performance, worker motivation, organizational attitudes and behavior, leadership, and group processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 385 : Consumer Psychology

Social psychological principles applied to consumer attitude-formation and decision-making—e.g., perception of advertisements, influence of reference groups and opinion leaders, and learning effects upon repeat purchasing. Emphasis on audience, message, and media factors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)

PSYC 387 : Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 388 : Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 389 : Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 410 : Psychological Testing

Survey of standardized tests; methods of development, standardization, limitations and interpretations of tests. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, STAT 232, or consent of instructor. (4)

PSYC 420 : Adolescent Psychology

Physical development, mental traits, social characteristics, and interests of adolescents; adjustments in home, school, and community. Prerequisite: PSYC 320. (4)

PSYC 435 : Theories and Methods of Counseling and Psychotherapy

Introduction to basic methods of counseling and psychotherapy, and examination of the theories from which these methods derive. Prerequisites: PSYC 310, 315, 345, or 410; or consent of instructor. (4)

PSYC 440 : Human Neuropsychology

Study of the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological mechanisms of behavior and mental function. Topics include perception, voluntary action, spatial processing, language, memory, emotion, social behavior, and consciousness. Prerequisite: STAT 232. (4)

PSYC 442 : Learning: Research and Theory

A critical overview of the research data on human and animal learning, and of the theoretical attempts to understand those data. Prerequisite: STAT 232. (4)

PSYC 448 : Cognitive Psychology

The study of human thought. Topics include attention, perception, memory, knowledge and concept formation, language, problem-solving, and reasoning. Prerequisites: STAT 232. (4)

PSYC 481 : Research Seminar

An advanced course providing students the opportunity to design and conduct ongoing research and review current research in a psychology subdiscipline. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PSYC 242 and consent of instructor. (4)

PSYC 483 : Seminar

Selected topics in psychology as announced. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (2 to 4)

PSYC 487 : Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 488 : Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 489 : Special Topics in Psychology

To provide undergraduate students with new, one-time, and developing courses not yet available in the regular curriculum. The title will be listed on the student term-based record as ST: followed by the specific title designated by the academic unit. (1 to 4)

PSYC 491 : Independent Study

A supervised reading, field, or research project of special interest for advanced undergraduate students. Prerequisite: Consent of supervising faculty. (1 to 4)

PSYC 495 : Internship

A practicum experience in the community in the clinical, social, and/or experimental areas. Classroom focus on case conceptualization and presentation. May be repeated for up to eight semester hours. Prerequisite: sophomore standing plus one course in psychology and consent of the department. (1 to 8)

PSYC 496 : Research Practicum

Research experience under the direct supervision of a faculty member, students may design and/or conduct research in a designated area of psychology. May be repeated for up to eight semester hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or consent of instructor. (1 to 4)

PSYC 497 : Teaching Apprenticeship

Teaching experience under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Course provides the opportunity to learn how to effectively communicate information, understand classroom management, and develop teaching skills. Students may serve as a teaching assistant for the same psychology course no more than twice. May be repeated for up to four semester hours. Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in class for which a TA , a minimum 3.0 overall G.P.A., junior standing at time the course is offered, consent of instructor. (1 to 4)

PSYC 499 : Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR

Required for Psychology majors. Students will complete and present at an on-campus Psychology Research Conference held fall and spring terms. Students earning the B.S. degree must conduct empirical research projects whereas as students earning the B.A. degree may choose nonempirical projects. The projects may emerge from ideas and experiences in an upper-division psychology course, advanced research activity, or in response to an internship completed by the student. Prerequisites: PSYC 242, senior standing, and permission of instructor. (4)

Last Modified: July 20, 2017 at 9:17 pm